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Jun
12

Opposition newspaper reporter gunned down two weeks before general elections

first_img RSF_en Organisation News RSF decries Cambodian plan for Chinese-style “Great Firewall” July 12, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Opposition newspaper reporter gunned down two weeks before general elections February 24, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts CambodiaAsia – Pacific CambodiaAsia – Pacific News Reporters Without Borders hopes the authorities will quickly solve yesterday’s murder of reporter Khim Sam Bo, 47, and his son, Khat Sarin Pheata, 21. Khim Sam Bo worked for Moneakseka Khmer (“Khmer Conscience”), a Khmer-language daily affiliated to the Sam Rainsy Party, Cambodia’s main opposition group. His murder came two weeks ahead of general elections.“Khim Sam Bo had written about corruption cases allegedly involving leading government associates and his editor, Dam Sith, was recently charged with libelling foreign minister Hor Namhong,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The motive for the murder has yet to be established but the context suggests it could have been a reprisal against a person who was both a reporter and an opposition activist.”The press freedom organisation added: “Allowing this murder to go unpunished would have a considerable impact on the 27 July elections and we therefore hope the investigation will produce quick results. We offer our condolences to the victims’ family.”Khat Sarin Pheata collected his father from Phnom Penh’s Olympic Stadium at around 7 p.m. yesterday after first calling in at the newspaper. As they left the stadium together on a motorcycle, they were pursued by two individuals who were also on a motorcycle. One of them fired five shots. Khim Sam Bo was hit three times and died on the spot, while his son was hit in the chest and died after being taken to hospital.The Sam Rainsy Party reacted quickly, suggesting the double murder was politically motivated. Dam Sith, Moneakseka Khmer’s editor, said he thought Khim Sam Bo was killed because of his work as a journalist. He had worked for the newspaper since 1997.Journalists are rarely murdered in Cambodia. The most recent case of a journalist being killed in connection with his work was that of Chuor Chetharith, the deputy editor of Ta Prum, a radio station linked to the opposition royalist party FUNCINPEC, who was gunned down on 18 October 2003 in Phnom Penh.center_img to go further News Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Cambodia Google experiments drop Australian media from search results News January 21, 2021 Find out more Cambodian journalist gets 20 months in jail for livestream December 28, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Jun
4

Willie O’Dea likely to be poll topper in Limerick city for…

first_imgNewsBreaking newsWillie O’Dea likely to be poll topper in Limerick city for #GE16By Staff Reporter – February 27, 2016 950 Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Previous articleLimerick decides in #GE16 as count beginsNext articleShannon aviation gathering Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Print Willie O’Dea TDWillie O’DeaAndrew [email protected] Fail outgoing TD Willie O’Dea looks set to top the poll in Limerick City as first round tallies from half of the total ballot boxes indicate that the Limerick deputy has harvested 28 per cent of the first preference votes cast on Friday.Just after 12 noon this Saturday a figure of 11,660 first preference votes were attributed to the Fianna Fail candidateAnd in a twist to the election count at such an early stage, Fine Gael’s Michael Noonan and Minister for Finance looks like he will be in a fight to retain his seat with just over 12 per cent of the first preference votes thus far leaving him marginally ahead of his party colleague Kieran O’Donnell, a AAA candidate and Labour’s Jan O’Sullivan.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Limerick city is now quite likely to have a new TD to represent the constituency as Sinn Fein’s Maurice Quinlivan already has 16 per cent of the first preference votes which leaves him just short of a quota with half of the ballot boxes still to open and be tallied.AAA candidate Cian Prendiville, who is coming off the back of an anti water charges campaign, is doing well at this stage with just over 11.4 per cent of the vote leaving him marginally ahead of Fine Gael’s Kieran O’Donnell on 11 per cent and Labour TD and Minister for Education and Skills Jan O’Sullivan.Despite Minister O’Sullivan bucking the national 7 per cent trend for Labour with her 10.45 per cent of first preference votes thus far, the outgoing Limerick TD will be in a fight for that coveted fourth seat with possibly one of the Fine Gael TDs and Cian Prendiville.In the county however, all of the ballot boxes are open and some 90 per cent of them have been tallied and again the Fianna Fail candidate is likely to top the poll based on early indications.Deputy Niall Collins has some 28 per cent of the vote and although Fine Gael have 36 per cent of the vote, it is spread evenly amongst its two candidates.The second seat is now likely to be a battle between the party stablemates in outgoing TD Patrick O’Donnovan and local councillor Tom Neville who is the son of the now retired TD Dan Neville.Polling quite strongly is the Independent candidate Emmett O’Brien who has harvested some 13 per cent of the vote leaving him ahead of Social Democrat Senator James Heffernan.Pre election suggestions that transfer votes to Emmett O’Brien will be key, now looks even more likely as the Independent looks to become a second new representative for Limerick in its two constituencies.Again it looks like three candidates will be in a close fight for the third and final seat in what is expected to be a long night at the count centre in the University of Limerick. Linkedin TAGScountDeputy Willie O’Deafeaturedgeneral electionlimerickResultsvote Facebookcenter_img Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Advertisement Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Twitter WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Email Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clashlast_img read more

