Dec
9

Two Rules for New Entrepreneurs

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now Rule Number One: You Are In Sales. Sell.It doesn’t matter what your entrepreneurial endeavor is, your primary job at the beginning of your adventure is client acquisition, i.e. SELLING. You started your business because you recognized a need in the market. You developed a plan to meet the market’s need. Now you have to go and sell your idea—your product, your service, or your solution—to the market.If you start a manufacturing company, you need clients to give you orders. If you start an accounting firm, you need clients to give you bookkeeping and other accounting work. If you started a web design company, you need clients to hire you to do their design work.You want to be a little Mom & Pop shop? You need clients. You want to scale your idea and blow it up? You need clients.As an entrepreneur, you’re in sales. The game is client acquisition.Rule Number Two: Don’t Run Out of Cash.If you run out of cash, you run out of time. You can’t make good decisions when you’re desperate. You take unprofitable clients. You take clients that don’t really appreciate the value you create. You make bad business decisions because you’re trying to stay alive.If you run out of cash completely, the game is over. That chapter of your entrepreneurial adventure is finished.So how do you keep from running out of cash? See rule number 1.last_img read more

Dec
9

How To Create Value by Being Proactive

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Being a consultative salesperson and a trusted advisor requires you to be proactive. Being proactive creates greater trust, destroys latent dissatisfaction, and moves you to a higher level of value creation as a salesperson. Here are five actions you can take to be proactive now.Lead Your Clients: If you wait for your clients (or dream clients) to raise their hand and tell you they need your help, you aren’t leading. One of the reasons there is so much latent dissatisfaction (read lack of pain) is that most of your prospects don’t know how dissatisfied they should be. They count on smart, business savvy salespeople to keep them informed on what is happening in their industry and what is possible. Some of the ways you create value is by leading your client, by showing them the performance they are capable of, by helping them identify and close gaps, and by helping them build the case for change.Share Solutions: We are taught not to prescribe before we diagnose. This approach is always right, except when it isn’t. In some cases, being proactive means you have to present a solution before your client agrees they have a problem, and before they are willing to work on that problem. Sometimes it can take months or years to gain agreement around a change. But your job is to be proactive, and being proactive means showing your clients the biggest, best, most value creating solution possible, even if they aren’t ready to change, and even if they can’t swallow the whole thing in one bite.Be Resourceful: The trick to being proactive is to move from quarter to quarter with new ideas and new initiatives. The trick is to never grow complacent, to never run out of “what’s next.” Being proactive means you have to come up with new ideas and new applications. It means you have to transport ideas from one industry to another, and you need to figure out how to port them over. You need to work with your team to answer the question, “How do we create the next level of value for this client?” New ideas make you a resource. No ideas makes you a liability.Schedule Implementation Meetings: When you sell something, you are accountable for ensuring your client obtains the results. One of the best ways you can make this happen is to schedule and lead implementation meetings to ensure that you handoff the operations piece of what you sell to the team who will deliver those results. There is no reason to wait until you have challenges—and you will have challenges—to work through the known issues and the likely challenges. Being proactive in handing off relationships and responsibilities makes it easier to overcome the problems, challenges, and roadblocks.Schedule Quarterly Business Reviews: First, proactively take credit for the good work you have done. Too many salespeople and sales organizations fail to take credit for the 98.2% of what went right and focus on the 1.8% that went wrong. Second, resolve the outstanding issues that make up that 1.8%. Then, present your ideas to improve over the next quarter. If you are going to be collaborative, then ask your client to share with you the changes they believe you need to make over the next quarter. You may be doing excellent work, but dissatisfaction finds it’s way into your client’s company when complacency finds its way into yours. Make being proactive a process.QuestionsWhat one thing, if implemented now, would radically help your client or prospect improve their results?How many ideas do you have that would radically improve your client’s performance? How can you develop even more ideas and initiatives?How do you head off common problems and challenges before they occur?What formal process for being proactive do you have in place now?last_img read more

Dec
9

Success Is Not Graded On A Curve

first_imgSome teachers grade their students on a curve. A straight A student might have their grade pulled down, and a D student may have their grade increased. When students are graded on a curve, the grades follow a normal distribution curve, so only the top 10% of students can get an A, the next 10% can get a B, the middle 60% get a C, students between 11% and 20% get a D, and the bottom 10% get an F.But that’s not how success works. You aren’t measured against your peers. You can get whatever grade you choose based on your own definition of success.The top 1%, the wealthiest people on Earth, may have more money, more homes, and more toys. But that is no indication that they are happy, that they are living up to their full potential, or that that single measurement means that they are successful. Mother Teresa, the Dalai Lama, and the guy down the street with his own small plumbing business may have more meaning in their lives, may be happier, and may be more successful using any other measure of success.Mother Teresa may have been in the bottom 1% when measured on wealth, and she surely spent her time with people that occupied that financial strata. She chose spiritual wealth over financial wealth.The only way to measure your own success is to measure it against your own definition. But don’t go easy on yourself when you define success.Start with this question: “What do I have to do to reach my full potential?”If you don’t perceive a serious gap here, you aren’t being honest, or you are delusional. If you are willing to be really introspective in answering that question, you just created a lifetime of work for yourself, and you are still unlikely to be able to honestly admit you weren’t capable of more.Answer this question: “What do I want to do?”It doesn’t matter what other people want to do with their lives. It doesn’t matter what other people want you to do with your life. Your definition of success can only be based on what you want to do with your life. And if it doesn’t change every ten years or so, you need to get yourself unstuck.And here is another big one: “What do I want to contribute?”I’ve asked a lot of successful people to define their success for me. I have yet found one who, upon reflection, hasn’t defined it through the contribution that they made to others, some cause greater than themselves. When you are young, it’s easy to measure your success by your own individual achievement. But if you grow up (which is different than aging), you can no longer accept your individual achievement as an acceptable definition; it has to be something bigger than you.Pulling other people down by believing that their definition of success is wrong doesn’t make you any more successful. Measuring yourself against someone else’s definition, especially society’s definition, doesn’t make that definition right for you either.There is no success curve. You have to define the grade yourself, and you have to measure yourself against it. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Dec
9

