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Aug
4

A Remarkable 100 Years

first_imgBy Torri SingerSHREWSBURY – A high-heel wearing, bridge playing, French reading, convertible driving Carlotta Niles turned 100 years old on Monday, May 27, and it was quite the party.Niles celebrated her birthday with friends and four generations of family, including six grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. The party was held at one of her favorite establishments, the New Jersey Bridge Club in West Long Branch.The essentials for such a grand birthday? Cake, champagne, great company and, of course, the magnificent Niles.Carlotta Niles, of Shrewsbury, recently celebrated her 100th birthday.It is not so much the number of years this birthday signifies but rather the life that has been built within those years that makes Niles a fascinating woman. She is vibrant and engaging with a high sense of fashion. “Oh I love big high heels, they’re wonderful,” she said, smiling with her perfectly applied red lipstick and sporting what she would consider modest 3-inch kitten heels. “I’ve always worn heels, now they’ve talked me into these little things.”At 100, Niles hasn’t missed a beat and is extremely active, regularly driving herself to the New Jersey Bridge Club to improve her game with friends; it’s one of her greatest passions and is being nurtured by her bridge instructor.Though many would agree turning 100 is a huge accomplishment in itself, hitting this birthday milestone is just one triumph among many for this unique woman. Her life is full of pause-worthy events from hot-air ballooning – nine times in seven countries – to globetrotting well into her 90s. She has visited every continent except for Antarctica and Australia. St. Petersburg, Rus­sia, is the top destination in her book. Niles said it is “simply so beautiful,” and has visited half a dozen times.Niles loves traveling. “Per­haps if you could travel, you should,” she advises. “It’s broadening … You always discover something that you didn’t know was there before.”One notable trip she took with a granddaughter was a hot-air balloon expedition in Turkey where she recalled playing tennis with banged up rackets and one tennis ball that required a lot of chasing. “That was a real hoot!” Niles laughed. A longtime lover of the sport, she played team tennis at the Seabright Lawn and Tennis Club and platform tennis at the Deal Golf Club up until a few years ago.Niles has had her fair share of raised eyebrows around the world when she told people she lives in New Jersey. “People very often get, you know, with their noses turned up at the mention of New Jersey,” said Niles, turning up her nose with a slight wave of her hand. She loves the Jersey Shore and thinks that the location – close enough to the beach and also to one of her favorite spots, New York City – is ideal.Niles prides herself in being up-to-date on the latest from art galleries and plays to museums. Until recently she made a ritual of taking the train every Wednesday to visit the Metro­politan Museum of Art and then catching a matinee at a theater – by herself.Niles’ point of view on life is straightforward and classic, just like she is. “You’ve got to march along and do the best you can. You shouldn’t upset people with your problems – they’ve got problems of their own!”A once aspiring actress and daughter of silent film star June Elvidge, Niles’ history is filled with abundant captivating details that she speaks about with nonchalance.Her father died when she was just an infant and she was raised by her grandmother who, Niles said, was, “very strict” but for whom she is extremely thankful. For a brief time Niles attended Le Conte School, which was called the “School of the Stars,“ while living in Hollywood with her mother, but ultimately return­ed to her New Jersey roots to graduate from Long Branch High School in 1930 and wed the love of her life soon after.She married in September 1931 at age 18 after years of being courted by her husband Jonathan Niles, a reporter for a local newspaper who went on to work for the Wall Street Journal. The couple settled in Red Bank.In 1935 they built their Shrewsbury home where Niles still lives today. One of her fondest spots in the world, it has a pristinely manicured garden she designed with inspiration from her many trips to France. It is the house she has walked into for more than 75 years, raised three children and returned home to from trips around the world.Niles remembers going to see Queen Elizabeth when she visited New Jersey in the summer of 1939. “My son was so excited to meet the royal family he ran all the way to the Red Bank train station and stubbed his toe!” she said.Niles has witnessed much change and history. She was 16 when the stock market crashed to begin the Great Depression. At 26, World War II began and at age 56, Neil Armstrong landed on the moon. She was 78 when the World Wide Web was invented and she is still going strong at 100.She is a woman who believes that continuing to expand knowledge is a vital element of life. “I do believe in learning,” said Niles, who regularly visits the library to pick up the latest on the best-seller’s list.Niles recognizes that she is distinct in her activity level; “so many older people close down their lives,” she said. “You’ve got to try and do something that interests you … and you mustn’t be grumpy. You must play your part and do your share!”Wise words from a woman with a century of experience to rely upon.last_img read more

