Category Archives

Archive of posts published in the category: frcniyaz
Jul
12

Intravenous Infusions Limited (IIL.gh) 2017 Annual Report

first_imgIntravenous Infusions Limited (IIL.gh) listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange under the Pharmaceuticals sector has released it’s 2017 annual report.For more information about Intravenous Infusions Limited (IIL.gh) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Intravenous Infusions Limited (IIL.gh) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Intravenous Infusions Limited (IIL.gh)  2017 annual report.Company ProfileIntravenous Infusions Limited (IIL) was incorporated in 1969 and began operations in 1974 as the first pharmaceutical company producing intravenous fluids in Ghana. The main business activity of IIL is the production of intravenous infusions for therapeutic purposes. Intravenous infusion therapy, commonly called IV, refers to the administration of fluids, drugs, or blood directly into the circulatory system through a vein. Intravenous Infusions Limited is listed on the Ghana Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Jun
20

Catholic bishops narrowly reject a wider welcome to gays, divorcees

first_img Anglican Communion, Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Featured Jobs & Calls Catherine Cheek says: By Josephine McKennaPosted Oct 20, 2014 Rector Knoxville, TN Michael Grear says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL [Religion News Service – Vatican City] Catholic bishops meeting here narrowly defeated proposals that would have signaled greater acceptance of gays and lesbians and divorced Catholics, a sign of the deep divisions facing the hierarchy as Pope Francis continues his push for a more open church.While the various proposals received a majority of support from the bishops gathered for the Synod on the Family, they failed on Saturday (Oct. 18) to receive the required two-thirds majority that would have carried the weight of formal approval and churchwide consensus.Saturday’s vote was an abrupt about-face from Monday’s mid-term report from the Synod, which spoke of “welcoming homosexual persons” and acknowledging the gifts they have to offer the wider church.The revised proposal on homosexuality, that “men and women with homosexual tendencies should be welcomed with respect and delicacy,” failed in a vote of 118 to 62; a similar statement about opening Communion to divorced Catholics who remarry outside the church failed in a vote of 104-74.Despite the divide, Francis received a standing ovation that lasted several minutes in his final address to the Synod, where he had called for  “sincere and open” debate.After days in which divisions inside the Vatican spilled over into the press, the pope described the two-week summit as a “journey together,” and like any human journey, one that featured moments of “desolation, tension and temptations”.He said the role of the pope was to guarantee the unity of the church, and that he would have been “very worried and saddened if there had not been these temptations and animated discussions.”Even though the sections on homosexuality and divorce did not pass with formal approval, Francis ordered them into the Synod’s final report so that Catholics could continue to debate the ideas.Saturday’s vote, however, is not the final word. Francis plans to host a follow-up summit a year from now, and both sides are expected to spend the next 12 months trying to either reinforce existing policy or trying to nudge the bishops toward a more open approach.Nonetheless, the closeness of the votes reflected a deep divide within the hierarchy that erupted into the open after Monday’s gesture toward gay Catholics.  After a vocal conservative revolt, English-speaking bishops pressed to change the wording from “welcoming” to  “providing for homosexual persons”.Catholic reformers and gay groups wasted no time in expressing their disappointment. The progressive reform group Call To Action said the bishops’ report showed “positive steps” but also “missed opportunities.”“It’s disappointing that some in the institutional church are not yet ready to welcome all God’s children to the table,” said Jim FitzGerald, the group’s executive director.Francis DeBernardo, executive director of New Ways Ministry, a Maryland-based gay Catholic group that’s often at odds with the hierarchy, was disappointed that the bishops’ final report overturned the “gracious welcome” issued to gays earlier in the week.“Instead, the bishops have taken a narrow view of pastoral care by defining it simply as opposition to marriage for same-gender couples,” he said in a statement, adding that the bishops had failed to take account of those gays who receive “unjust and oppressive treatment” from governments, church, families, and society.At a Vatican media conference earlier Saturday, Cardinal Oswald Gracias of Mumbai, India, insisted there was “no cleavage,” or divide, among the bishops, and that gays and lesbians were welcome in the church.“Are gays welcome? I would say certainly, they are part of the church,” he said. “There’s no question of condemnation. I would say we are working together.”American Cardinal Raymond Burke, the conservative former archbishop of St. Louis who now heads the Vatican’s highest court, earlier blasted Francis for allowing the synod’s message to stray from official church teaching, especially on homosexuality.“The pope, more than anyone else as the pastor of the universal church, is bound to serve the truth,” Burke told BuzzFeed from Rome. “The pope is not free to change the church’s teachings with regard to the immorality of homosexual acts or the insolubility of marriage or any other doctrine of the faith.”Burke also acknowledged rumors that Francis is poised to demote the fiery conservative to a ceremonial post far away from the church’s center of power.“I very much have enjoyed and have been happy to give this service, so it is a disappointment to leave it,” Burke said. “On the other hand, in the church as priests, we always have to be ready to accept whatever assignment we’re given. And so I trust, by accepting this assignment, I trust that God will bless me, and that’s what’s in the end most important.”Asked by the National Catholic Reporter who had told him of the pending demotion, Burke replied: “Who do you think?” Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ecumenical & Interreligious, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Human Sexuality Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET October 20, 2014 at 4:50 pm Although I am not a Roman Catholic, I do have an opinion about this. The RC church needs to understand that things are never black or white. A person should not be scorned for getting a divorce. Sure, it isn’t a good thing. But sometimes it is inevitable. I just can’t believe our Lord would want any of His children to live their lives being abused, just because they want to be able to take the Sacrament.As for homosexuals, no one has a right to judge them, or keep them out of our churches. Some of the clergy in our parish are gay, and they are some of the nicest people I know. You can feel God’s spirit within them. If the Episcopal Church banned gays, Trinity Church (Columbus, OH) would miss out on the kindness and compassion of these people who help the poor, tend the sick, and fight for human rights and dignity. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 October 21, 2014 at 8:26 pm genesis 1 G=d put everything in complimentary polar opposites…dont’ confuse the Absolute of Love, which the church has never had any problem with…the issue is the Absolute of orgasm Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC October 21, 2014 at 6:57 pm To the RC bishops who voted, “No,” on being more welcoming to gays; please, answer this simple question:“How old were you when you choose your sexuality, and how did you choose heterosexuality over homosexuality?”God has never granted a choice on this issue. Both are just different gifts which only He, can and will, explain upon our deaths…with divine love…as to why He gave both to the world. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Susan Zimmerman says: Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Catholic bishops narrowly reject a wider welcome to gays, divorcees Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Comments (3) Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PAlast_img read more