People Love to Be Sold

first_imgPeople love to buy but hate to be sold. You’ve heard this statement before, but it isn’t true. What is true is that people don’t want to be pressured to buy something they don’t want or don’t need. But they love to be sold the things they want.Yesterday, Apple announced their new watch. They already announced the watch last year, and there wasn’t much new to share. But people who love Apple tuned in to watch the live event or spent time reading the news reports. Why? They want to be sold.We want to be seduced. We are aspirational. We want to be more, do more, and have more. We love it when we are shown how much better we are going to be when we make some purchase.We want to be told we belong. We want to be included. We want to be part of a tribe, some tribe that speaks to our values and our beliefs. We wear the clothes and marks of our tribes. We love it when someone shows us how to join that tribe.We want help rationalizing our decision. People love to buy, and they love to have someone help them rationalize their decisions. We love having someone provide us with a logical argument to justify our emotional decisions.People generally like to be told that they can have what they want, and they want to be told how they can have it.The challenges for those in business-to-business sales are the constraints that prevent our dream client from making the necessary investments, the distribution of different wants across different groups of stakeholders, and the power of the status quo and the accompanying resistance to change.Even with these challenges, people still want to be told that they can have what they want. If you want to be a great salesperson, you will sell them on what they need to do to have what they want.last_img read more

Dec
9

Mistakes I Have Made In Sales

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now Every one of the following deals was worth millions of dollars a year. I lost all of them.The New StakeholderI was right in the middle of the process of winning what would have been a dream client. Then, one of the stakeholders left and new person took his place.I believed I had the consensus I needed to win the opportunity. That confidence caused me to underestimate the effect that a new stakeholder would have on the rest of a relatively large group of people. I didn’t spend enough time with him, believing I was okay. I wasn’t okay. I lost a deal I might have won had I respected the new stakeholder enough to go and discover his needs.I Already WonThere were only two companies competing for my prospect’s business. I had five meetings with the decision-maker, and I had pages and pages of notes. I built the exact solution that he told me he wanted. I had done such a god job, he had given me a verbal commitment.The next week he called and told me he had chosen our competitors. I asked why, and he gave me an answer: he heard something from them he never considered, but was enamored enough with the idea to change his mind. I didn’t gain a commitment to have a follow-up conversation with him should he discover he had a concern. I lost.The Wrong ProcessI received a call from a prospective client asking me to compete for their business. They were an enormous user, and I agreed to take part in their process. But I was never allowed to meet with anyone other than the purchasing manager who was in charge.This process didn’t serve me. Really, it didn’t serve the client. I knew in my gut that it was a waste of time, but the purchasing manager was so receptive and so agreeable to most everything else I asked for, I competed. Later, it became clear that he had chosen his supplier long before he brought me into the process, and following his process did nothing to give me a real opportunity to compete. I was the stalking horse.I should have sold him on giving me the commitment I needed, which would have been to change his process. But I naïvely believed I was really competing.I could easily add to this list the times I was confident I created enough value to command a higher price, the times I had believed I was winning only to find out I had lost, or the times I had believed that my dream client was going to fire their partner only to have their existing supplier leverage their relationships to keep the business.I could add the times when I tried too hard to win a deal, the times that I didn’t try hard enough, and the times my deal strategy backfired.You don’t learn to sell without losing. When you lose, you are provided with an opportunity to learn. Provided you are honest with yourself and provided you accept the responsibility for losing.last_img read more

Dec
9

What You Hear and What Isn’t Being Said

first_img Get the Free eBook! Want to master cold calling? Download my free eBook! Many would have you believe that cold calling is dead, but the successful have no fear of the phone; they use it to outproduce their competitors. Download Now Sometimes what your prospective client says isn’t the whole truth.When a prospective client says they are being “nickeled and dimed” by your competitor, it often means that your competitor is charging them appropriately for what they want. You know that sometimes giving your client what they want also requires that they make a greater investment.Where you hear dissatisfaction, what is really being said may be different.Your prospective client complains that your competitor hasn’t solved their problems, despite their complaints, and despite having been given a number of chances to do so. What you don’t hear is that your prospective client isn’t willing to make the changes on their side that are necessary to remedying their problems.Where you hear a compelling reason to change, what isn’t being said is as important as what is.The words you hear fall easily out of your prospective client’s mouth suggest that what they want is exactly what you deliver. They appear to be right in your sweet spot. You agree to execute and deliver the outcomes they need. What isn’t said is that their are certain things you need that are going to be difficult and expensive to deliver.After you agree to serve them, they move the goal post and tell you that you need to do things differently.Be careful believing that your prospect’s complaints about your competitor are the whole truth. Don’t assume your competitors are inept, that they don’t care, or that they don’t want to retain their clients.The faster a prospect is to bury your competitor, the more likely you are hearing only one side of a story that has another side that isn’t being shared. The more mature a prospect is, the less likely they will be to criticize your competitor.last_img read more

Dec
9

What’s New in This Version of You

first_img Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now Each time a new update to a software program is released, it comes with an explanation of what changes and improvements have been made to the software since the last version was released. The improvements are often additions, new functionalities, that allow the user to perform something unavailable in prior versions. Those improvements might also clean things up, improving the appearance and the overall functionality of the software. Sometimes, the changes are so revolutionary, the software is referred to with a different number or a different name because the changes are so radical.Over time, you experience upgrades of your own. You go from version 1.0 to version 2.0 to version 3.0, and so on and so forth.This week I had a conversation with a friend of mine, who described to me how much he’s changed in the last 10 years. He’s gained a better understanding of who he is, why he is who he is, what he wants, and how to be more effective at everything he does. He’s excited by where he is now, and I had the opportunity to remind him that 10 years from now he’ll realize how little he resembles the person that he is today in many ways.Some of us are growth oriented. We focus on upgrading our hardware in our software consistently. If you’re growth-oriented you’re continually working on improving areas of your life, mind and body alike. You will have projects around your physical health and fitness, your mental and spiritual health, your relational health with the people you care about, your financial health, and all of the areas of your life, personally and professionally.It’s not an easy set of questions to answer, but it’s worth asking yourself, “What’s new?”A more difficult question might be, “What do I believe now that’s different than what I believed five years ago?”You might also ask yourself the question, “If I ran a video of my actions and behaviors from five years ago and compared them with the video of what I’m doing now, what would I notice as being the primary differences and what new results would I be producing?”Software provides an excellent metaphor for thinking about what version you are now, and what improvements are going to be incremental, and what is necessary for a radical transformation. So, what’s new in this version of you?last_img read more