Aug
4

Uber Does Not Play By The Rules

first_imgIt’s a brave new world even when you’re looking for a ride.Since 2010, first in San Francisco, California, and in 2013 in parts of New Jersey, getting home from the airport or train station or from a restaurant or bar has begun to take on a decidedly virtual reality with the advent of the Uber Smart phone app.Uber representatives are hoping for an increase in the app’s use locally since it premiered in Jersey Shore towns in May 2014, despite some objections and reservations from what could be seen as traditional competition in the transportation industry.“Monmouth County was really our focus last summer,” along with other areas on the Jersey shore, said Josh Mohrer, Uber’s general manager for New York and New Jersey. “Pick up was really, really strong.”And he expects the same to hold true for the coming warm weather. “We tell drivers from all over to head out there,” in the summer, Mohrer said, “because that’s where the action is.”Uber is a technology firm, headquartered in San Francisco, which provides a smart phone and tablet app platform connecting riders with available drivers. Since debuting in the Garden State in 2013 (in Hudson County cities—close proximity to New York City, the company’s largest market) the company has drivers totaling “in the thousands,” now according to Mohrer,“Drivers love the economic opportunity; riders love the convenience and reliability,” he maintained.While Mohrer said the cost is usually lower than traditional cabs fares, he acknowledged rides on the Jersey Shore tend to run a little higher than elsewhere, costing a base fee of $5 per ride and 30 cents per mile and $2.70 per mile, according to Uber’s website. In comparison, Yellow Car taxi service, in Red Bank, has a charge scale based upon destination zones. For example, traveling within Red Bank would cost a rider a flat rate of $3.25, or $3.75 if the trip requires crossing Maple Avenue. Traveling from Red Bank to Brookdale Community College in Lincroft would cost $12.50.What has made the company so appealing, Mohrer noted, is that, “There’s sort of the universal pain of trying to get a cab.”But what would be considered the firm and app’s natural competition—traditional limousine and taxis companies—there are other bones to pick.“There are a lot of issues we have with it, obviously,” acknowledged Gary Damanti, officer manager and cab owner and operator for Yellow Car taxi company in Red Bank.Damanti noted some company drivers have the app, “so we can see their presence around here.”Given Uber’s influence may not be what it is in northern New Jersey, but “It is starting to have an impact,” he conceded.Cabs have to have a substantial amount of insurance coverage—“We pay a lot of money for insurance,” Damanti noted—and have to pay annual licensing fees to the municipality. In Red Bank that amounts to $150 a year per vehicle.“If anybody could just come here and start doing business, what’s the point?” Damanti said. “They should follow the same rules.”That’s Bill Atkins’ argument against Uber. “In New Jersey to run a for-hire transportation service there are certain requirements,” said Atkins, owner and president of Red Bank Limousine for the last 30 years, including carrying $1.5 million of special insurance on the vehicles. “Uber is just skirting the laws,” he charged.Mohrer countered that argument by saying Uber conducts background checks on driver-applicants, provides required liability insurance for drivers and vehicles (owned and maintained by the drivers) while they’re on the platform, and inspects all vehicles to ensure they’re safe as well as clean.In addition, both drivers and riders rate their experience and that helps “keep good actors on the platform,” and “keeps the quality of service high,” Mohrer maintained.Drivers are paid per fare, based upon the time and distance of the trip. No transaction is conducted in the car; drivers have their pay deposited electronically into bank accounts at the end of the ride.Currently there isn’t much in the way of formal regulations, as technology has advanced quicker than the state legislature, Mohrer pointed out.Pending regulations, “That’s a work in progress,” he said, as Uber representatives work with state lawmakers “to come up with a regulatory framework that makes sense for this.”Damanti may be worried, and maybe rightfully so, as technology firms like this one may eventually render his business as obsolete as buggy whip manufacturers.Atkins, however, is less so. “For us it’s not even a hiccup,” he maintained, noting his business has been up over 40 percent in the last year.“We call it electronic hitchhiking,” he said, adding his customer, largely corporate executives traveling for business, would never risk missing a flight and maybe an important meeting on the chance a car wouldn’t respond to an app request.The issue at hand, he stressed, is “a lack of liability” and “fairness.”“It should be an even playing field,” Atkins believed.Certainly Mohrer is confident about the future for the business. “It’s growing very, very fast,” he said, with New Jersey “as one of our fastest growing markets“It’s very exciting for us,” he said.— By John Burtonlast_img read more