Jun
20

Rhode Island churches offer warmth during gas outage

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Rhode Island churches offer warmth during gas outage Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted Jan 23, 2019 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Diocese of Rhode Island] Episcopal churches on Aquidneck Island responded Tuesday to the state of emergency that left more than 7,000 National Grid customers in Newport and Middletown without natural gas for heat.As one example, St. John’s, Newport, sent a special edition of its e-newsletter to spread the word that its church and Guild Hall would be “open and warm all night.” The church noted that it was not an “official” warming center but would “welcome you to come in if needed.”National Grid estimated it would take a week or more to restore service to all those affected.Read news coverage of the outage here. Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

Jun
17

Casa PH2 / DX Arquitectos

first_img Area:  184 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Projects ArchDaily Year:  Houses Casa PH2 / DX Arquitectos ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/907578/casa-ph2-dx-arquitectos Clipboard Casa PH2 / DX ArquitectosSave this projectSaveCasa PH2 / DX Arquitectos “COPY” Chile CopyHouses•Padre Hurtado, Chilecenter_img Architects: DX Arquitectos Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/907578/casa-ph2-dx-arquitectos Clipboard Save this picture!© Pablo Blanco+ 17Curated by Danae Santibañez Share Photographs Manufacturers: Arauco, Cintac®, Passol, VolcanAuthor Architects:Juan Luzoro, Federico NovoaCollaborator:Pablo HipReckoner:Rodrigo BravoCity:Padre HurtadoCountry:ChileMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Pablo BlancoRecommended ProductsDoorsSaliceSliding Door System – Slider S20Windowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityWoodBruagBalcony BalustradesWoodParklex International S.L.Wood cladding – FacadeText description provided by the architects. The house PH2 is a three-slope monovolume, fully dressed in the rusty tin on site, material taken from the rural environment, where agro-industrial buildings abound in various states of destruction. This “architecture without architects” that benefits from the lack of pretension serves us as a material reference, delimiting a stripped and essential formal language.Save this picture!SketchThe history of its development establishes a reflection on the individuality of the assignment and the traffic of ideas that go from one project to another. We made two previous versions of this house, which both were out of what the principal was willing to spend, facing the cessation of the project, we wanted to rethink it based on a scheme proposed several years earlier in the form of the “Chilean House for a Gringo “.Save this picture!© Pablo BlancoSave this picture!Ground Floor Plan and ElevationsSave this picture!© Pablo BlancoA habitat limited to the iconic and pragmatic needs in an indistinct environment. A postmodern version of the Maison Domino by Le Corbusier to carry in your pocket and install at your leisure.Save this picture!© Pablo BlancoSave this picture!Roof Plan and SectionsSave this picture!© Pablo BlancoProject gallerySee allShow lessGlyn House / Yellow Cloud StudioSelected ProjectsHouse H / KC Design StudioSelected Projects Share “COPY” Photographs:  Pablo Blanco Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project 2016 CopyAbout this officeDX ArquitectosOfficeFollowProductsSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesPadre HurtadoChilePublished on August 15, 2020Cite: “Casa PH2 / DX Arquitectos” [Casa PH2 / DX Arquitectos] 14 Aug 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodHow to Design a Façade with AluProfile Vertical ProfilesGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisOxidized Copper: Nordic BrownDoorsEGGERWood Laminate Doors in Molecular Plant Science InstituteStonesCosentinoSurfaces – Silestone® Nebula SeriesWall / Ceiling LightsLouis PoulsenLamp – LP RiplsWood Boards / HPL PanelsBruagRoom Dividers – Partition Wall MDFStonesNeolithSintered Stone – Mar del PlataWindowspanoramah!®ah! SecurityPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsMIS Facade PanelCarpetsFabromont AGTextile Floor Covering – Orbital® 07 COLORpunkt®LightsNorka lightingLuminaire – BelfastMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?PH2住宅 / DX Arquitectos是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Jun
16