Dec
3

Arunachal Pradesh, where moves are afoot to keep out migrants

first_imgAs Assam gets ready to publish the final draft of the National Register of Citizens by June 30, neighbouring Arunachal Pradesh is tightening its borders.What happened?Last month, contractors in East Siang district of Arunachal Pradesh said 90 infrastructure projects were on hold because 2,000 labourers had left to ensure that their names figured in the NRC. More than a fortnight later, the police in Longding district caught 87 labourers without the Inner Line Permit (ILP) and pushed them back to where they came from — Assam. Similar drives against “ILP violators” saw more than 350 people being thrown out from other districts of the State over the next few days. But the administration in Itanagar indicated that the drive had more to do with keeping out illegal migrants “who may create a law and order problem and disturb peace.” This is linked to the theory that Assam might end up with lakhs of stateless people after the final draft is made public.Where is ILP applicable?A British-era system, the ILP is a travel document Indian citizens need to possess to enter the frontier States of north-eastern India: Aruanchal Pradesh, Mizoram and Nagaland. It is issued under the Bengal Eastern Frontier Regulation, 1873, to regulate the movement of people who do not belong to these States. The ILP is valid for a week, but can be extended. People who frequent these States for work can opt for a special ILP renewable annually. Since the ILP is mandatory for Indians and the Protected Area Permit for foreigners, the fact that the labourers ejected from Arunachal Pradesh did not possess the permit put their nationality under a cloud.Where does NRC fit in?Two days after the first draft of the NRC was published on December 31, 2017, Assam Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal said those who were identified as foreigners after failing to make it to the list would be barred from all constitutional rights. Political commentators have said the NRC may leave 5 to 10 lakh people, mostly those with the ‘Bangladeshi’ tag, stateless. Assam’s neighbours fear some of those declared non-citizens may relocate to their territories to cash in on the demand for cheap labour. On January 4, Aruanchal Pradesh Chief Minister Pema Khandu ordered the police to strengthen vigil along the border with Assam. Around the same time, the former Nagaland Home Minister, Kuzholuzo Nienu, wanted to bring the State’s commercial hub Dimapur under the purview of the ILP because “illegal migrants sneak into Nagaland through the city.” The ILP is not applicable in Dimapur.Where will they go?The sister States often blame Assam for their problems with “illegal migrants” who are ironically indispensable as skilled and unskilled workers. Nagaland even has a term for them — IBI, which expands to Illegal Bangladeshi Immigrant. Organisations such as the Naga Students’ Federation conduct a ‘census’ to keep a record on the number of non-Nagas as well as IBIs. In 2008, several Bengali-speaking Muslims were driven out of Nagaland’s Mokokchung town, and this triggered vigilantism against “demography-changing” migrants. A similar drive happened in 2015, while in October 2017, residents of Chumukedima town adopted a resolution to keep IBIs out. Social scientists in Assam say the movement of flood- and erosion-displaced people to urban spaces usually trigger doomsday theories about illegal migrants outnumbering the indigenous people in the near future. The bulk of such people live on impermanent chars or sandbars on the Brahmaputra river system. There are more than 3,500 sandbars in Assam, though the official count, according to the last census by the State’s Char Areas Development Authority 14 years ago, is 2,089. These chars had 24.9 lakh people then, 9.35% of Assam’s population. It is believed the ‘ILP violators’ or ‘IBIs’ or the stateless-to-be will disappear — allegedly to the chars that often fall off the radar of the administration — until their need to survive meets the demand for labour.last_img read more

Dec
3

Mob attacks ‘militants’ in Assam

first_imgSashastra Seema Bal (SSB) personnel deployed in Assam’s Cachar district for law and order duties saved two suspected militants from the wrath of a 3,000-strong mob on Saturday. The two suspects died of injuries at a hospital on Sunday.The six SSB personnel were deployed at Harinagar market in Cachar district to assist the local administration after a strike was called to protest against the alleged killing of five Bengali-speaking persons in Tinsukia district last week.Around 11 a.m. on Saturday, locals spotted six suspicious people with luggage in the market. They confronted them and caught two of them, while the other four escaped, an SSB official said.“The two militants were surrounded by a crowd and were being thrashed when the SSB team, deployed 200 metres away, intervened. The crowd swelled into thousands but SSB held its ground till the SP, Cachar, reached the spot,” an SSB official said. The duo was shifted to a hospital by the SSB, where they passed away.During the search, the SSB and the police recovered a large cache of arms and ammunition from the suspects. Three AK 56 rifles, one Chinese-made LMG (light machine gun), two 5.56 mm rifle HK 33, one 5.56 mm MK- II rifle, one .22 mm pistol, one 12 bore gun, one Chinese hand grenade, 308 live rounds of 5.56 mm, 361 live rounds of 7.62 mm, 40 live rounds of .22 mm, two live cartridges of 12 bore, four magazines of the AK 56 rifle, three magazines of 5.56 mm rifle, and two mobile handsets were recovered.last_img read more

Dec
3

“Poachers’ trap led to death of translocated tiger”

first_imgA translocated tiger, the carcass of which was found in an Odisha sanctuary last month, died after falling into a trap laid by poachers, two central government agencies dealing with wildlife have said.This was stated by a joint inspection team of the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) and the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) in its report.The report is at variance with the state government’s claim that the big cat named “Mahavir” died after killing a porcupine, the spine of which was found in its stomach during post-mortem.The report of the joint team of the NTCA and the WII said “Mahavir” had sustained deep wounds around its neck while trying to escape from a trap laid by poachers for catching wild boar.The big cat died due to multi-organ failure as the wound had led to an infection, which, in turn, had led to sepsis, it added.The three-year-old Royal Bengal Tiger was found dead in the core area under the Raigoda range on the Hindol-Narsinghpur border of the Satkosia Tiger Reserve (STR) on November 14.A member of the WII involved in the investigation said, “The trap might have been set up to capture wild boar, so it cannot be called targeted poaching, but accidental.”Replying to a question, the WII official further said: “We need to take a serious lesson from this and formulate future strategies.”The joint investigation report also suggested that the STR authorities needed to implement more anti-poaching measures before other big cats were shifted there under the inter-state tiger translocation programme.As part of the programme, six tigers are to be brought to Odisha from Madhya Pradesh. The state has already procured two of the big cats since June.“Mahavir” was brought from the Kanha National Park in Madhya Pradesh on June 20 and kept inside an enclosure at Raigoda on June 21. After observing his behaviour, forest officials had released him into the wild of Satkosia on July 6. A radio collar was fitted to its neck to keep track of the animal’s movement.The other Royal Bengal Tiger — a female named “Sundari” — procured by Odisha has allegedly killed two people, prompting the state government to shift the animal to a special enclosure at the Rayagada area in Angul district.last_img read more