May
18

ABC News Exclusive: Harvard Law student sues university over tuition prices as classes remain online

first_imgPgiam/iStockBy LAUREN LANTRY, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A Harvard Law student has filed a lawsuit against the university because tuition prices and fees have remained the same despite classes moving to remote learning due to the coronavirus pandemic.“I decided to sue Harvard because while they did make some effort … the first semester we were online to mitigate things, they just have not lowered tuition,” Abraham Barkhordar, 23, told ABC News in an exclusive interview.“They’ve actually suggested that to mitigate the difficulties of online learning that we rent office space as students,” said Barkhordar. “I just felt overall disrespected and unheard by the administration. And I think, as I’ve learned this year, the way to get justice in America is through the legal system.”In March, during the height of the pandemic and in the middle of the semester, Barkhordar said he was forced to move out of his on-campus housing with very little notice. He decided to go home, which involved flying across the country and moving back in with his parents in California, where he said disruptions were commonplace since five people were living in one home.Barkhordar said he felt like he was at a disadvantage. Since law school relies on participation, he said he had to wake up at 5 a.m. for class. And without the student spaces like the library and the study groups that usually come with a Harvard Law School education — in addition to the difficulty of learning online — he began to fall behind in class.In May, he finished his first year of law school, 3,000 miles away from the library he said he had previously “lived in.”The law school announced that classes will remain virtual into the fall while tuition will remain at $65,875 – the same price as last year.While Barkhordar’s lawsuit is strictly regarding this past spring semester, LeElle Slifer, one of the attorney’s representing Barkhordar, said they may amend the complaint later to include the upcoming fall semester. Under Massachusetts state law, a plaintiff cannot sue for an anticipated breach of contract.This past spring, most universities and colleges across the nation went remote as the novel coronavirus swept across the nation. Classes were held over Zoom, many students moved back home and most tuition prices remained unchanged.But by the end of the semester, more than 50 schools and universities faced legal complaints from students demanding that tuition or fees be refunded. Drexel University in Philadelphia, Columbia University in New York City, Michigan State, Vanderbilt, Brown, Berkley and the University of Colorado are some of the schools facing these legal challenges. In each claim, the plaintiffs — the students — center their argument around the fact that there was diminished value in an isolated, virtual education.On Monday, Harvard University joined the list of schools to be sued by its own student, who is a named plaintiff.The claimsThe lawsuit alleges three claims against Harvard, the first being a breach of contract.“Students signed up at the beginning of the semester, paid their tuition on the understanding that they would receive classes in person for the whole semester,” Slifer said. “That agreement wasn’t met. Classes went online halfway through, so that was a breach of that contract.”The second claim of the lawsuit is unjust enrichment.“By exacting the same tuition and fees from these students under these strange circumstances where you’re paying reduced overheads … ultimately, that unjustly enriches Harvard and other institutions like it because the students are paying for something that they are ultimately not getting,” Warren Burns, another attorney who represents Barkhordar, told ABC News.The third claim is conversion.“They converted that money that was for tuition into a benefit for themselves without actually giving the benefit to the students,” Slifer said.Barkhordar said he’s bringing the lawsuit against Harvard in the hope it becomes a class action lawsuit, saying he’s fully prepared and ready to represent his fellow classmates, which could be considered an injured class in court.“Plaintiff and Class Members did not intend to attend an online educational institution, but instead enrolled in Defendant’s institution on an in-person basis,” the class action lawsuit complaint says, referring to Harvard University as the defendant. “The online learning option Defendant offers is subpar in practically every aspect. The remote learning option is in no way the equivalent of the in-person education putative Class Members were promised when they committed to attend Harvard.”ABC News reached out to Harvard University, but it declined to comment on the lawsuit. In a statement on its website, the school said: “As the situation continues to change rapidly, our top priority remains the health, safety, and well-being of our community, on and off campus.” The university also lists a series of online tools students and faculty can use to help shift to remote learning.Remaining online this fallIn addition to the Law School, Harvard’s undergraduate college and some of the other graduate schools have also already announced that classes will resume online this fall to better protect the safety of its students and professors.