Buzz Schmidt on GuideStar’s first ten years

first_img This month’s Alliance Extra magazine features an interview with Buzz Schmidt, founder of GuideStar, the web-based database of nonprofit organisations’ information.After ten years of operating in the USA, GuideStar has now spawned a UK version, and could follow this with sites in India, South Africa, Hungary, Germany, Israel and Palestine. The service aims to provide good-quality information about a large number of a country’s civil society organisations in accessible and searchable form and free of charge.In his interview with Alliance Extra, Buzz Schmidt, GuideStar’s founder, explains what GuideStar can offer the nonprofit sector, and how the organisation faces issues such as quality of data and who will fund its future development. Advertisement Buzz Schmidt on GuideStar’s first ten years Tagged with: Digital Giving/Philanthropy Recruitment / people AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 3 April 2006 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Jun
16

Workplace Giving UK voted best in the business

first_img  33 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Workplace Giving UK voted best in the business Howard Lake | 13 October 2009 | News O’ Hara thinks getting the message out there about the tax efficiencies of Workplace Giving is vital. “It’s a contemporary way to donate to charity. All Workplace Giving is tax efficient, especially for the higher rate tax payer. It is easy to give this way and it is flexible, so any charity can be nominated. Our most common problem continues to be a lack of awareness of the scheme”.The awards were handed out by the Minister for the Third Sector, the Rt. Hon. Angela Smith MP and Financial Secretary, the Rt. Hon. Stephen Timms MP. Other winners were Haygarth, the London based integrated marketing agency . They won ‘Best SME Campaign’. Flight Centre, the Surrey based travel team, were highly commended in the ‘Best Launch of a New Scheme’ category.A new award this year for ’Best Public Sector Employer Campaign’ saw Workplace Giving UK’s client London Borough of Islington come out on top.Between them, these companies have raised nearly £100,000 for charity in this year alone. This is more remarkable given the current economic climate and atmosphere of ongoing redundancies within many workplaces during the last 12 months. Peter O’Hara believes that “in our experience, when the chips are down and people are being made redundant, those lucky enough to be in work still are more likely to want to help others. That’s why, despite the doom and gloom of 2009, we are finding that employees are still incredibly generous”Notes for Editors:If you would like to have individual case studies and interviews from the winning companies, please let us know and we will arrange this for you. Photos availableWorkplace Giving is a simple, tax efficient, scheme which allows employees to give to any charity they choose by having a deduction taken straight from their gross pay. Workplace Giving is also known as Payroll Giving or Give As You Earn.A £10 donation through the scheme, would cost a standard rate taxpayer £8 or a higher rate tax payer £6.Workplace Giving is the only way for a higher rate tax payer to pass their 40% tax straight to their chosen cause as only the basic rate of tax can be claimed back by charities under the Gift Aid scheme.From April 2010 a £10 donation would only cost £5 for those paying 50% tax.For more information visit www.workplacegiving-uk.comFor interviews please contact:[email protected]@lilypadpr.co.uk0844 351 1484 Tagged with: Awards legacies payroll giving tax efficient givingcenter_img Once again, Workplace Giving UK’s clients swept the board at the National Payroll Giving Excellence Awards held at the Treasury this week. Awards included ‘The Most Successful Payroll Giving Promotion’ (which is a bit like Best in Show) and is chosen from all the category winners. This was for its partnership with Beaverbrooks, the high street jeweller who also won ‘Best Launch of a New Scheme’. That’s a hat trick for Workplace Giving UK as it has won this category since the awards began in 2006.Managing Director Peter O’Hara, who was voted one of the country’s top twenty ‘most influential’ fundraisers this year, was delighted by last night’s results. He believes that “creativity, passion and enthusiasm are all essential ingredients in the team’s success, but most of all it’s our belief in delivering for charities which drives us.“Workplace Giving UK has been responsible for raising over £15 million for charity since the company began five years ago and has won a host of sector and industry awards for themselves and their clients. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Jun
14