Dec
3

Updated: New Review Slams Fusion Project’s Management

first_imgITER, the international fusion reactor project in France, is reeling from an assessment that found serious problems with the project’s leadership, management, and governance. The report is so damning, Science has learned, that after a 13 February special session that reviewed and accepted the report’s conclusions and recommendations, the ITER Council—the project’s governing body—restricted its readership to a small number of senior managers and council members. ITER leaders fear that the damning assessment, combined with expected delays, could cause backers to pull their funding.For the full story, see this week’s issue of Science.*Update, 28 February, 3 p.m.: The executive summary of the report on management of the international ITER fusion reactor project was published today by The New Yorker.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Dec
3

No career confusion for social spiders

first_imgFemale social spiders don’t mind being stereotyped. The 5- to 8-mm-long brown arachnids (Anelosimus studiosus, shown), which live in colonies composed of about six females in North and South America, pick jobs that best suit their personalities. Aggressive spiders are most likely to be hunters, defenders, and web engineers, researchers report online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, whereas docile spiders are more likely to care for young. The choices make sense, according to the study: Compared with docile spiders, aggressive spiders are more than twice as effective at capturing prey; they construct webs that last 64% longer; and they are more than eight times as likely to successfully repel intruders by chasing them off and then buffering the colony with thick, mazelike matrices of silk. Likewise, when the colony hatched dozens of offspring, the little ones survived twice as long under the docile spiders’ care; the aggressive spiders had the unfortunate tendency to mistake their progeny for food.last_img read more

Dec
3

Why you should swing your arms when you run

first_imgMost of us swing our arms when we run, but why? Scientists know there is a mechanical benefit to the motion: Swinging arms counterbalance the momentum of a person’s legs, providing stability to the runner. The jury was out, however, on whether the activity saves energy. In a new study, researchers compared the energy cost of running in four different positions. The experiment looked at 13 subjects’ oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production while running. Reporting this week in The Journal of Experimental Biology, the team concludes that swinging your arms uses 3% less energy than keeping your hands behind your back, 9% less energy than folding your arms over your chest, and 13% less energy than running with your hands above your head. The study notes that the muscular power used while holding the arms in unusual positions may contribute to some of the extra energy cost.last_img read more

Dec
2

Indian Food Bears a Middle Eastern Stamp

first_imgthe food platters from the UAE resemble those from India, and the treats from India bear a Middle Eastern stamp. Related Itemslast_img

