Jan
26

Singer visits Saint Mary’s, performs one woman musical

first_imgOn Monday, Saint Mary’s welcomed mezzo-soprano Kate Tombaugh who discussed her journey and shared career advice with students interested in musical theater. Tombaugh also performed her one woman musical, “It Just Takes One.”Tombaugh wrote, produced and starred in “It Just Takes One,” a one woman show about her journey to stage, from her first auditions in New York City, through her struggle to find the right guy and to living on her own while pursuing her dreams. The music in the show ranged from popular Broadway tunes such as “Cockeyed Optimist” from “South Pacific” to original songs and arias. Tombaugh is a mezzo-soprano, which means that vocally she has the capacity to play either a male or female role in a musical. Tombaugh has toured with a variety of opera companies and symphonies and has performed in such musicals as “Barber of Seville” and “Cinderella.”During her lecture, Tombaugh recommended that students start preparing for their careers while in college.“It’s not like one day you just wake up and say, ‘I’m a professional!’ You have to start practicing now,” she said. “This time for you is a very short blip in your career and the sooner you can start being proactive and learning how to be your own teacher and promoter, the better off you will be. There’s going to be a time where you’re out of school and you won’t have the resources like you have here.” College is the perfect “safe zone” in which students can start to realize their dreams, Tombaugh said. “I had always heard that you should create the life you imagine, but you can’t just keep seeing it as this distant thing in the future, you have to start taking tangible steps towards it,” she said.Tombaugh said students need to stop bragging, rather they should start to promote themselves effectively, as teachers, peers and colleagues can be the start of their network. “You have to decide what kind of person you want to be, and I have always known that I’m not the type of person who is comfortable throwing someone under the bus to make something happen for me,” she said. “If you start to view everyone as your asset, as your friend or network, not in a using way, but if you think, ‘their successes are my successes’ and ‘they have skill sets and information that I don’t have access to’ … then you are giving yourself a lot of power back.”Tombaugh said motivation is a key to success. “Find the happy medium in your personality,” she said. “If you are someone who is not super motivated, you have to think about ways to motivate yourself. I try to come up with a theme or mantra every year. This year, my goal is ‘simplify and streamline.’”Following one’s dreams requires effort, Tombaugh said. “Sometimes you need to just keep pushing to make something happen,” she said.   Tags: Broadway, mezzo soprano, musical theater, Operalast_img read more

Jan
26

Saint Mary’s students reflect on Iowa caucus

first_imgEvery four years, the state of Iowa holds the first contest of the presidential nominating process. The 2020 Iowa Caucus took place Monday. Iowans travelled to schools, churches and public libraries to record their votes. GRETCHEN HOPKIRK Iowans participate in the 2020 presidential caucuses on Tuesday night. While results were delayed for nearly a day due to technical problems, former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg was narrowly leading the field late Tuesday, with more than 70% of results reported.The results of this year’s caucuses were delayed due to failures in the vote-counting system and the people eagerly awaited throughout Tuesday to hear the results. The inconsistencies in the reporting of voting raised questions as to whether or not Iowa equally represented all of America. Professor William Svelmoe, the chair of the history department at the College, had a first-hand experience campaigning in Iowa. Svelmoe travelled to Iowa this past weekend in order to campaign for former South Bend mayor Pete Buttigieg. “I wanted to go and just experience Iowa. Everyone always says it’s the heart of the political universe,” he said. The excitement that citizens expressed towards going door-to-door to campaign for their candidate was a one of a kind experience for him, he said. Nevertheless, while on this journey, he discovered that not everyone in Iowa was aware of the contest: most of the blue-collar workers he encountered were unaware that the caucus was approaching; they were unable to take time off from work in order to participate. “I was reminded, which I think is important, is just how much participation in our democracy is a class-based … privilege,” he said. Some have expressed a desire to see the inaugural contest moved elsewhere in future campaign cycles. Junior Kathleen Williams, however, has no problem with the caucus taking place in Iowa. “The working-class middle class takes up the majority of the voting bloc, so it’s a good predictor when they have more of a say in voting, because they will [vote],” she said.  Sophomore Isabella Thompson-Davoli said the caucus should be moved, as to increase its visibility to a non-Iowan audience.“Sure, move it. Maybe if they moved it to a different state people would know more about it,” she said.Freshman Delaney Garabed also agreed that finding a different, more representative state would be more beneficial. “I think [they should go] to a place, [that’s] not just racially diverse, but socioeconomically diverse, like class diversity and in a place where there is just more general representation across all fronts, rather than just by race or by class,” she said.For his part, Svelmoe said he believes the caucus represents more than just a chance to vote.  “It’s so important … because whoever wins Iowa … it launches you,” he said. “It certainly gives you a huge leg up and you’re doing it with virtually all white middle-class participation.”Tags: Iowa Caucus, Politics, saint mary’slast_img read more