EPA’s McCarthy Says Clean Water Rule Will be Finalized

first_img SHARE SHARE By Gary Truitt – Apr 14, 2015 Facebook Twitter The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Chairs introduced legislation this week to stop EPA from finalizing the clean water rule it sent to the Office of Management and Budget last week – according to The Hagstrom Report. House Ag Chair Michael Conaway is an original sponsor of the bill. Conaway says the U.S. Supreme Court rebuked EPA twice for overstepping its bounds – but the Administration’s response was to double down.House Ag Ranking Member Collin Peterson says EPA’s proposed rule has the potential to regulate farmers and ranchers out of business – putting the entire rural economy in jeopardy. Peterson says this new legislation is needed because EPA does not seem to grasp the real-world impact the rule would have on farmers and local communities. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy – however – says the agency will get the rule over the finish line – and the final rule will provide the clarity people want – ensuring not to overextend into agriculture. Previous article4-H Students Present before House Agriculture CommitteeNext articleTPA Likely to be Introduced This Week Gary Truitt Home Indiana Agriculture News EPA’s McCarthy Says Clean Water Rule Will be Finalized EPA’s McCarthy Says Clean Water Rule Will be Finalized Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Jun
2

Stock indexes wobble as investor caution offsets optimism

first_imgLocal NewsBusinessUS News TAGS  Pinterest Facebook Previous articleNHL-leading Maple Leafs beat Canadiens 4-2Next articleSuns rally to beat Bucks 125-124 despite Giannis’ 47 points Digital AIM Web Support By Digital AIM Web Support – February 11, 2021 Twitter Pinterestcenter_img Facebook By ELAINE KURTENBACHAP Business WriterShares fell in Tokyo and Sydney on Friday after stocks closed nearly flat on Wall Street, though the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq composite still logged record highs. Most Asian markets were closed to mark the Lunar New Year. Investors remain cautiously optimistic about prospects for a new round of government aid as the economic recovery seemingly stalls. The latest U.S. government report on jobless claims reaffirmed that employment remains a weak spot in the economy, even as vaccine distribution ramps up in the hopes of eventually ending the pandemic. Japan’s Nikkei 225 index lost 0.3% to 29,460.56 and the A&P/ASX 200 declined 0.5% to 6,814.90. Weak economic data are serving to “fog up the glass,” Stephen Innes of Axi said in a commentary. “Global markets continue to trade mixed echoing that somber data view as participation remains muted, suggesting that investors need a bit more cajoling by more all clear economic smoke signal on the horizon before getting back in the saddle,” Innes said. Although another day of choppy trading on Wall Street left the major U.S. stock indexes nearly flat Thursday, the S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite still hit all-time highs. The S&P 500 rose 0.2% to 3,916.38. Technology stocks led the gainers after two relatively weak days, almost single-handedly outweighing losses by energy stocks, banks and companies that rely on consumer spending. The yield on 10-year Treasury notes rose to 1.16% from 1.15% late Wednesday after touching 1.20% earlier this week. Wall Street is still digesting solid corporate earnings and signs of a decline in new virus cases. The Dow Jones Industrial Average slipped less than 0.1% to 31,430.70 a day after setting a record high. The tech-heavy Nasdaq gained 0.4%, to 14,025.77. Its previous all-time high was Tuesday. Small company stocks notched gains. The Russell 2000 index added 0.1% to 2,285.32. The index is up 15.7% so far this year, while the S&P 500 is up 4.3%. Democrats in Congress are working on a potential $1.9 trillion relief package that would include direct payments to people and more jobless aid as unemployment remains stubbornly high. The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits fell slightly last week to 793,000. The job market improved somewhat last summer but has slowed since the fall. Nearly 10 million jobs have been lost to the pandemic. Companies continued reporting mostly solid earnings Thursday, adding to a surprisingly good earnings season. Kraft Heinz climbed 4.9% and Zillow Group jumped 17.8% after beating Wall Street’s fourth-quarter profit forecasts. The pandemic and business shutdowns are still hurting many companies and crimping their financial results. Molson Coors fell 9.1% for the biggest decline in the S&P 500 after its profits fell short of expectations because business shutdowns in Europe hurt sales. Shares of online dating service operator Bumble soared 63.5% on their first day of trading. And cannabis stocks fell broadly a day after surging amid a buying spree fueled partly by members of the same online forum that hyped GameStop and other beaten-down companies in recent weeks. Aphria and Tilray, Canadian cannabis companies that agreed to combine in December, fell 35.8% and 49.7%, respectively. So far this year, Aphria has more than doubled, while Tilray has nearly quadrupled in value. Sundial Growers fared better, recovering from an early slide to gain 3.1%. It’s price has increased more than six-fold this year. Shares of Mastercard rose 2.6% after the payment processing company said it would start integrating cyber currencies into its payment network, allowing people to potentially transfer currencies like Bitcoin from customer to merchant. Bitcoin also rose on the announcement, gaining more than 4%, according to the online currency brokerage Coinbase. In other trading, U.S. benchmark crude lost 47 cents to $57.77 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It gave up 44 cents overnight to $58.24. Brent crude, the international standard, shed 43 cents to $60.71 per barrel. The U.S. dollar rose to 104.82 Japanese yen from 104.75 yen. The euro slipped to $1.2120 from $1.2131. ——— AP Business writers Damian J. Troise and Alex Veiga contributed.Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.A man wearing a face mask walks past a bank’s electronic board showing the Hong Kong share index in Hong Kong, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2021. Despite a short drop in early trading in Hong Kong, most major Asian stock indexes were higher on Thursday after President Joe Biden held his first conversation with Chinese leader Xi Jinping since taking office.Kin Cheung Twitter Stock indexes wobble as investor caution offsets optimism WhatsApp WhatsApplast_img read more