“In light of the daily news about the continuing health risks of the pandemic … we have found it necessary to conclude that Fall Term 2020 will be online,” John Manning, the Dean of the Law School, wrote to HLS students in an email sent earlier this month.Barkhordar alleges that Harvard has actually taken away some of the mitigation efforts it put in place last spring. In the fall, he says, there won’t be unanimous pass/fail for all students, professors are not required to record their classes and the administration refused to redo registration — Barkhordar said he would have chosen classes differently had he known they would all be online. Upon hearing complaints from students regarding the struggles of online learning and the inadequacy of studying from home, Barkhordar said an administration official told students during a webinar to take out extra loans and rent office spaces to use as places to study.“Overall, it just feels awful knowing that I’ll be at a disadvantage, and that the administration has done nothing to alleviate this disadvantage for students like myself,” Barkhordar said.The Law School has dedicated “up to $1 million to support students facing challenges related to Internet access,” according to its website, and says that it is “developing an excellent online education experience” for its students. If students wanted to take a voluntary leave of absence, the deadline was extended until Monday.Other prestigious law schools, such as Stanford and Georgetown, recognizing the critical importance of diaologue and the Socratic method, have announced their classes will be in person in the fall.“The truth of the matter is we’re all in unsettled times and this is new territory for everyone,” said Burns. “But I think that calls for discretion and consideration on the part of institutions like Harvard and other schools. They really need to think about how they’re treating their students.”While Harvard is not the first school to be sued, Slifer argued that this lawsuit may set precedent for other schools.“Harvard is Harvard,” Slifer said. “It sets the tone for a lot of things that happen in the educational system in America. And if Harvard were to take that step and do the right thing by students — these are, you know, 18 to 20 something-year-olds who are taking out loans in their name — and if the university was able to cut them a discount on their tuition, I have a feeling that many schools would follow suit.”An endowment of $40.9 billion“I think the fundamental question has to be for a school with Harvard’s resources, is it fair to exact these exorbitant tuition and fees under the circumstances we’re facing?” Burns said in an interview with ABC News.Harvard has one of the largest endowments of any institution in the United States. At the end of the last fiscal year the endowment value was $40.9 billion, according to Harvard’s 2019 financial report. That is higher than over half the world’s countries’ GDP.While Barkhordar said he does receive some financial help from Harvard, he’s still had to take out loans. He said he’s paying more than $50,000 a year.“I went to community college,” said Barkhordar, who eventually transferred to the University of California, Los Angeles. “My community college had a very different financial situation than Harvard, and Harvard Law School. The school can definitely afford to mitigate things for one year. They’re not some small organization.”But Harvard’s endowment is structured. According to the financial report, “70% of the annual distribution is restricted to specific programs, departments, or purposes and must be spent in accordance with the terms set forth by the donor. Funds without donor restriction are more flexible.”According to the report, Harvard spent 5% of its endowment from 2018 to 2019, which covered 35% of its annual operating expenditures. But if Harvard increases the payout, it could result “in endowment declines and reduced distributions in the future,” the report said.But Barkhordar believes this time of crisis calls for heightened support for students from the university.“This is one of the oldest, most prestigious law schools in the world,” Barkhordar said. “And that they’re hanging their students out to dry — and that they’re suggesting us to rent office space with our own money — is frankly ridiculous. And I’m glad the justice system gives me an opportunity to stand against it.”To Burns and Slifer, Harvard’s response seems “tone deaf.”“I don’t think that Harvard is treating students fairly,” Slifer said. “I’m an alum of Harvard Law School as well. I had the opportunity to study there — all three years in person — and I think that the administration is not really recognizing how much of a burden they’re placing on some of these students.”Slifer recalled her time on campus as “a wonderful experience.” She had close, personal interactions with her professors, and politicians and Supreme Court Justices came to campus every semester.“The students aren’t getting the benefit of any of that,” said Slifer, adding that despite classes going virtual, students are “still being charged full freight.”While Slifer, Burns and their client could not comment on a potential settlement, they said they hope Harvard does “the responsible thing.”“We would like nothing better than for Harvard to do the responsible thing and take action and give some relief to their students,” Burns said. “But we’ll just have to see what form that takes.”Barkhordar — who said he wants to be a plaintiff’s lawyer upon graduation — added that he will not be intimidated by the potential repercussions.“To me it feels like a duty,” Barkhordar said. “The school has wronged us and I have an opportunity to speak up — I have the bandwidth to do so — and it feels like the right thing to do.” Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Aug
16