Aug
4

Voters Approve Liquor Sales in Little Silver

first_imgBy Marion LynchLITTLE SILVER – The borough’s long dry spell is about to come to an end, with voters approving the sale of the first-ever on-premise consumption liquor license.The binding referendum was approved 801-736 in unofficial results posted by the Monmouth County Clerk’s office Wednesday.Resident Matt Kelly, who collected 500 signatures on a petition last year that led to the referendum, is happy with the results.“It’s a good thing. The people have spoken and now it’s up to the council to make something that works,” he said.As a homebuilder and 11-year Little Silver resident, Kelly says he has seen the borough’s demographics change.“Why isn’t there a place to get a drink in town?” is a frequent question he hears from young families who want to move into the borough, he said.Kelly told the Two River Times last month that if the license is approved he would like to build a family-friendly restaurant and bar on the west side of the railroad tracks. Kelly, along with his brother Michael, owns Oceanport-based Kelly Builders.“Whether I’m the successful bidder or not, the community wants this. It will be great for our town, great for our social lives, to stay close to home instead of having to go out of town to socialize or have a drink with dinner while you’re with your family,” he said.Mayor Robert C. Neff Jr. said the Borough Council is ready to move ahead with an auction for the license, but there’s some work to be done before a bar can open its doors.“This is not a full-speed ahead kind of thing. We will take our time and we’ll make sure it’s done properly,” he said.The council will have to vote to amend the current alcohol control ordinance, which doesn’t permit by-the-glass sales at any establishment.“It’s important for everyone to know that there will be several public hearings,” Neff said. “People will be able to voice their concerns. It wasn’t an overwhelming victory and there are people in town who have concerns about things like location, hours of operation, and the size of the establishment. All of those things will be considered by the council and the public will have a chance to be heard.”Next, the council will work with the state Division of Alcohol Beverage Control to hold a public auction of the license. Current law limits the issuance of one license per 3,000 residents. With a population of less than 6,000, Little Silver would be limited to one license, which would go to the highest qualified bidder.Neff declined to speculate on the potential windfall for the borough’s coffers.“It’s hard to tell. We don’t know what a license may bring at public auction,” he said.There are only two places in Little Silver where liquor is sold, The Little Silver Bottle Shop, which sells beer, wine and spirits and the Acme Market, which sells unrefrigerated beer and wine. Diners are permitted to bring their own beer and wine to drink in borough restaurants.Previous attempts to pass such a measure failed – once in 1976, when the measure lost by 800 votes and most recently in 1981, when it lost by a 2 to 1 margin.“Public safety will be paramount,” Neff stressed. “Everybody with a stake in the effects that an establishment like this will have will have an opportunity to be heard.”While official tallies weren’t yet available, Neff said voter turnout appeared to be high.He said that Borough Clerk Kimberly Jungfer reported there was steady traffic throughout the day at all polling locations, and that the referendum probably generated a fair amount of interest.Neff was elected to a second term as mayor in an uncontested race, along with incumbent councilmen David Gilmour and Glenn Talavera.“It’s a special privilege to be elected to a second term because of the people I work with. I can’t say enough about our employees and the other people on the council,” he said.Local 2015 election coverage on The Two River TimesUnexpected Results in a Historically Low Turnout YearGOP Takes Red Bank By 4 VotesIncumbents Ousted in HighlandsGOP Sweeps, Other Than Stunning Angelini and Casagrande Loss‘Quixotic’ Oceanport Mayoral Attempt SucceededLocal Election ResultsVoters Approve Liquor Sales in Little SilverVIDEO: Local Candidate DebateEvery Vote Counts (Editorial)last_img read more

Aug
3

Now or never for LVR Bombers soccer team

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsIt’s now or never for the L.V. Rogers Bombers.LVR is looking for its 15th straight trip to the B.C. High School AAA Boy’s Soccer Championship Wednesday in Cranbrook when the Bombers meet the Mt Baker Wild.The one-game showdown determines the Kootenay rep at the 16-team provincial tournament. In the lone meeting this season between the two teams, Baker won 1-0.LVR finished second in the Wild tournament to go with a gold medal finish at Summerland and a 12-th place result in Chilliwack.However, LVR was missing a handful of players for the Wild tournament contest as Sean Hickson, Luis Loeschnik, Bruno Moro and Conrad Lanaway failed to make the trip.The Bombers, finishing 12th out of the 16 teams in 2009, expect to have a full roster when the teams hook up for a 1 p.m. MDT Wednesday.SIDELINES: Bomber head coach Keith Williams is looking for his tenth trip to the B.C. High School AAA Boy’s Championships. Former coaches Mike Sedlbauer and Hogue Tyler took LVR to the championship tournament for five consecutive years before Williams assume the helm.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