Jun
2

Code Corporation Enables Epic Rover Mobile Barcode Reading Capabilities for Mass COVID-19 Vaccination Rollout

first_img WhatsApp SALT LAKE CITY–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb 16, 2021– Code Corporation, a global leader in barcode scanning and data capture technologies, has collaborated with Epic, developer of the leading electronic health record system (EHR), to offer mobile scanning capabilities through Code’s CortexDecoder software. To support health systems mass COVID-19 vaccination effort, Code is offering a free six-month demo license to users of the Rover mobile app, which will help them get up and running as quickly as possible. This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210216005905/en/ Code offers a 6-month free demo license of CortexDecoder for Epic Rover customers that enables healthcare facilities to speed vaccination efforts (Graphic: Business Wire) “By scanning and reading barcodes, Code serves as the bridge between the patients seeking vaccinations and their vaccination appointments in the EMR powering the mass COVID-19 vaccination rollout,” Kent Hansen, CEO of Code Corporation said. “Code’s CortexDecoder can be accessed in Rover, enabling healthcare professionals to quickly find and open a patient chart to help move the patient through the vaccination process. With CortexDecoder healthcare, workers can quickly and accurately read any applicable barcodes right from their mobile device to speed the process of mass immunization.” CortexDecoder is an enterprise-grade barcode decoder technology that allows users to decode any barcode symbology. It can read barcodes of virtually any print quality, at any angle, on any surface—including curved or reflective surfaces, and can even handle damaged barcodes. CortexDecoder within Rover is a module used to decode barcodes. It is a fast and reliable decoder available to Rover customers. CortexDecoder does not store or transfer any data to any outside source for any reason. When barcodes are scanned, it simply decodes the barcode and immediately sends the decoded data into Rover for use, making it the most secure option available. This level of security and accuracy empowers organizations with streamlined efficiency where it is needed most. Coupling security, accuracy and efficiency with hand-held mobility enables the seamless coordination of mass immunization efforts in traditional and non-traditional care settings, such as hospitals or drive-through vaccination centers. Customers of Epic may access the six-month demo license to CortexDecoder through this site: https://www.codecorp.com/covidvax. About Code Corporation For more than 20 years, Code Corporation has been an industry pioneer, leader, and champion for data capture innovation and has garnered more than 100 patents. By crafting and continuing to perfect its unique decoding algorithms, Code and its line of image-based scanning and decoding technology consistently deliver unparalleled performance companies around the world depend on every day. Code designs and manufactures a complete line of market-leading hardware and software data capture solutions. Code products are not only valued for providing a consistent level of workflow efficiency year after year, but also for their ergonomic design, durability, ease of customization, and seamless integration. For more, please visit www.codecorp.com. View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210216005905/en/ CONTACT: Company Contact: Sal Giani, Marketing Manager 801-495-2200 [email protected] Contact: Tim Rush Springboard5 801-208-1100 [email protected] KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA UTAH INDUSTRY KEYWORD: SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY HARDWARE DATA MANAGEMENT SOURCE: Code Corporation Copyright Business Wire 2021. PUB: 02/16/2021 11:01 AM/DISC: 02/16/2021 11:01 AM http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210216005905/en By Digital AIM Web Support – February 16, 2021 Twitter Facebook Facebook Pinterest Pinterestcenter_img Code Corporation Enables Epic Rover Mobile Barcode Reading Capabilities for Mass COVID-19 Vaccination Rollout Local NewsBusiness Twitter TAGS  Previous articleWinning numbers drawn in ‘Two Step’ gameNext articleBringCom Completes Pan-African Fiber Ring Network Digital AIM Web Support WhatsApplast_img read more