Jan
18

Gov. Andrew Cuomo Book On COVID-19 Response Out In October

first_imgImage via Crown Publishing Group / Andrew Cuomo Twitter.NEW YORK — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who has gained a national following through his management of the coronavirus pandemic, is writing a book that looks back on his experiences so far, and includes leadership advice and a close look at his relationship with the administration of President Donald Trump.Crown announced Tuesday that Cuomo’s “American Crisis” will be released Oct. 13, three weeks before Election Day, when Trump is expected to face presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden. The news comes the day after Cuomo addressed the Democratic National Convention and called the virus’ spread a metaphor for a country weakened by division. New York State has one of the lowest infection rates in the U.S., a welcome contrast to the spring, when it had one of the highest.The book is an unusual and risky case of reflecting on a crisis that is still ongoing, and could intensify in the fall.“In his own voice, Andrew Cuomo chronicles in ‘American Crisis’ the ingenuity and sacrifice required of so many to fight the pandemic,” according to Crown, “sharing his personal reflections and the decision-making that shaped his policy, and offers his frank accounting and assessment of his interactions with the federal government and the White House, as well as other state and local political and health officials.” Over the past few months, Cuomo has been praised for his calm but forceful demeanor, while also being accused of waiting too long to close schools and other indoor facilities, and criticized for the high number of deaths at New York nursing homes. He had said in July he was thinking of a book, commenting during a radio interview on WAMC that he wanted to document the “entire experience, because if we don’t learn from this then it will really compound the whole crisis that we’ve gone through.”In an excerpt from “American Crisis” that Crown shared with The Associated Press, Cuomo emphasized the importance of confronting fear.“The questions are what do you do with the fear and would you succumb to it,” he wrote. “I would not allow the fear to control me. The fear kept my adrenaline high and that was a positive. But I would not let the fear be a negative, and I would not spread it. Fear is a virus also.”Financial terms for “American Crisis” were not disclosed. Cuomo was represented by Washington attorney Robert Barnett, whose other clients include former President Barack Obama and former President George W. Bush. Cuomo is also the author of “All Things Possible: Setbacks and Success in Politics and Life,” which came out in 2014.Cuomo, currently serving his third term, became known to many for his blunt, straightforward press conferences, and for a time was even mentioned as a possible presidential candidate. His style has differed notably from the more erratic approach of President Trump, a Republican with whom he has clashed often. In his speech to the Democratic convention, Cuomo bemoaned the “dysfunctional and incompetent” federal response to the pandemic. Trump, meanwhile, has blamed Cuomo’s “poor management” for New York’s tens of thousands COVID-19 fatalities.Cuomo has received some of his strongest criticism for the thousands of virus-related deaths at New York nursing homes. A recent AP investigation found that the state’s death toll of nursing home patients, already among the highest in the nation, could be significantly more than reported. Unlike every other state with major outbreaks, only New York explicitly says that it counts just residents who died on nursing home property and not those who were transported to hospitals and died there.So far, Cuomo’s administration has declined to release the number. The governor has called criticism of nursing home deaths politically motivated. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Jan
18