Aug
3

Selkirk begins to rebuild athletic program

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsKim Verigin knows it’s going to be a tough road ahead to get Selkirk back in the B.C. College Athletic Association.However, the Athletic Coordinator has never been afraid of a good fight.Selkirk informed the BCCAA executive the college will not participate in the 2011-12 season and will not be able to make a further commit until a minimum level of stability is reached.“The Saints pulled out of the current season due to low numbers, a BCCAA executive decision, and the projections of players from within the local high school programs that suggest low numbers will continue for at least another year or two,” Verigin said in a written press release.Verigin added league dynamics was also a significant factor as many BCCAA members have recently been preparing for the jump to CIS (Canadian Interuniversity Sport).“Others have made the transition from a college to university leaving only handful of two year institutions in the league,” he said.Selkirk petitioned the BCCAA executive to allow only the women’s volleyball team to participate during the 2010-11 season after it was realized that the men’s team could not fulfill its league requirements.This was due to a shortage of committed players for the upcoming season.That request was denied due to the fact that league schedules are based on both genders traveling and competing at the same time.“The premise of the program was to give local student-athletes the opportunity to compete at a very high level and to have some success . . . but if the numbers are not there, it is difficult to develop consistency,” Verigin explained.So now comes the hard part. Rebuilding a once proud and successful program.Part of the strategic plan is to support the development of programs in the region including junior and senior high school teams and club teams. “It is evident in many local schools that the number of players at the grade 8-10 levels is quite healthy,” Verigin said.  “If we can help these schools and others to encourage more participation and skill development the gap may close or disappear altogether.” In the meantime, the Saints volleyball men’s and women’s program will continue to provide committed student-athletes with a competitive two-semester schedule against colleges and universities in BC and Washington. The final event of this semester is a tournament Saturday and Sunday sponsored by the Pacific Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (PIVA) at Gonzaga University in Spokane.There was a time when the Saints volleyball program was considered one of the powers in the BCCAA.During a three-year cycle Selkirk won three consecutive Totem Conference titles (the name of the league) in 1989, 90 and 91.Selkirk also fielded teams in soccer, basketball and hockey.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

Aug
3

Kootenay Wildcats drop two close games to top ranked Fraser Valley Phantom

first_imgThe Fraser Valley Phantom needed a gritty effort to knock off Kootenay Wildcats in B.C. Female Midget AAA Hockey League action this past weekend in Langley.The Phantom, leaders of the six-team league with a 10-1-3 record, posted wins of 1-0 and 3-1 during a two-game weekend series.Kootenay, 4-9-2 on the season, is fifth in league standings.Mikayla Ogrodniczuk scored the only goal of the game late in the opening frame to spark the Phantom to the win Saturday in the series opener.Sarah Mex pitched a shutout in goal for Fraser Valley. Sunday, Kootenay got off to a great start, taking a 1-0 lead into the first period intermission on a goal by Paige Chapdelaine of Cranbrook.But Fraser Valley struck for three second-period goals — two coming in a two-minute span late in the frame — to erase the Kootenay lead.Kirsten Martin led the Phantom with two goals.Kealey McMurty, finishing the game with two points, scored the other marker for Fraser Valley.Morgan Flynn of Castlegar and Natasha Singer of Kimberley are the two Kootenay netminders.Kootenay, currently locked in a five-game losing streak, host a BC Hockey Midger AAA Hockey League tournament weekend December 13-15 in Nelson and Castlegar.The Wildcats open with a game against Prince George Courgars before facing the Phantom, West Coast Avalanche and Okanagan Rockets.The game against Okanagan is in Castlegar at the Arena Complex.last_img read more

Aug
3

Mount Sentinel Wildcats claim top prize at Rockers tourney

first_img“The bench kids stepped up as did the starters.”The Wildcats opened the four-team tourney with a 71-48 win over Salmo Falcons.Johnny Johnson, playing only one game during the tournament, led the Cats with 24 points.Saturday, Mount Sentinel defeated Nakusp Cougars 78-41. Oliver Cougar had 18 and Joe Roshinsky netted 15 to pace Mount Sentinel.The Cats have a weekend off before hosting J Lloyd Crowe Hawks of Trail, Nelson LVR Bombers and the Salmo Falcons in a mini-tourney at the South Slocan school. The Mount Sentinel Wildcats deployed a pressure defence to capture the top prize at the Stanley Humphries Rockers High School Boy’s Basketball Tournament Saturday in Castlegar.The Cats edged host Rockers 62-58 to capture the title.”We were happy with the boys considering we were missing several keys players for much of the weekend,” said coach Ed Neilsen.last_img read more