May
26

Labour Reforms and the Elusive Quest for Workers’ Rights

first_imgColumnsLabour Reforms and the Elusive Quest for Workers’ Rights Badrinath Rao20 Oct 2020 1:20 AMShare This – xAs the second largest labour force in the world, with a youthful demographic profile to boot, India is blessed with an abundance of human resource it can leverage to its advantage. Yet, one of its most enduring, if somewhat pitiless, paradoxes is that it has a deplorable history of underutilizing and ill-treating its workforce. To date, all attempts to set right this anomaly have met…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginAs the second largest labour force in the world, with a youthful demographic profile to boot, India is blessed with an abundance of human resource it can leverage to its advantage. Yet, one of its most enduring, if somewhat pitiless, paradoxes is that it has a deplorable history of underutilizing and ill-treating its workforce. To date, all attempts to set right this anomaly have met with limited success. In what might seem as a rational, pro-working class initiative, the Parliament passed three labour code bills in September 2020. These bills – the Industrial Relations Bill, the Code on Social Security Bill, and the Occupational Safety, Health, and Working Conditions Bill along with the Code on Wages Bill passed in 2019 – supposedly aim to provide comprehensive legal protection to workers while affording employers the flexibility they need to conduct business in an atmosphere marked by uncertainty and volatility. Based on a consolidation of 29 disparate, often confusing labour statutes, these bills, some argue, will promote transparency, ease of compliance, fair working conditions, and better employer-employee relations. For a long time now, proponents of economic reforms and globalization have argued that labour laws constitute a big, almost insuperable obstacle to growth. They complained about the rigidity of labour laws, their contradictory stipulations, and the onerous strain they cast on employers. The vehemence of this assertion, in some rarefied circles, placed labour law reforms on par with more pressing concerns such as attracting foreign investment, gaining access to advanced technologies, and wooing multinational corporations. Even if one concedes that demands such as these are well-intentioned, one cannot but wonder if ‘reforming’ labour laws, particularly in the way it has been done, is a step in the right direction. Some might, albeit mistakenly, argue it is. This is predicated on the logic that simplified laws promote voluntary conformity, which will ultimately redound to the benefit of workers. This position rests on two fallacies. First, its proponents ardently believe the new bills robustly promote labour rights. Second, their understanding of labour issues is colored by concerns about efficiency, optimization, and profits, to the exclusion of everything else. Right from the time the central government announced its intention to reform labour laws, well-meaning labour experts, trade unionists, academics, and policymakers have proposed concrete strategies for ameliorating the conditions of the working class while accommodating business interests. They weighed in on the draft bills when they were being discussed by the Parliamentary Standing Committee. Yet, the final iteration of the labour code bills is riddled with lacunae, which defeats their entire purpose. Labour experts and policy wonks have extensively analyzed their aberrations. FLAWS IN THE LABOUR CODE BILLS Broadly, the four labour bills offer symbolic sops to workers and substantial powers to employers. One has to be willfully obtuse to miss the flagrant imprint of the neoliberal agenda writ all over the bills. Scholarly critiques of the bills have highlighted several crucial inadequacies which frustrate their primary purpose. For instance, the Industrial Relations Code Bill (IRC) empowers employers to unilaterally close establishments and retrench workers with no obligation to pay compensation. It grants governments at all levels a great deal of latitude in applying the new laws. Under the IRC, the government can exempt any establishment or class of establishments from the law ‘in public interest.’ Till recently, businesses with over 300 employees could not lay them off without securing the government’s approval. This limit has now been reduced to 100 employees. Distressingly, the labour code bill has also placed significant restrictions on the rights of workers to strike. One of the most worrisome aspects of the IRC bill is that it provides for fixed-term employment contracts which will enable employers to hire and fire workers arbitrarily. The Occupational Safety, Health, and Working Conditions Code Bill, belying its commitment to workplace safety, empowers the government to exempt businesses from the law for a specified period ‘in the interest of promoting economic activity.’ To compound matters, the Social Security Bill does not offer universal social security benefits to workers. It has also curtailed the powers of the bureaucracy to determine the amount of provident fund and Employee State Insurance dues owed by businesses. The new labour code bills overwhelmingly favor businesses. These much-hyped labour reforms will make no difference to the lakhs of guest lecturers in colleges earning pathetic wages for their intellectual labour. They do not provide social security to Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) and Anganwadi workers. Nor will they end the daily humiliation and sexual harassment of workers in the lower echelons of the workforce. FACTORS AFFECTING WORKERS’ RIGHTS To comprehend the limitations of labour reforms, one has to recognize three intractable dimensions of the problem. First, of the 520 million workers in the labour force, 94% are in the unorganized sector. Barely ten percent are unionized. Workers, therefore, have woefully limited bargaining power. Second, no matter how stringent, laws are barely implemented. Their efficacy has to be evaluated in the larger context of the crippling infirmities of the justice system. We have rule by law in India, not rule of law. Also, as Roscoe Pound, former Dean of the Harvard Law School, pointed out long ago, there is a huge discrepancy between law in books and law in action. No matter how robust, mere legislation cannot make much difference to the everyday lives of workers. Third, except for a handful of progressive judges, almost the entire judiciary has a perfunctory attitude toward the working class. Recall that even judges of the Supreme Court have disparaged workers in their obiter