Dec
2

Kircket

first_imgAll the plastic chairs are taken, but I haven’t stayed an extra day in Singapore just to stand for eight hours with the baking sun on my neck. The ticket seller, a stern looking woman with a blood-red bindi, has warned me not to enter the cordoned off section of the Ceylon Sports Club marked “members only.” But as soon as she resumes plucking tickets out of a small green booklet I grab my chance and part the crowd with a few well placed excuse-me’s.I settle into a chair with faded pink upholstery and chipped varnish. Though I’m a little worried about impending humiliation-a tap on the shoulder and a nod toward the exit-it seems worth the risk. From here I have a clear view of a rolled down television screen on which eleven men in green and two in blue have entered a packed stadium in distant Karachi, Pakistan.On screen, Sachin Tendulkar lashes the ball to the fence. On my right, six rows of men on molded plastic chairs erupt: “HOI, HOI, HOI, HOI.”“They are Indian workers,” explains the man next to me, a retired Singapore-Indian civil servant with two-day stubble and a rolled up newspaper with a picture of a Chinese girl in an orange lollipop-swirl bikini. “They come whenever there’s a match.”There are about 350 of them, migrant construction workers from Tamil Nadu, India’s southern-most state; small, gaunt men with toes poking out of scuffed sandals or rubber flip-flops. The lucky ones have claimed the white plastic chairs behind a red tape barrier. The rest stand knitted together at the back or spill out cross-legged on the floor, squeezed against the bar to my left and several rows deep in the space between the screen and the first faded pink chairs.This is not the first time I’ve hunted down a cricket match in a city not my own. Almost exactly a year ago, I was on the edge of my seat in a stranger’s darkened apartment in New York as India and Pakistan clashed in South Africa in the World Cup. I’ve lingered over matches in hotel rooms in Kuala Lumpur, smoke-filled sports bars in Jakarta, messy dorm rooms in Princeton.But this match is special. India are playing in Pakistan for the first time in seven years. A lot has happened in the interim: nuclear weapons tests, a mini-war in Kashmir, an Indian plane hijacked to Afghanistan, a terrorist attack on India’s parliament, more than a million soldiers eyeball to eyeball on the border for the better part of a year.India get off to the kind of start television commentators like to call explosive. Or the kind they might call explosive if I could hear them. Where I sit you can watch, but you can’t listen. The speakers are positioned somewhere in the sea of white plastic chairs, as though to reward the ears of those whose eyes must strain the most, though I’m not sure that anyone can hear a word above the clapping, whistling and hooting. Of all of India’s defeats, none is seared as deeply in our collective memory as the one in Sharjah in 1986. After that day Sharjah was no longer a place-an Arab city where they sometimes import cricketers to entertain the Indians and Pakistanis who do all the work-but a byword for India’s infinite capacity to lose.         One man in the crowd stands out. A coarse green shirt hangs on his narrow shoulders and his eyes look like he awakes to nightmares.“Boundary-aa!” he exhorts the Indian batsmen to pummel Pakistan some more. “Boundary-aa, Six-aa! Boundary-aa, Six-aa! Boundary-aa, Six-aa!”The man charged with meeting his demand is Sachin Tendulkar, perhaps the most iconic figure in India. If you were to combine the popularity of Babe Ruth and Michael Jordan at the height of their powers you might get an approximation of what Tendulkar means to about a billion Indians. It has been 14 years since he first appeared on our TV screens, a scrawny 16-year-old with golliwog hair who could already wield a bat like an executioner’s axe or an opera conductor’s baton.Pitted against him is Shoaib Akhtar, nicknamed the Rawalpindi Express, the latest in a long line of marauding Pakistani quicks. Akhtar shakes his movie star mane and steams in to bowl-to hurl a white ball across 22 yards at almost 100 miles per hour.“BOUNDARY-AA, SIX-AA!” screams the man in the green shirt.Tendulkar smashes the ball and it soars into the Karachi stands. 350 Indians in Singapore are on their feet, their arms outstretched skywards.“WHOA, WHOA, WHOA, WHOA,” I bark, pumping my clenched right fist.My first memories of cricket go back to 1978. Another contest between India and Pakistan, this one after a 17-year hiatus in which the two countries had done their fighting on the battlefield rather than the cricket field. I was almost ten-years-old in 1978. My brother had just been born, and my mother was on maternity leave from her government job. I have this picture in my head of walking from the black and white Philips TV in the living room-we called it the drawing room- and coming to a stop outside a bathroom door with peeling white paint to ask my mother a question. I can’t quite remember what it was-maybe the meaning of LBW or the difference between off spin and leg spin-but I’m pretty sure that she knew the answer.Apart from a girl in third grade, whose name I wrote over and over in a narrow school diary covered with blue plastic, cricket first revealed my obsessive side. I memorized nicknames of West Indians who had played before I was born and batting averages of South Africans whose careers were short-circuited by apartheid. I collected little black and white photos of cricketers in floppy caps and gambled (only with duplicates) with the neighborhood urchins, throwing a picture in the air and shouting “chit” or “photo” as it spiraled to the ground. I lacquered my bat with too much linseed oil and spent scorching summer afternoons thwacking it with a cricket ball in an old sock to improve its “stroke.” I discovered that my mother really didn’t know that much.Tendulkar gets out. There’s a moment of stunned silence, then another player walks in to wild applause. This time the loss does nothing to slow India’s momentum. Another Indian batsman slams the ball across the ropes and the man in the green shirt is on his feet slicing the air with his arm as he mimics the umpire’s signal for four. “No single! Only four and six!” The camera cuts to a pair of commentators-an Australian and a Pakistani. “Manjrekar coming! Manjrekar coming!” shouts the man in the green shirt invoking the name of an Indian commentator.You can tell a lot about an overseas Indian by his relationship with cricket. There are those who give up their Indian passports but never give up on the team. To them I ascribe qualities like self-awareness and self-confidence. The other type is personified by the Indian who lands up in Silicon Valley, wipes his mind clean of cricket as though he’s rebooting a hard drive, and starts cheering for the San Francisco Giants or the 49ers. He embodies the slavish side of the Indian personality, the capacity to be dazzled by toilet paper and Burger King.  India lose a few wickets and the tempo slows. The man has slipped off his sandals and unbuttoned his green shirt. He slouches in his plastic chair sipping a large brown bottle of Baron’s beer with a yellow straw. He says something out loud in Tamil. A man with neatly combed hair sitting behind me leans forward.“You see even an illiterate fellow like this has good knowledge about the game,” he says.“He’s probably not illiterate. Most South Indians are literate these days,” I respond.“Okay, but I mean he’s not educated but he still knows a lot about the game. What he is saying is absolutely correct.”    You can tell a lot about an overseas Indian by his relationship with cricket. There are those who give up their Indian passports but never give up on the team. To them I ascribe qualities like self-awareness and self-confidence. The other type is personified by the Indian who lands up in Silicon Valley, wipes his mind clean of cricket as though he’s rebooting a hard drive, and starts cheering for the San Francisco Giants or the 49ers. He embodies the slavish side of the Indian personality, the capacity to be dazzled by toilet paper and Burger King.The arbiter of correctness is named Keerthi and works as a software manager for the Singapore branch of Halliburton, Dick Cheney’s Halliburton.By now I’m quite sure that the stern lady with the red bindi is not going to kick me out. I get up to find something to eat and the cross-legged men on the floor pull up their bony knees to let me pass. In a shaded corner just outside the viewing area, large bowls of food sit in a glass cabinet. I pay five Singapore dollars for a paper plate piled with steaming rice, a yellow daal with small pieces of eggplant, shredded cabbage with onions and cumin seeds, and curried mutton ribs. I ask the girl behind the counter to halve the mountain of rice on my plate and she repeats this to the man who had scooped it out from a hot box with an urgency that says she approves of such forbearance.The Indian batsmen fail to step things up in the last five overs but, thanks to the electric start, they still manage to pile up 349. To overhaul it, Pakistan will have to make the highest score ever for a team batting second. The players file off the field and the screen fills with a commercial for Molty Multifoam Mattress, apparently the best guarantor of a good night’s rest in Pakistan. The man in green has rebuttoned his shirt. He smokes a cigarette, drained, as though a battery in the back of his head has died.It has been more than four hours since the match began, but the crowd’s enthusiasm shows no signs of flagging. An Indian bowler, Zaheer Khan, strides halfway down the pitch to glare at a Pakistani batsman in the exaggerated way the hero in a Hindi movie glares at the villain. The construction workers titter like schoolgirls. A little later, L. Balaji, a new boy from Tamil Nadu, claims the first Pakistani wicket, sending a batsman’s off stump cartwheeling. We stand up and roar.“Tamil Nadu Singhamda,” screams the man in green.“That means Lion of Tamil Nadu,” explains Keerthi.Another wicket falls, the scoring rate remains tepid, and it begins to look like this match will be one-sided. The Pakistani batsmen are wading into quicksand. They must score quickly to have any hope of reaching the target, but the more they hurry the more likely they are to lose wickets. I’m happy. I haven’t come seeking a cliffhanger.            My throat feels sore so I step outside again for something to drink. When I return, clutching a Styrofoam cup filled with tea, I see a white plastic chair being passed down a row of workers.I reach out and pass it on as well before settling down to sip my tea, sweet, milky and especially satisfying for having cost only one dollar. It’s only a few minutes later that I notice that the man in the green shirt has disappeared.“Where’s he gone?” I ask Keerthi, pointing with my eyes to where he had been, to my right, in the first row behind the tape barrier.      We’ve grown so accustomed to failure that some of India’s most cherished sporting accomplishments are defeats–Milkha Singh edged out of the 400 meters bronze at the Rome Olympics, P.T. Usha breasting the tape fourth at the 1984 Los Angeles games. People still talk about almost winning that game against England at the Oval in 1979. Long ago, I concluded that as a nation we actually prefer the sweet sorrow of the near miss to the unfamiliar tang of victory.  “He said something unsportsmanlike so they decided to punish him. That was his chair they were passing around.”“What did he say?”“He said something like ‘You Pakistanis, learn to play.’”“That doesn’t sound that terrible.”“It’s not sportsmanlike. His friends are the ones who decided to punish him by taking away his chair.”Keerthi says this with pride. I can’t see what the fuss is about. In my book as long as you cheer the Indian players equally, as long as you cheer the Muslims as you cheer the Hindus, and Tamils and Punjabis as you cheer Maharashtrians and Kannadigas and even the slacker Bengali captain, it doesn’t really matter what you say about the other side. I wish the man in green would come back.The game is comfortably headed India’s way and then suddenly it isn’t. The quicksand that ought to have reached the Pakistani batsmen’s thighs by now is still below their knees. They plunder India’s captain for 14 runs in one over. We can see Pakistanis dancing in the stands in Karachi. The Ceylon Sports Club is hushed.Being an Indian is probably easier than being a Pakistani, especially now that we’re known for software and their biggest exports are nukes and terrorists. But being an Indian cricket fan has always been a tribulation, and there isn’t a single one out there who doesn’t have scars on his soul. We lost that series in 1978, going down 2-0 in three matches. In the third, at the same stadium in Karachi as today’s game, two cocky Pakistanis-Imran Khan and Javed Miandad-mauled the Indian captain Bishen Singh Bedi’s lazy, loopy bowling, effectively ending his career. Bedi’s son was in my school at the time. He was a quiet boy, maybe six or seven years old, probably dealing in his own way with being the only person on the planet named Gavasinder. I remember him being pushed around in the schoolyard by a couple of my classmates.The disappointments kept coming. A year after that tour to Pakistan, I sat up late in the kitchen one night, a crackly transistor radio glued to my ear as India came up nine short of an improbable 438 for victory against England. A quarter century later, I can still hear a Hindi commentator repeating over and over that “India’s position is rather fragile,” words that would etch themselves deeper in my brain with each passing year. In 1983 India pulled off one of cricket’s storied upsets by winning the World Cup.Yet, though I rejoiced with the rest, in my heart it always felt like a fluke, God’s private joke allowing a group of mild-mannered trundlers to put a spoke in the mighty West Indies machine.    At last, the man in green returns. He has recovered his chair and moved it a little to improve his view. He stretches his legs and smokes a bidi.“Sachin coming four wickets,” he declares. “No six, only wicket! No chance four, no chance six. Only wicket. Wicket! No six, no chance pa. Confirmed wicket.”As though by magic, Sachin Tendulkar is handed the ball. He’s a pedestrian bowler, but the man in green has acted as an oracle before and our spines stiffen with anticipation. Tendulkar ambles in and bowls. Yousuf Youhana lifts the ball into the air. It lands in the stands-six runs! The man in green slams his hand on his chair so hard that I worry the plastic may crack.“SACHIN WICKET!” he screams.The prayer goes unanswered. Tendulkar continues to take a pounding. After a while, Keerthi leans forward again.      When a match goes down to the wire like this, Indians smell defeat. “Indians lack killer instinct,” someone in the audience will inevitably say, or “Pakistanis are fighters.” I’ve heard these words as a graduate student in America, where cricket was all that filled the silence on the rare occasion that I found myself at a dinner table with Indian engineers or physicists. I’ve heard it in Jakarta, at the restaurant with lace curtains and too much green chili in the saag where I sometimes watch matches. I’ve probably said it a few times myself, and I’ve always believed it. “Tendulkar is going for good-length balls and Inzy is hooking them off,” he says. “Instead he should go for a short delivery.”Keerthi not only knows a lot about cricket; apparently he also knows a lot of cricketers. He used to live in Madras and can reel off names of friends in the Tamil Nadu side. There’s a V. Sivaramakrishnan, who once toured Sri Lanka with the Indian team. He’s not related to L. Sivaramakrishnan, the famous leg-spinner. There’s someone name Girish, who I haven’t heard of either. I ask Keerthi if he knows Sadagoppan Ramesh, a classy left-hand batsman in and out of the national squad. He says they’re good friends.Balaji returns to bowl again. “Tamil Nadu Singham,” shouts the man in green. But this time Balaji is bludgeoned. A Pakistani slaps the ball for the second four of the over. “Good shot,” says Keerthi. The British packed their bags 54 years ago, but he’s still bent on watching the gentleman’s sport like a gentleman. I wish he would go home.The camera turns to the Karachi crowd. They’re waving green and white Pakistani flags. A man in a loose salwar kameez whirls like a dervish. I read the lips of a little boy mouthing “Pak-is-tan, Pak-is-tan.”Of all of India’s defeats, none is seared as deeply in our collective memory as the one in Sharjah in 1986. After that day Sharjah was no longer a place-an Arab city where they sometimes import cricketers to entertain the Indians and Pakistanis who do all the work-but a byword for India’s infinite capacity to lose.It was a tournament final and for much of the day India looked the better team. But Pakistan fought back until finally they needed four runs off the last ball, not impossible but far from easy. India’s captain pushed his fielders to the boundary ropes in a defensive ring. Chetan Sharma, an innocuous striver, the only kind of fast bowler India seems capable of producing, ran up to bowl to Javed Miandad, the same Miandad who had thrashed the Indian bowlers in that series in Pakistan eight years earlier.Miandad calmly lifted the ball over midwicket for six. In India, the next day’s papers reported people dying of heart failure brought on by the excitement, though maybe it was really grief that killed them.It was around that time that I stopped playing cricket. I was never terribly good at it-the bottom always dropped out of my stomach when I faced pace-and then one summer I discovered, of all things, table tennis. You could play TT, as we called it, no matter the weather, and the room with the lopsided table where I whiled away evenings smashing forehands and slicing backhands was right next to the mud-floored court where the neighborhood girls played badminton.Someone bowls a good over. Keerthi says, “Come on guys. Conserve the next four overs exactly like this. Don’t give runs.” This redeems him a little in my eyes, but then a Pakistani batsman cracks a four and Keerthi says “very good shot.”Javed Miandad has long retired, but he refuses to go away. The Indian newspapers I read online every morning are full of stories about him in his new incarnation as Pakistan’s coach. Just the other day, Miandad mocked one of India’s promising new fast bowlers as the sort of kid you can find in every back alley in Pakistan. It hurts because it’s probably true. The camera zooms to the Pakistani dressing room balcony. Miandad waves his arms wildly at the batsmen in the middle.“Oyeh, oyeh,” hiss the construction workers. Their loathing is mixed with fear. It’s as though Miandad is a cricketing version of Freddy Kruger, back to preside over a new generation of our nightmares.Pakistan need 34 of 24 balls. A comparison chart comes on screen and you can see the Pakistani worm stabbing upwards toward India’s. When a match goes down to the wire like this, Indians smell defeat. “Indians lack killer instinct,” someone in the audience will inevitably say, or “Pakistanis are fighters.”I’ve heard these words as a graduate student in America, where cricket was all that filled the silence on the rare occasion that I found myself at a dinner table with Indian engineers or physicists. I’ve heard it in Jakarta, at the restaurant with lace curtains and too much green chili in the saag where I sometimes watch matches. I’ve probably said it a few times myself, and I’ve always believed it.A Pakistani wicket falls. We get up and scream. I shake hands with the man in front of me, an older man in ironed blue jeans and laundered white Nikes. “I think we’ve just broken the sound barrier,” he jokes. But he’s not smiling. It’s pitch dark outside now and pouring. The workers who had started the day with the sun on their backs have inched deeper into the clubhouse.We’ve grown so accustomed to failure that some of India’s most cherished sporting accomplishments are defeats–Milkha Singh edged out of the 400 meters bronze at the Rome Olympics, P.T. Usha breasting the tape fourth at the 1984 Los Angeles games. People still talk about almost winning that game against England at the Oval in 1979. Long ago, I concluded that as a nation we actually prefer the sweet sorrow of the near miss to the unfamiliar tang of victory.Yet, I can’t help but notice that something might have changed. Even as Pakistan lope toward the target the Indians refuse to give up. For the first time I can count half a dozen players in the Indian team whose shoulders never droop, who don’t look defeated. They form the core of a side that has notched up a few big wins: beating England in England two years ago, pulverizing Pakistan in last year’s World Cup, squaring a test series against mighty Australia.Perhaps it’s economic reform that has instilled this new self-confidence. When I was growing up, in Indira Gandhi’s socialist India, we were somehow aware that Pakistanis drove better cars and ate real ketchup. Our only consolation was that we made our own cars and our own crappy ketchup-so what if it tasted like pumpkin.But India now has beauty pageants and coffee bars. The average Indian has become wealthier than the average Pakistani, or at least less poor. India still makes cars and ketchup, but real cars and real ketchup. Judging by the commercials, across the border they sleep on Molty foam mattresses and wash their hair with English Anti-lice shampoo.Pakistan need 17 runs off 12 balls with four wickets in hand. Keerthi’s phone rings. “Hello…Ayo, very neck to neck now. India can lose… Ayo, bad.”Ten runs needed off eight balls. The batsman hits the ball hard and high. Two Indian fielders race toward it. One slides away at the last minute and Mohammad Kaif, the safest pair of hands in the Indian side, pounces on the ball. Out! The Pakistanis in the stadium are silent. So are we, too tense to celebrate. The man in green sits squashed against a corner of his chair, fingers locked.Nine needed off the last six balls. They get three and then it’s Sharjah all over again. Pakistan need six runs off the last ball. A pace bowler from Delhi (Ashish Nehra) will bowl to an experienced Pakistani batsman (Moin Khan). Nehra bowls. Moin swings. The ball soars into the sky-and straight into an Indian fielder’s hands.My eyes linger on the screen for a few second to make sure that it’s really over. Then I look for the man in the green shirt and open my arms. His head barely reaches my shoulder, but he lifts me below the waist and whirls me in the air — round and round and round.  Related Itemslast_img read more