Bears, Browns receiving most bets to win Super Bowl

first_img Sean McVay broke down plays on TV in real time during Rams-Cowboys preseason game “It’s been kind of overwhelming, the support [for the Bears],” said Alan Berg, the senior oddsmaker for Caesars Sportsbook. “Every time the Bears go to the playoffs, the following year, the money just pours in. Everybody gets optimistic.”Right behind the Bears are the Browns, who have also received a multitude of bets to win the Super Bowl. The Bears are 9-1 to win the Super Bowl at Caesars, while the Browns are 10-1. The Patriots and Chiefs are the co-favorites with 7-1 odds and the Saints have 17-2 odds. Related News The MGM sportsbooks in Nevada reported those five teams are the only ones that have brought in more than $1 million worth of bets. Much of the Bears and Browns’ high bet rates have to do with their young quarterbacks. Chicago quarterback Mitchell Trubisky and Cleveland QB Baker Mayfield are the most popular choices to win league MVP.Trubisky’s MVP odds are 22-1 at Caesars, while he has 50-1 odds at the SuperBook at Westgate Las Vegas. “The support from Trubisky has been ridiculous,” Berg said. “Trubisky, at 22-1, is an insane number.”Interestingly, the Philadelphia and New Jersey sports books have received the most bets on the Eagles winning the Super Bowl, with more than half the bets tabbing Philadelphia quarterback Carson Wentz as NFL MVP. Both DraftKings and FanDuel, the two largest sportsbooks in New Jersey, have the Eagles coming out on top. DraftKings has the Eagles winning the Super Bowl with 13-1 odds, with Wentz taking home MVP honors with 14-1 odds.”It makes sense,” DraftKings sportsbook director Johnny Avello said. “It matters where you’re located and if you’re pretty good, and the Eagles look like a pretty good team.”In Las Vegas, the Eagles are roughly in the middle to win the Super Bowl. Seahawks upbeat over DK Metcalf despite receiver requiring knee surgery Could the Bears finally earn their first Super Bowl win since 1985? Many bettors think so.Multiple Las Vegas sportsbooks have reported ( via ESPN ) that the Bears have received the most bets to win Super Bowl 54. NFL players, owners willing to expand playoff field for next CBA, reports saylast_img read more