dicta. Together these factors pose almost insurmountable barriers to vindicating workers’ rights in India. A systematic analysis of labour reforms must address a host of questions: what are the real challenges facing the labouring class? Why do labour laws almost never make a difference in the lives of workers? If we are genuinely interested in labour reforms, where should we begin? The first thing to note is that the labour code bills show little appreciation of massive transformations taking place in the world of work and occupations. We are on the cusp of what Klaus Schwab, founder of the World Economic Forum, describes as the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Other scholars see the current transition as the next stage of the Great Transformation Karl Polanyi enunciated in 1944. Julie Cohen, Professor of Law at Georgetown University in the US, has identified three major changes which will have far-reaching impact on labour. They are ‘the propertization of intangible resources, dematerialization, and datafication.’ While the denouement of these cataclysmic shifts is hard to predict, in the immediate context they have led to precarity, marginality, disempowerment, insecurity, alienation, and obsolescence. Rising inequality, new labour-saving technologies, the digital divide, and ease with which capital can seamlessly source labour from different places have all made the working class defenceless. The less obvious, yet more deleterious, threats are the erosion of dignity and recognition, human security, and virtually no opportunities to thrive as workers. This is apparent from the plight of gig and platform workers who, according to the British labour economist, Prof. Guy Standing, are part of the ‘concierge economy.’ Though labeled micro-entrepreneurs and independent contractors, they are perpetually consigned to a limbo. They are not employees and hence not entitled to any benefits of a regular job and, save their labour and, sometimes, their vehicles, they have no capital worth the name to qualify as entrepreneurs. Gig workers are ubiquitous in big cities. They deliver pizzas and parcels. They carry out tasks we loath to do ourselves. With no fixed income, regular working hours, a workplace, and fellow workers to relate to, platform workers are disembodied entities who assume a corporeal form only to do the jobs they are lucky to get. Because it is so cheap and efficient, we love the gig economy. Gig workers, however, do not even register on our minds. THE INEFFICACY OF LABOUR LAWS Labour laws seldom work because they do not accord primacy to two points. First, through our laws, policies, and everyday acts, we deny the personhood of those who work for us. Lowly workers are not human beings. Thus, farmers, teachers, construction workers, factory workers and so on are a nuisance whose existence we reluctantly acknowledge when they agitate and block arterial streets. Lately, even the courts want to render them invisible by imposing restrictions on how and where they can protest. Excluding such extreme circumstances, the working class does not exist for us. We live in a self-induced stupor to insulate ourselves from the messy challenges of the working class. A mindset that refuses to acknowledge the very humanity of workers can never offer lasting solutions to their problems. Consider how menial servants are generally depicted in films, TV soaps, and popular culture. Almost always, they are portrayed as obsequious and dumb factotums with no sense of agency. Because we do not see labourers as purposeful human agents, we have no respect for them. Hence we pass shoddy, tokenistic laws and call them ‘reforms.’ Second, labour laws are ineffective because they are premised on the notion that labour is a commodity. The International Labour Organization has categorically repudiated this idea. If we view labour as just something that can be bought and sold, we make a foundational error. Throughout the world, we see, in varying degrees, a mismatch between the potential of workers and the demands of their job. When work is reduced to a mere source of livelihood, workers are estranged and miserable in their occupations. WORK AS A MARKER OF IDENTITY Work is central to our identity. It defines our personhood; it gives us a sense of who we are. More than a source of livelihood, labour defines our place in the world. Moreover, work that is in tandem with one’s innate human potential and results in its efflorescence confers ontological security. It ceases to be a chore. Instead, work becomes an endless source of joy. The labour we do also determines our community. It is a source of our values and worldview. Creating a scientific, well-organized workforce where every individual is afforded the opportunity to go as far as their talents will allow is a compelling algorithm of a cohesive, affirming society. Any meaningful attempt to reform labour laws has to begin by overhauling the philosophical premises of this enterprise. This involves recognizing that values such as human security, dignity, recognition, human capabilities, and human flourishing are inviolable. The threshold question to ask, therefore, is do the contemplated reforms further reinforce these bedrock values. All laws and reforms must be refracted through the prism of these values and must fully comport with them. HUMAN SECURITY AND DIGNITY A stable, well-defined occupation with good career prospects and work we relish are the most edifying sources of security. The United Nations Development Program defines human security as ‘freedom from want’ and ‘freedom from fear.’ A reform initiative that facilitates a hire-and-fire policy in the name of labour flexibility without providing dependable alternatives is conceptually flawed. Likewise, the notion of dignity serves as a guidepost for ameliorative measures. A rich philosophical tradition, starting with Roman statesman Cicero (44 BCE) has developed the idea of dignity from a signifier of aristocratic rank to the most distinctive feature of human beings. Cicero argued that humans have dignity because of their capacity for rational thought. Giovanni Mirandola, a 15th century Italian philosopher, also underscored human dignity, ascribing it to the human power of self-transformation. He maintained that the capacity of humans to be whatever they wish to be entitles them to an innate sense of dignity which cannot be transgressed. Immanuel Kant, the 18th century German philosopher, explicated the significance of dignity by relating it to our status as normative beings. One of the universal laws in his formulation of the Categorical Imperative requires us to