Dec
2

Four Arrested in Portugal Citizenship Fraud Case

first_imgFollowing a major international operation, four members of a ring that facilitated acquisition of Portuguese citizenship for Indian citizens through fraudulent paperwork were arrested in Lisbon. The four members, natives of Mozambique and India, were given jail terms between three and six years after raids were conducted in several countries, SEF, Portugal’s Immigration and Borders Service, said.The acquisition of Portuguese citizenship allowed Indian citizens to migrate and settle in Europe. Under Portuguese citizenship law, those born in their colonies, such as Goa, and Daman and Diu, before Dec. 19, 1961 can apply for citizenship. The facility extends to their children. It has been taken up by thousands of people from the former colony in recent years. This loophole was what fraudulent networks took advantage of.“The actions of the defendants aimed at raising Indian clients willing to pay monetary amounts in order to obtain Portuguese nationality. The network provided the necessary false documentation, including birth certificates from Goa, Daman and Diu,” SEF said in a statement earlier this month.The ring reportedly charged nearly 30,000 Euros per person, and reportedly allowed entire families to avail of its fraudulent services.“There was abundant evidence that many of those who acquired Portuguese nationality had identities different from those with which they fraudulently applied to claim Portuguese nationality,” the SEF said. “It was proved that the defendants organized themselves with the objective of obtaining economic profits with the processing and instruction of requests for Portuguese citizenship by citizens of Indian origin, making use of the documents required by law if necessary.”The investigation into the network began after authorities in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom reported arrival of a large number of Portuguese citizens of Indian origin. These citizens had already requested for visa to these countries with their true identity.The international operation resulted in seizure of a large number of documents, computer equipment, mobile phones, a car, credit cards, about 20,000 Euros, and a significant amount of gold and jewelry.About 28,000 India-born UK residents with Portuguese nationality live in areas such as London, Swindon and Leicester, according to Britain’s Office for National Statistics, the Hindustan Times reported, adding that the Portuguese media quote a figure that is twice the size.These citizens are part of the Brexit discourse on the stay of European Union citizens in the United Kingdom after its exit from the EU. Related ItemsDaman and DiuGoaPortugallast_img read more