Aug
13

Celtics’ Jaylen Brown drove 15 hours to lead peaceful protest in Atlanta

first_img“I drove 15 hours to get to Georgia, my community,” Brown said in an Instagram video.”Being a celebrity, being an NBA player doesn’t exclude me from no conversation at all. First and foremost, I’m a black man and I’m a member of this community. … We’re raising awareness for some of the injustices that we’ve been seeing. It’s not OK.” MORE: Sports reactions stress unity, actionFloyd’s death Monday has sparked protests against police brutality, as well as riots, in cities across the United States. A post shared by جيلين براون (@fchwpo) on May 30, 2020 at 3:23pm PDTTimberwolves star Karl-Anthony Towns, teammate Josh Okogie and former NBA player Stephen Jackson, a longtime friend of Floyd’s, took part in a demonstration Friday in Minneapolis. Celtics guard Jaylen Brown said he drove 15 hours from Boston to his home state of Georgia to lead a peaceful protest Saturday in response to the death of George Floyd.Brown, who streamed part of the march live via his Instagram account, marched with a megaphone while holding a sign that read “I Can’t Breathe,” a reference to Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who pleaded he could not breathe while a white former Minnesota police officer knelt on his neck. View this post on Instagramlast_img read more

Aug
4

A Remarkable 100 Years

first_imgBy Torri SingerSHREWSBURY – A high-heel wearing, bridge playing, French reading, convertible driving Carlotta Niles turned 100 years old on Monday, May 27, and it was quite the party.Niles celebrated her birthday with friends and four generations of family, including six grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. The party was held at one of her favorite establishments, the New Jersey Bridge Club in West Long Branch.The essentials for such a grand birthday? Cake, champagne, great company and, of course, the magnificent Niles.Carlotta Niles, of Shrewsbury, recently celebrated her 100th birthday.It is not so much the number of years this birthday signifies but rather the life that has been built within those years that makes Niles a fascinating woman. She is vibrant and engaging with a high sense of fashion. “Oh I love big high heels, they’re wonderful,” she said, smiling with her perfectly applied red lipstick and sporting what she would consider modest 3-inch kitten heels. “I’ve always worn heels, now they’ve talked me into these little things.”At 100, Niles hasn’t missed a beat and is extremely active, regularly driving herself to the New Jersey Bridge Club to improve her game with friends; it’s one of her greatest passions and is being nurtured by her bridge instructor.Though many would agree turning 100 is a huge accomplishment in itself, hitting this birthday milestone is just one triumph among many for this unique woman. Her life is full of pause-worthy events from hot-air ballooning – nine times in seven countries – to globetrotting well into her 90s. She has visited every continent except for Antarctica and Australia. St. Petersburg, Rus­sia, is the top destination in her book. Niles said it is “simply so beautiful,” and has visited half a dozen times.Niles loves traveling. “Per­haps if you could travel, you should,” she advises. “It’s broadening … You always discover something that you didn’t know was there before.”One notable trip she took with a granddaughter was a