Alexander Hanson on His Sexually Ambiguous Role in London’s Stephen Ward

first_img Were you living the dream when you starred in A Little Night Music opposite Angela Lansbury and Elaine Stritch? I remember going with Angela to the second preview of Promises, Promises and it was like going to the theater with Jesus! They all wanted to touch the hem of her garment. God, she’s a classy dame. What about Elaine? Did you send her a card for her recent 89th birthday? No, but I did send the odd message via her dresser at the time. Elaine’s not on e-mail, so communicating with her can be tricky. But God, I love her—I absolutely love her. She’s completely different from Angela. Elaine is cantankerous and moody and, of course, has diabetes. But there’s no doubt she is quite, quite brilliant. They were—and are—extraordinary ladies, both of them. And as with Joe Gillis in Sunset, Stephen Ward is narrated by a central male character who happens—semi-spoiler ahead!—to be dead. I hadn’t thought of that, but you’re absolutely right! And of course there’s the added parallel of Stephen and the young girls [Christine Keeler and Mandy Rice-Davies] for whom he’s a Svengali-type figure, which, of course, makes you also think of the Phantom. That must be an Andrew thing. Alexander Hanson has appeared in many Andrew Lloyd Webber musicals, including Aspects of Love, Sunset Boulevard and an arena tour of Jesus Christ Superstar—but only now is the actor originating a Lloyd Webber role. In Stephen Ward, Hanson plays the title character: the doomed osteopath who was at the epicenter of the Profumo sex-and-politics scandal that shook British public life a half-century ago. The ever-engaging Hanson took time to discuss the ongoing enigma that Ward remains this many years after his death and to reflect on some potent Broadway memories and a bevy of fabulous leading ladies. That must be quite empowering. It’s almost like doing a TV or a film where you are given the day’s schedule and suddenly you realize that all the dialogue’s changed. As long as the show is still in process, you can’t pin it down! You’ve done many Lloyd Webber musicals but Stephen Ward must feel a breed apart. Oh, it does! It’s certainly different from Jesus Christ Superstar, which is the most recent one that I did. I guess the most similar would be Sunset Boulevard because that had the same creative team in Don Black and Christopher Hampton. But even then, this one is more a play with music. View Commentscenter_img On some level, it’s a story of society turning in on itself. Sure, and I think the clue to understanding Stephen’s relatively short life [he died in 1963 at the age of 50] is that he just lived for high society. He loved hanging around with the movers and shakers of society—film stars and royalty and aristocracy—and he basically had three pretty powerful pass doors into that world. And because he was an exceptional osteopath, he treated the right people, so it then wasn’t a surprise when he started befriending Lord Astor and had all these young women around him. Stephen was able to make himself indispensable within the world he wanted to be in. What has it been like to open a Lloyd Webber musical cold on the West End? When I’ve taken over in the past, the show has been set and everything has been explored so you just go in and start from that point. But with a new musical it’s very fluid and also Andrew is incredibly canny. He’s a very passionate man and he cares deeply about his stuff so he knows the process whereby a song will be taken out or put in or the lyrics will change depending upon the dynamic between the piece and the audience. He also wants you as a performer to bring what you feel to the table, as well. Except that for all his love of female companionship, his sexuality remains opaque. It certainly helped that Stephen knew how to talk to women and that in his own way he was very feminine. But I think if he had actually been gay that it would have come out by now: There are plenty of guys out there who are very in tune with their femininity, particularly in our world [of the theater], who aren’t necessarily gay. Tell me about your wife, Samantha Bond, who is currently preparing to star in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels in the West End. She’s like a pig in sh*t. She’s just loving it! She’s always wanted to do a musical comedy, and that is precisely the right one for her. She’s living the dream. Were you conscious of this musical occupying an unusual place within his canon? What I realize now is that there is a certain type of [person] who comes to see a musical, whether by Andrew Lloyd Webber or anyone else, and they want dancing girls and big tunes and that’s what they want. And Stephen Ward isn’t that. It kind of subverts the Lloyd Webber genre. But then there’s another constituency who love this show because they feel it’s grown up and is dealing with a serious subject and has maybe told them something new. The older generation, in particular, come in already knowing something about the Profumo affair, and the reaction from them has been pretty amazing.last_img read more

Jan
18

Just Jim Dale Starts Previews Off-Broadway

first_img Related Shows The Just Jim Dale creative team feature set design by Anna Louizos, lighting design by Rui Rita, sound design by Carl Casella with Mark York as pianist and co-arranger and musical direction by Aaron Gandy. In Just Jim Dale, Dale recounts an unequaled lifetime in the theater and myriad irresistible showbiz tales—from a childhood performing on the British Music Hall stage, through his many Broadway triumphs in Scapino, Barnum and Me and My Girl, to his experiences narrating all seven Harry Potter audiobooks. The show is a collection of stories from Dale’s breadth of theatrical work and songs, including “The Colors of My Life” “The Lambeth Walk” and “Georgy Girl.” Just Jim Dale Tony winner, two-time Grammy winner and Oscar nominee Jim Dale’s solo show Just Jim Dale begins previews off-Broadway on May 15. Directed by Tony winner Richard Maltby, Jr, the limited engagement for the Roundabout Theatre Company is scheduled to open at the Laura Pels Theatre on June 12. View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 10, 2014last_img read more