Dec
1

Police arrests Barpeta assault mastermind

first_imgThe police have arrested the prime accused in the case of allegedly assaulting a group of Muslim men in western Assam’s Barpeta and forcing them to say ‘Jai Shri Ram’, ‘Bharat Mata ki jai’ and ‘Pakistan Murdabad’ on June 18.The accused has been identified as 30-year-old Debojit Deka, a member of the right-wing Sri Ram Sena headed by the Karnataka-based Pramod Muthalik.“A joint team of Barpeta and Guwahati police caught him from a southern suburb of Guwahati close to midnight yesterday [June 21],” a senior police officer said. Video viralThe incident had come to light after a video of the forcible chanting of slogans went viral on social media. The police began searching for four people seen assaulting the Muslim men after two organisations — All Assam Minority Students’ Union and the North-East Minorities Students’ Union — filed separate First Information Reports (FIR) in Barpeta on Thursday. “We hope to catch the others involved in the incident soon,” the officer said, adding that the police’s cyber cell has been monitoring social media sites for communal or incendiary comments.last_img read more

Nov
30

PH chinlone squad catches eye of gold-medal coach

first_imgView comments Malaysia, whose 60th Independence Day coincides with its fourth SEA Games hosting, is gunning for 111 golds, the same number it did in winning the 2001 edition. PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension “The Philippines is relatively new in this sport and given time, they will be a team to watch,” said Abdullah.The Filipinos dropped the gold medal match to the host Wednesday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“This gold medal means a lot. It is the first step towards achieving our target. The players were excellent in controlling the ball. Their spirit was high,” added the Malaysian mentor.After winning the first gold of the 29th Southeast Asian Games, Malaysia sports minister YB Brig. Gen. Khairy Jamaluddin told the host’s athletes: “One down, 110 to go.” Flags of SEA Games countries raised at Athletes Village Rhemwil Catana and Johnjohn Bobier of Philippines during the Chinlone event at the 2017 SEA Games in Kuala Lumpur where Chinlone team won the 1st silver for the country.INQUIRER/ MARIANNE BERMUDEZKUALA LUMPUR—The Philippines sepak takraw chinlone team may not have won the gold, but it gained respect from the one that won it.Malaysia’s coach Mohd Yusoff Abdullah cited the Filipino’s natural flair in the sport that requires coordination and athleticism.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img Read Next LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Man sworn in as lawyer by judge who sentenced him to prison as a teen 20 years ago Reality hits PH netball athletes hard in Malaysia Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

Nov
30

Hong Kong expects Standhardinger to play full season in ABL

first_imgMOST READ Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Interestingly, the 28-year-old Standhardinger makes his ABL debut against Alab Pilipinas on Nov. 19 at Mall of Asia Arena. Sangley airport to be operational in 7 days – Tugade PLAY LIST 01:18Sangley airport to be operational in 7 days – Tugade01:10Hong Kong’s leader rejects ‘police state’ label01:44Opposition heckles lead Hong Kong leader to abandon policy speech01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Read Next ‘Mini Jalalon’ continues to impress for the Chiefs in crucial stretch LATEST STORIES Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Christian Standhardinger. Photo from Fiba.comMike Heung, vice director of the Hong Kong Eastern Long Lions, shrugged off any concerns with the status of Christian Standhardinger on the team ahead of the new ABL season.A conflict looms following the application of Standhardinger for the 2017 PBA Draft but Heung is certain that the Fil-German big man will be with the Long Lions throughout the season.ADVERTISEMENT “He signed a contract with our team and the contract he signed is for him to complete the ABL season, this season,” said Heung. “So I think a contract is a contract and he will play for us. He will play this season for us.”The 6-foot-7 Standhardinger is the consensus top pick in the draft set on Oct. 29 despite him likely to miss the 2018 Philippine Cup due to his commitments with Hong Kong.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutHeung said the addition of Standhardinger, who proved his worth in the international scene for Gilas Pilipinas in the 2017 Jones Cup, Fiba Asia Cup in Lebanon and Southeast Asian Games in Malaysia, gives the Long Lions a defensive anchor.“He’s a very good player and he can help our team a lot especially defensively.” Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary View commentslast_img read more

Nov
29

Pacman may end up fighting Alvarado

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony PLAY LIST 00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa Read Next Photo by Randolph B. LeongsonWhile Manny Pacquiao doesn’t find Mike Alvarado a palatable foe on April 14, the eight-division world champion may yet sign the contract being dangled by Top Rank promoter Bob Arum.That’s because agreeing to fight Alvarado rather than his opponent of choice, Lucas Matthysse, will assure Pacquiao of a bigger, more rewarding fight against either Terence Crawford or Vasyl Lomachenko in November.ADVERTISEMENT Padda hopes Lady Falcons find groove vs champs LATEST STORIES AFP official booed out of forum Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus MOST READcenter_img Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding “That’s going to be up to Mr. Pacquiao,” Arum said. “I’m going to be like Switzerland having both of these guys. Both can make good money fighting Pacquiao and I’m going to let Manny, assuming everything works out in April, make the decision.”Pacquiao must hurdle Alvarado first if he wants another megabuck bout. LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico And to make the offer even more enticing, Pacquiao will be given the leeway to choose between Crawford or Lomachenko, both of whom are regarded among the world’s best pound-for-pound fighters.Preferring to pit his fighters against each other, Arum has Pacquiao (59-7-2, 38 KOs) calendared to battle Alvarado (38-4, 26 KOs) in an ESPN card headlined by Crawford against Jeff Horn for the WBO welterweight crown.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe 86-year-old Arum expects Pacquiao to score an impressive win, even via knockout, over Alvarado, at Mandalay Bay Events Center.Arum told Ring TV.com that Pacquiao’s fight in the fall will be against either Crawford, provided that he beats Horn, or Lomachenko. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH View commentslast_img read more