hot-air balloon expedition in Turkey where she recalled playing tennis with banged up rackets and one tennis ball that required a lot of chasing. “That was a real hoot!” Niles laughed. A longtime lover of the sport, she played team tennis at the Seabright Lawn and Tennis Club and platform tennis at the Deal Golf Club up until a few years ago.Niles has had her fair share of raised eyebrows around the world when she told people she lives in New Jersey. “People very often get, you know, with their noses turned up at the mention of New Jersey,” said Niles, turning up her nose with a slight wave of her hand. She loves the Jersey Shore and thinks that the location – close enough to the beach and also to one of her favorite spots, New York City – is ideal.Niles prides herself in being up-to-date on the latest from art galleries and plays to museums. Until recently she made a ritual of taking the train every Wednesday to visit the Metro­politan Museum of Art and then catching a matinee at a theater – by herself.Niles’ point of view on life is straightforward and classic, just like she is. “You’ve got to march along and do the best you can. You shouldn’t upset people with your problems – they’ve got problems of their own!”A once aspiring actress and daughter of silent film star June Elvidge, Niles’ history is filled with abundant captivating details that she speaks about with nonchalance.Her father died when she was just an infant and she was raised by her grandmother who, Niles said, was, “very strict” but for whom she is extremely thankful. For a brief time Niles attended Le Conte School, which was called the “School of the Stars,“ while living in Hollywood with her mother, but ultimately return­ed to her New Jersey roots to graduate from Long Branch High School in 1930 and wed the love of her life soon after.She married in September 1931 at age 18 after years of being courted by her husband Jonathan Niles, a reporter for a local newspaper who went on to work for the Wall Street Journal. The couple settled in Red Bank.In 1935 they built their Shrewsbury home where Niles still lives today. One of her fondest spots in the world, it has a pristinely manicured garden she designed with inspiration from her many trips to France. It is the house she has walked into for more than 75 years, raised three children and returned home to from trips around the world.Niles remembers going to see Queen Elizabeth when she visited New Jersey in the summer of 1939. “My son was so excited to meet the royal family he ran all the way to the Red Bank train station and stubbed his toe!” she said.Niles has witnessed much change and history. She was 16 when the stock market crashed to begin the Great Depression. At 26, World War II began and at age 56, Neil Armstrong landed on the moon. She was 78 when the World Wide Web was invented and she is still going strong at 100.She is a woman who believes that continuing to expand knowledge is a vital element of life. “I do believe in learning,” said Niles, who regularly visits the library to pick up the latest on the best-seller’s list.Niles recognizes that she is distinct in her activity level; “so many older people close down their lives,” she said. “You’ve got to try and do something that interests you … and you mustn’t be grumpy. You must play your part and do your share!”Wise words from a woman with a century of experience to rely upon.last_img read more