treat people as ends in themselves, not as means to an end. Kant’s view is that, as moral agents, we can make and obligate ourselves to universal laws which cannot be contravened. This capacity to harness the transformative power of reason and morality, regardless of what we do with it, entitles us to dignity. The labour code bill desecrates human dignity by treating workers as cannon fodder. Its provisions such as the government’s discretionary powers to suspend labour laws on flimsy grounds, withholding social security benefits, and restricting strikes and lockouts are repugnant to the inalienable rights of workers. These aberrations emanate from an ideational negligence of the sacredness of human dignity and its multifarious manifestations. They also explain why the labour code bill cannot address one of the core challenges of the working class, namely, insulating their dignity from the relentless incursions of market forces. HUMAN FLOURISHING A related, if poorly understood, point concerns the umbilical relationship between dignity and human flourishing. The Aristotelean notion of eudemonia, the striving to become one’s best self, is the quintessence of human flourishing. Aristotle emphasized the imperative of creating a social arrangement that enables people to access their higher selves. Thus, human flourishing, both regarding one’s own life and in reference to the lives of others, ought to be the polestar of all our endeavors. This project demands respect for human agency and dignity. Where dignity is eroded, human beings do not flourish. Further, human agency is fortified when we create an ecosystem that identifies and nourishes talent. The optimum utilization of one’s talent is the most enduring wellspring of happiness. Besides devaluing dignity, the labour code bills are silent about equipping workers and training them for moving up the value chain. They are oblivious to the fact that being stuck in a low-paying job with virtually no prospects for professional growth is a recipe for labour unrest. What is noteworthy is that on the one hand, the labour code bills create the conditions for discontent among workers and, on the other, imposes debilitating restrictions on agitations. HUMAN CAPABILITIES AND RECOGNITION The drafters of the labour code bills could have avoided this grotesque contradiction by incorporating Nobel laureate Dr. Amartya Sen’s ideas on human capabilities. His theory marks the culmination of a dense and variegated philosophical debate on equality and human development. Approaching development primarily as an avenue for expanding human freedoms, Dr. Sen argued that fostering human capabilities is a sine qua non for promoting genuine equality. Going beyond philosophers like John Rawls, Richard Dworkin, and Thomas Nagel, who focused on the equitable distribution of resources, Dr. Sen advanced the basic needs and capabilities approach to equality. He maintained that freedom is not just the achievement of things a person values or has reason to value, but also the capability to achieve these things. This broad notion of freedom burgeoning from the development of one’s human capabilities is what laws must aim for. Viewed from this perspective, the labour code bills are conceptually brittle. They privilege the rights of employers over those of employees. Their unstated premise is that what workers claim as rights are largesse offered by the state and employers. The major thrust of the bills is to contain and manage the aspirations of workers, not to create a regime that fosters enabling capabilities. This is one of the chief reasons nothing in the bills even remotely empowers workers and enhances their bargaining power. One might argue that the mandate of the Labour Code bills is to reform labour laws, not to promote equality and human capabilities. This dichotomy is untenable. Labour relations do not operate in a vacuum. Workers’ rights are imbricated with social attitudes toward the labouring class. One things feeds off the other. Thus, since labour rights are anemic and effete, workers are relegated to the periphery. Consequently, they suffer from the blight of social disdain. Because the labouring class is the object of contempt, its needs are not accorded priority. Over time, this vicious cycle acquires a life of its own. The upshot is that workers suffer from a double whammy: unequal bargaining power and misrecognition with no end in sight. Philosophers like Charles Taylor and Nancy Fraser have written extensively on the importance of recognition in our lives. They state that we become fully human through a dialogical process when others recognize us for who we are. Mis-recognizing or withholding recognition is oppression. The politics of recognition currently on the ascendant across the globe seeks to reverse this trend. The labour code bills could have aided this process by being fair to the working class. Instead, they can barely conceal their pro-capital tilt. REINSTATING WORKERS’ RIGHTS All the abnormalities of the labour code bills emerge from and are sustained by two sources: first, our philosophical misconceptions about labour and its role in promoting the common weal; and second, a common sense that denigrates most forms of labour. Redressing this situation demands dismantling the artificial mental roadblocks we have set up. We can undertake this task at several levels. As a first step, we must junk school and college textbooks that purvey apocryphal stories about how some politicians grappled with alligators in their childhood. Likewise, hagiographies of film stars and cricketers must be excised. Instead, our children must be taught to appreciate the value of labour, the importance of dignity, and what we owe to each other as human beings. Second, judges, bureaucrats, the police, legislators, and educators must be required to undergo compulsory sensitivity training about the toiling class and their everyday struggles. Third, the demeaning depiction of labourers in popular culture must end. Contrary to popular perception, denigrating the working class – not some salacious scenes in the movies – is the most objectionable form of vulgarity. None of these initiatives will succeed if we do not first bury the labour code bills fathoms deep. Barring business owners, no one will notice their demise. The views expressed in this essay are personal (Badrinath Rao is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Asian Studies at Kettering University in Flint, Michigan, in the US. He is also a practicing attorney in the United States)[Watch Live Law Documentary On Labor Chowks] Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more