Jan
18

54 Below Welcomes a Sweeney & Mrs. Lovett, Bonnie & Clyde and More!

first_img LAURA OSNES “The Paths Not Taken” – 12/9, 12, 13, 15 at 7PM, 12/13 at 9:30PM Patti had “Shoulda, Woulda, Coulda,” and now it’s Laura’s turn. Sure, she has a couple Tony noms and four Broadway.com Audience Choice Awards, but what about the opportunities that never came to be? Laura wades through her career to sing the songs that, perhaps in another universe, she would have gotten to sung. GET TICKETS 54 LOVES BILLY JOEL “He’s Got a Way” – 11/2 at 7PM & 11/30 at 9:30PM When are we not in the mood for a melody? The six-time Grammy winner (and Tony-winning orchestrator) gets the 54 Salute this November with a night honoring his prolific career. A four-piece band (and perhaps some high-quality vocal talent) is just what we need to put us in a “New York State of Mind.” GET TICKETS JEREMY JORDAN “Breaking Character” – 10/27-11/1, 7 at 7PM, 11/1, 11, 12, 14 at 9:30PM At last, the Broadway heartthrob makes his NYC solo show debut. Audiences can wine and dine as the Tony nominee croons some of the hits from his already stellar career: from Newsies, to Smash to The Last 5 Years and beyond, as well as some tunes from his own personal collection. GET TICKETS  View Comments PATTI LUPONE “Far Away Places Part Two” – 11/3-6, 8, 10-15 at 7PM, 11/15 at 9:30PM She’s baaaack. Having recently signed a multi-year deal with 54 Below, the two-time Tony Award winner returns with a follow-up to her acclaimed “Far Away Places.” Audiences can expect to hear some encores of performances from the first set list, as well as some new tunes from the likes of Billy Joel, David Yazbek and more. GET TICKETS JOE ICONIS “Seventh Annual Christmas Spectacular” – 12/19-20 at 8PM & 11PM The wacky New York/theater geek tradition heads to 54 Below for the first time ever! The seventh annual yuletide concert will feature tons of musical theater all-stars (plus a wasted Santa, elves, and then some) as they showcase some brand new holiday songs, some classic faves and more. ‘Tis the season to be belting! GET TICKETScenter_img It’s officially sweater weather in New York, and what better place to stay warm and toasty than midtown’s swankiest supper club? From some Broadway maggots to a milestone-hitting demon barber to Bonnie and Clyde themselves, 54 Below has some sure-to-be exciting acts lined up this season. Take a look at just some of the recently-announced nights to remember at the hottest spot in town! BROADWAY LOVES LEN “Cariou at 75” – 10/5 at 9:30PM Now—OK, later, but still soon—is the time to celebrate. Len Cariou turns 75 this fall, and his former co-stars and friends (real ones, not razors) will take the stage to pay tribute to the Tony-winning performer. Join James Earl Jones, Nathan Lane, Betty Buckley and more as they share the songs and anecdotes that made him the lovable demon barber he is. GET TICKETS THE NEWTILDAS With Paige Brady, Gabriella Pizzolo, Ripley Sobo & Ava Ulloa – 10/10 at 7PM & 9:30PM A little bit “naughty” once more! Having recently finished their runs in Matilda on Broadway, the pint-sized stars head to 54 Below for a night of showtunes and more. The four are the latest maggots to headline the intimate supper club, following original bookworm Millie Shapiro. GET TICKETS DONNY MOST “Sings and Swings!” – 10/22 at 7PM Sunday, Monday, Happy Days. Wednesday? 54 Below. The TV star brings his seven-piece band to the Broadway nightclub, where he’ll croon the tunes of Sinatra, Bobby Darin, Dean Martin and more. The Glee actor makes his NYC solo concert debut with the swingy show. We especially love him because he, like us, is really into Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups. GET TICKETSlast_img read more