Aug
4

Uber Does Not Play By The Rules

first_imgIt’s a brave new world even when you’re looking for a ride.Since 2010, first in San Francisco, California, and in 2013 in parts of New Jersey, getting home from the airport or train station or from a restaurant or bar has begun to take on a decidedly virtual reality with the advent of the Uber Smart phone app.Uber representatives are hoping for an increase in the app’s use locally since it premiered in Jersey Shore towns in May 2014, despite some objections and reservations from what could be seen as traditional competition in the transportation industry.“Monmouth County was really our focus last summer,” along with other areas on the Jersey shore, said Josh Mohrer, Uber’s general manager for New York and New Jersey. “Pick up was really, really strong.”And he expects the same to hold true for the coming warm weather. “We tell drivers from all over to head out there,” in the summer, Mohrer said, “because that’s where the action is.”Uber is a technology firm, headquartered in San Francisco, which provides a smart phone and tablet app platform connecting riders with available drivers. Since debuting in the Garden State in 2013 (in Hudson County cities—close proximity to New York City, the company’s largest market) the company has drivers totaling “in the thousands,” now according to Mohrer,“Drivers love the economic opportunity; riders love the convenience and reliability,” he maintained.While Mohrer said the cost is usually lower than traditional cabs fares, he acknowledged rides on the Jersey Shore tend to run a little higher than elsewhere, costing a base fee of $5 per ride and 30 cents per mile and $2.70 per mile, according to Uber’s website. In comparison, Yellow Car taxi service, in Red Bank, has a charge scale based upon destination zones. For example, traveling within Red Bank would cost a rider a flat rate of $3.25, or $3.75 if the trip requires crossing Maple Avenue. Traveling from Red Bank to Brookdale Community College in Lincroft would cost $12.50.What has made the company so appealing, Mohrer noted, is that, “There’s sort of the universal pain of trying to get a cab.”But what would be considered the firm and app’s natural competition—traditional limousine and taxis companies—there are other bones to pick.“There are a lot of issues we have with it, obviously,” acknowledged Gary Damanti, officer manager and cab owner and operator for Yellow Car taxi company in Red Bank.Damanti noted some company drivers have the app, “so we can see their presence around here.”Given Uber’s influence may not be what it is in northern New Jersey, but “It is starting to have an impact,” he conceded.Cabs have to have a substantial amount of insurance coverage—“We pay a lot of money for insurance,” Damanti noted—and have to pay annual licensing fees to the municipality. In Red Bank that amounts to $150 a year per vehicle.“If anybody could just come here and start doing business, what’s the point?” Damanti said. “They should follow the same rules.”That’s Bill Atkins’ argument against Uber. “In New Jersey to run a for-hire transportation service there are certain requirements,” said Atkins, owner and president of Red Bank Limousine for the last 30 years, including carrying $1.5 million of special insurance on the vehicles. “Uber is just skirting the laws,” he charged.Mohrer countered that argument by saying Uber conducts background checks on driver-applicants, provides required liability insurance for drivers and vehicles (owned and maintained by the drivers) while they’re on the platform, and inspects all vehicles to ensure they’re safe as well as clean.In addition, both drivers and riders rate their experience and that helps “keep good actors on the platform,” and “keeps the quality of service high,” Mohrer maintained.Drivers are paid per fare, based upon the time and distance of the trip. No transaction is conducted in the car; drivers have their pay deposited electronically into bank accounts at the end of the ride.Currently there isn’t much in the way of formal regulations, as technology has advanced quicker than the state legislature, Mohrer pointed out.Pending regulations, “That’s a work in progress,” he said, as Uber representatives work with state lawmakers “to come up with a regulatory framework that makes sense for this.”Damanti may be worried, and maybe rightfully so, as technology firms like this one may eventually render his business as obsolete as buggy whip manufacturers.Atkins, however, is less so. “For us it’s not even a hiccup,” he maintained, noting his business has been up over 40 percent in the last year.“We call it electronic hitchhiking,” he said, adding his customer, largely corporate executives traveling for business, would never risk missing a flight and maybe an important meeting on the chance a car wouldn’t respond to an app request.The issue at hand, he stressed, is “a lack of liability” and “fairness.”“It should be an even playing field,” Atkins believed.Certainly Mohrer is confident about the future for the business. “It’s growing very, very fast,” he said, with New Jersey “as one of our fastest growing markets“It’s very exciting for us,” he said.— By John Burtonlast_img read more

Aug
3

Now or never for LVR Bombers soccer team

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsIt’s now or never for the L.V. Rogers Bombers.LVR is looking for its 15th straight trip to the B.C. High School AAA Boy’s Soccer Championship Wednesday in Cranbrook when the Bombers meet the Mt Baker Wild.The one-game showdown determines the Kootenay rep at the 16-team provincial tournament. In the lone meeting this season between the two teams, Baker won 1-0.LVR finished second in the Wild tournament to go with a gold medal finish at Summerland and a 12-th place result in Chilliwack.However, LVR was missing a handful of players for the Wild tournament contest as Sean Hickson, Luis Loeschnik, Bruno Moro and Conrad Lanaway failed to make the trip.The Bombers, finishing 12th out of the 16 teams in 2009, expect to have a full roster when the teams hook up for a 1 p.m. MDT Wednesday.SIDELINES: Bomber head coach Keith Williams is looking for his tenth trip to the B.C. High School AAA Boy’s Championships. Former coaches Mike Sedlbauer and Hogue Tyler took LVR to the championship tournament for five consecutive years before Williams assume the [email protected]last_img read more