Aug
3

Mallard’s Team of the Week — Nelson Leafs Cancer Fundraisers

first_imgBlair Andrews and Brad Rebagliati raised more than $3100 for cancer research by have their heads shaved.Winger Andrews and goalie Rebagliati were joined by the rest of their Leaf teammates during a ceremony last week on the concourse of the Nelson and District Community Complex Arena.Staff at Mallard’s Source for sport would like to present the Green and White squad with Team of the Week honours.Andrews and Rebagliati are pictured with the rest of the Leafs getting a head rub from the teammates.See Nelson Home Hardware Building Centre Leaf Report. They’re all part of the Nelson Leafs hockey team but two players on the roster joined forces to raise money for a different cause — the BC Cancer Society.last_img read more

Aug
3

Wranglers rally to knock off host Cougars to claim 2016 Cyclone Taylor Cup

first_imgDom Kolbeins, with a pair, Jordan Passmore and John Kretzschmar replied for Victoria.100 Mile House, holding period leads of 1-0 and 2-1, out shot the host Cougars 38-32 in the game.Zane Steeves registered the win in goal for the Wranglers while Gregory Maggio took the loss for Victoria.The loss was the first of the tournament for the host Cougars, who opened the tournament with a 4-2 victory over the Wranglers.100 Mile House then rebounded to defeated Campbell River Storm of the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League and Mission City Outlaws of the Pacific Junior Hockey League.In the Bronze medal game, Campbell River doubled Mission City 8-4.The Wranglers, trying to follow the 2014 Cyclone Taylor, Western Canada and KIJHL Champion Beaver Valley Nitehawks, now advance to the Keystone Cup April 14-17 in Regina, Saskatchewan.First game is Thursday against Thunder Bay Northern Hawks. The 100 Mile House Wranglers is the second Kootenay International Junior Hockey League team in three years to capture the Cyclone Taylor Cup.Ryan Friesen scored in the final minute of the game, snapping a 4-4 tie to spark the Wranglers to a 5-4 victory over host Victoria Cougars in the Cyclone Taylor Championships Sunday in the Provincial Capital.Friesen scored at the tail end of the power play to give the KIJHL champs the victory. Beaver Valley is the last KIJHL team to capture the Provincial Junior B title, won in Nelson in 2014.Victoria rallied from a 2-0 first period deficit, 3-1 in the third period, scoring three consecutive goals to grab a 4-3 lead in the thrilling final.However, Brett Harris, with his second of the game, tied the contest at 4-4 with a goal 14 minutes into the final period before Friesen netted the winner.Justin Bond and Nick McCabe also scored for the Wranglers.last_img read more

Aug
2

SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO STAKES QUOTES – SUNDAY APRIL 10, 2016

first_imgNOTES: This was McAnally’s fourth San Juan win. The others were by John Henry (1980), Amerique (1998) and Interaction (2013). Winning owner Pablo Gomez resides in Garden City, New York. TYLER BAZE, QUICK CASABLANCA, WINNER: “To do it for Mr. McAnally is so great, it feels special. He got an unlucky trip last time and he’s a wonderful horse to ride, very talented and he loves long distance races and they’re my favorite. It’s a race you watch as a kid wondering if it’s a race you could ever win and to finally have the chance to do that . . . to win it, it’s fantastic.“In the paddock the only thing Mr. McAnally told me was to just gallop him the first time around. That was no problem, he’s a real cool horse, push-button, like a pony. I galloped that first mile and picked it up from there and tried to figure out how I was going to push the button because with him, it’s all or nothing. He was really flying that last three-eighths of a mile.” RON McANALLY, QUICK CASABLANCA, WINNER: “The race set up well. I just told Tyler to let him gallop past the finish line first time around. I was a little afraid going twice around on soft ground.”On winning his first race of the meet from only 14 starters: “We haven’t run that much. We don’t have those kinds of horses anymore. Charlie (Whittingham, who won the San Juan 14 times) was one of a kind. To win this race 14 times, that’s a good horseman.“This is a good horse. He’s an easy horse to ride. We just let him gallop around the first timearound, and the second time, he made that move. He had plenty left.“He’s an old horse, he’s a pro. He’s been around a long time. He’s been to Chile, he’s been to New York, he’s been to Florida. He’s one professional horse, and he’s old, like me (83).” -30-center_img TRAINER QUOTES JOCKEY QUOTES last_img read more