Jan
18

Sandra Mae Frank & Katie Boeck on Sharing the Role of Wendla in Spring Awakening

first_img Related Shows Spring Awakening Creating a character on stage is a very personal act of transformation, which makes the double casting of Spring Awakening so unusual. Sandra Mae Frank gives a blazing performance as Wendla in Deaf West’s acclaimed Broadway revival, but because Frank is deaf, she shares the role with Katie Boeck, a soulful singer, actress and musician who becomes the voice of the young heroine. In a lively pre-show conversation (with Frank’s mile-a-minute signing voiced by an ASL interpreter), the co-stars reflected on their singular bond and joy of making their Broadway debuts.Q: First things first: What’s it like to play the same character simultaneously? KATIE: Initially, I thought I would just be standing in the band, speaking and observing, but Sandy and I developed a strong emotional connection. I feel like I am playing her conscience, exploring the subtext of the character.SANDRA: As a deaf actor, I’d rather have a voice actor sit in back and not be seen. In my experience, voice actors try to steal the stage and the focus goes to them, but Katie doesn’t do that. She is amazing, and [director] Michael Arden brought a brilliant vision of having us be together without it getting weird.KATIE: It’s an interesting acting exercise, because she’s making a lot of the character’s choices for me. I’m following her.SANDRA: And our chemistry was instant. We automatically knew how to work together and find the moments we should connect on stage. And I need her! She’s my thinking; she’s my information. She’s who is talking.KATIE: I get to be inside her mind, and on top of that, I get to play guitar and do all the things I love to do. I feel really lucky.Q: When you met, did you think, “We look nothing alike. Why have they put us together?” SANDRA: Absolutely. Look how tall and blonde she is!KATIE: I thought, this girl is sassy! I’m a little quieter. But it works better this way. Visually, people do not think we’re sisters. [As Wendla] Sandy is living in the real world, and I am her guardian angel.Q: Each of you is tackling a unique challenge in this show. Sandra, how do you experience the music on stage?SANDRA: First of all, I love musicals. I’m completely deaf, but I grew up watching musicals on television, and I told my mother, “I’m going to do a musical one day.” Spring Awakening came along, and here I am! Experiencing the process with Katie made it easier because I rely on her breathing, especially when she is singing. Breath is my “thing” for acting, and it helps me find the beat. People in the show joke, “You’re not deaf because you’re so on beat.”KATIE: Sometimes I forget that she’s deaf because she has such a remarkable sense of internal rhythm.SANDRA: This is my first musical, but I can say for sure that it’s not going to be my last.Q: Katie, how have you managed learning sign language? Are you fluent now?KATIE: Oh, I’m definitely not fluent! I spend so much time playing the guitar that I didn’t get a lot of practice signing. Sign language totally terrified me at first because my personality is based on my voice, and there was no way for Sandy to know what that sounded like. But for some reason, even before I knew any sign language, she and I were natural communicators.Q: How do you spend your days off?KATIE: We’re off on Wednesdays, so we’ve been seeing a lot of theater. We just saw The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.SANDRA: I saw it twice!KATIE: We saw Fun Home and Amazing Grace.SANDRA: I saw Something Rotten!, and I loved it so much that I went back a second time without the captions. It was so funny that I understood everything without captions.Q: What’s the best thing about making your Broadway debut?SANDRA: We’ve created a family over the past year, and now I’m on Broadway with my family.KATIE: When we first started, a lot of us [hearing actors] were like, “A musical with deaf people? Okaaay.” But I had been trying to make it in the music business for nine years, and I thought, “Well, this is a job.” Right away, we knew we had a special show. Seeing the effect on deaf audiences, on hearing audiences, has been amazing. And to share the story on a Broadway stage is incredibly rewarding. View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 24, 2016last_img read more

Jan
18

Lana Gordon to Take Over as Velma Kelly in Chicago

first_img Related Shows Lana Gordon View Comments from $49.50center_img Chicago Lana Gordon can’t do it alone! The Broadway alum will begin performances as Velma Kelly in Broadway’s Chicago on August 15. She steps in for Amra-Faye Wright in the role at the Ambassador Theatre.Gordon previously appeared on Broadway in the original casts of The Lion King and the 2000 revival of Jesus Christ Superstar. Over the last 10 years, she has performed extensively throughout Europe in various productions including Chicago as Velma Kelly, Sister Act as Deloris Van Cartier, Tarzan as Kala, West Side Story as Anita, and the title role in Carmen Cubana.The cast also currently includes Bianca Marroquín as Roxie Hart, Tom Hewitt as Billy Flynn (through August 23—Jason Danieley returns to the role on August 25), Raymond Bokhour as Amos Hart, Ron Ryan as Matron “Mama” Morton (through September 4—NaTasha Yvette Williams returns to the role on September 5), and R. Lowe as Mary Sunshine.  last_img read more

Jan
17

Monkey Grass.

first_imgWalter Reeves If you’re thinking of monkeying around with Liriope in your landscape, check out “Gardening in Georgia” Oct. 18 and 21.Host Walter Reeves will visit with Wally Pressey of Classic Groundcovers. Pressey will show many of his favorite varieties of monkey grass and mondo grass.Reeves will also visit with Randy Drinkard, a Cobb County Extension agent with the University of Georgia Extension Service. Drinkard walks Reeves through a landscape that has followed the seven principles of Xeriscaping, or water-saving landscaping.Wednesdays, Saturdays on GPTVDon’t miss “Gardening in Georgia” Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 12:30 p.m. The show is designed especially for Georgia gardeners. It’s produced by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and GPTV.last_img read more

Jan
17

Larger than Georgia.

first_imgThe tour will leave Atlanta on Aug. 18. It will include field, packing house and processing stops and a free day in Monterey before returning on Aug. 25.Anyone interested in joining the tour must register by July 25. The cost is $900 and includes all air and ground transportation. To learn more about the tour, call your county extension office. Or call Terry Kelley (wtkelley@uga.edu) at (229) 386-3410.last_img