Aug
3

Kootenay Wildcats drop two close games to top ranked Fraser Valley Phantom

first_imgThe Fraser Valley Phantom needed a gritty effort to knock off Kootenay Wildcats in B.C. Female Midget AAA Hockey League action this past weekend in Langley.The Phantom, leaders of the six-team league with a 10-1-3 record, posted wins of 1-0 and 3-1 during a two-game weekend series.Kootenay, 4-9-2 on the season, is fifth in league standings.Mikayla Ogrodniczuk scored the only goal of the game late in the opening frame to spark the Phantom to the win Saturday in the series opener.Sarah Mex pitched a shutout in goal for Fraser Valley. Sunday, Kootenay got off to a great start, taking a 1-0 lead into the first period intermission on a goal by Paige Chapdelaine of Cranbrook.But Fraser Valley struck for three second-period goals — two coming in a two-minute span late in the frame — to erase the Kootenay lead.Kirsten Martin led the Phantom with two goals.Kealey McMurty, finishing the game with two points, scored the other marker for Fraser Valley.Morgan Flynn of Castlegar and Natasha Singer of Kimberley are the two Kootenay netminders.Kootenay, currently locked in a five-game losing streak, host a BC Hockey Midger AAA Hockey League tournament weekend December 13-15 in Nelson and Castlegar.The Wildcats open with a game against Prince George Courgars before facing the Phantom, West Coast Avalanche and Okanagan Rockets.The game against Okanagan is in Castlegar at the Arena Complex.last_img read more

Aug
2

PERFECT PIC PULLS OFF FRONT-RUNNING HEIST AS SHE WINS $58,000 SANTA ANITA ALLOWANCE FEATURE BY A NECK; CASSIDY & GONZALEZ TEAM FOR MILE TURF WIN IN 1:36.47

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Feb. 3, 2017)–Canadian-bred Perfect Pic slowed the early pace to a veritable crawl en route to a game neck win in Friday’s $58,000 allowance feature under Santiago Gonzalez. Trained by Jim Cassidy, Perfect Pic tried turf for the first time and got a flat mile over a firm Santa Anita surface in 1:36.47.Well beaten in the Grade I, seven furlong La Brea Stakes here Dec. 26, the 4-year-old Ontario Canadian-bred filly by Candy Ride took a first condition allowance going a mile and a sixteenth over a muddy surface on Jan. 13 and was off at 5-1 today in a field of seven older fillies and mares. She paid $13.40, $5.40 and $4.80.“The jock came out to the paddock and said ‘No speed, boss,’” related Cassidy. “I told him, ‘Slow, slow, slow.’ And that’s what happened.”Owned by Deron Pearson’s DP Racing, Perfect Pic got her third win from six starts and with the winner’s check of $34,800, increased her earnings to $125,945.French-bred Sweet Charity, who showed ample promise in her U.S. debut on Jan. 1, sat second the entire trip but couldn’t overcome the dawdling early pace, finishing second, a neck in front of Sheeza Milky Way.Off at 6-5 with Rafael Bejarano up, Sweet Charity paid $3.20 and $2.40.Sheeza Milky Way, who was ridden by Jamie Theriot, sat a close second at the rail throughout, tried to get on terms inside the winner a sixteenth out, but had to settle for third money while finishing     2 ¼ lengths in front of graded stakes winning Cheekaboo.Off at 8-1, Sheeza Milky Way paid $4.00 to show.Fractions on the race were 25.10, 49.57, 1:13.55 and 1:24.90.Santa Anita will present three graded stakes on a nine-race card Saturday, with first post time at 12:30 p.m.last_img read more