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Archive of posts published in the category: pksqecjz
May
12

Follow the leaders

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Follow the leadersOn 11 Jun 2002 in Personnel Today Takingleadership culture to all levels of an organisation not only requires arecognition of the difference between the roles of manager and leader, but afirm commitment to a company-wide programme of change. By Keith RodgersIfyou’re looking for evidence of the huge gulf between operational managementskills and the leadership qualities required to drive a company forwardlong-term, Kate Lidbetter has some powerful anecdotes. A founding director ofleadership consultancy SKAI Associates, she is frequently brought intoblue-chip organisations to help train newly appointed directors. “They areaware that they are now a leader,” she says, “but they have no ideawhat they should be doing. So they tend to revert to type, which is managing.It is like having a completely new job when you land in a leadership chair.”Theconcept of leadership is popularly personified by high-profile, charismaticfigures in the mould of Jack Welch or Richard Branson. The reality, however, isboth more mundane and far-reaching. Leadership qualities are not the exclusivedomain of those at the top of an organisation or division – they need tocascade down through an organisation, as far as frontline departmental heads onthe shopfloor. And contrary to popular myth about leaders being born not made;many of these qualities can be developed when managers are sufficientlydetermined to grow into new roles. Thedifficulty organisations face is that this development programme istime-consuming: it requires a thorough understanding of where management stopsand leadership starts, and leads to major cultural shifts within the company. Whilethe disciplines of managing and leading are synonymous in popular culture, muchof the focus in business consultancy and academia is on mapping out thedistinctions between the two. One of the clearest explanations of whatleadership entails was published in Harvard Business Review in 1990. In WhatLeaders Really Do, John P Kotter argues that leadership and management are”two distinctive and complementary systems of action”. Management,which evolved primarily in response to the emergence of large organisations inthe 20th century, is about coping with complexity; leadership is about copingwith change.Kotterpoints to three core tasks where the two disciplines require different actionsand responses – deciding what needs to be done; creating networks of people andrelationships to accomplish an agenda; and ensuring those people do the job. Inthe first instance, managers use planning and budgeting techniques to handlecomplexity; leaders, by contrast, set a direction, mapping out a vision anddeveloping strategies to achieve them. In terms of people and relationships,managers create organisational structures and fill the relevant roles, makingjudgements that “are much like architectural decisions”. Leaders,however, focus on aligning people, which is “more of a communicationschallenge than a design problem”. Aligning involves talking to moreindividuals – anyone who can either implement or block the vision – gettingpeople to accept the message and empowering them to act on it. Finally,managers ensure the agenda is accomplished by controlling and problem solving,while leaders achieve their vision by motivating and inspiring.JohnPotter, a leadership expert appointed visiting professor to the Centre forLeadership Studies at the University of Exeter in 1998, reinforces thisargument, suggesting that: “Leadership is primarily an emotionally-basedprocess, whereas management is to do with a control process, and is largelyintellectually based in its nature”. He identifies four qualities thatmark out leaders. They have to be believable and credible; they need to be ableto take on board a variety of viewpoints dispassionately; and, unlike managers,they require strong communication and interpersonal skills, and a high degreeof emotional intelligence.Onedanger in drawing distinctions between management and leadership is that thelatter comes to be seen as a higher-value quality, while management appearsmundane and tedious. But the reality is that both are crucial. As Lidbettersays: “If you think of an organisation focusing too much on management –on processes, standards, execution, and so on – in my experience you have anorganisation that is not sustainable in the long run. It is constrained, andnobody is inspired about the future. If you think of an organisation that hasleadership – someone inspiring, setting the direction, defining strategy – butno management capability, then you have no possibility of follow-through. It isall talk, no action. You can’t have one without the other.”Formost established companies, management skills are not the main issue: seniorand middle-ranking executives are usually seasoned professionals boasting extensiveoperational skills. Developing leadership qualities, however, is a differentmatter. While knowledge of processes and execution can be taught, vision andthe other ’emotional’ qualities required of leaders need to be developed, oftenthrough practical experience. Expertssuggest the best way to translate theory into practice is to take a pragmaticapproach, focusing on areas where individuals can quickly see for themselveshow leadership brings about different results from management. GavinWallbridge, principal consultant at Penna Change Consulting, argues that thedevelopment process can initially be spurred by playing on an individual’sbasic instincts – for many, the idea of being termed a ‘leader’ is in itselfappealing. It also helps show senior managers that those beneath them arelooking to them for leadership – they may not have been delivering it, but theexpectation is there. By assessing how leadership skills would be applied ineveryday scenarios, managers can begin to meet those expectations. Amanager undertaking an employee review, for example, should see it as acritical exercise and work out how a leader would approach it – as anopportunity to inspire people with a sense of passion and energy. “You canget people to act differently by asking what a leader would do, even if thesituation is fairly mundane,” Wallbridge says. “You can get mostmanagers to realise that leaders act in certain ways at certain times.”Inhis Harvard Business Review article, Kotter reinforces the fact that many ofthe attributes associated with leadership are surprisingly straightforward.”Most discussions of vision have a tendency to degenerate into themystical. But developing good business direction isn’t magic – it is a tough,sometimes exhausting process of gathering and analysing information. Nor dovisions and strategies have to be brilliantly innovative: effective businessvisions regularly have an almost mundane quality, usually consisting of ideasthat are already well known.”Demystifyingattributes in this way becomes more critical as leadership culture is filtereddown from senior execs to others in an organisation. While the Bransons andWelchs of the world take credit for driving entire businesses forward, much ofthe need for leadership is in frontline positions, where departmental managersare required to motivate and inspire their teams on a day-to-day basis. AsPotter points out, this kind of leadership is just as big a challenge as thatrequired in the higher echelons of a company. “We are asking people in thefrontline to act more like leaders than they ever have done,” he says.Extendingleadership culture can, however, lead to problems. Tony Dunk, head ofperformance programmes at HR specialist CDA Group, points out that afterimplementing change at the top of the organisation, many companies focus theirnext development effort on frontline staff. That can leave middle managementuntrained and out in the cold. CDAworked with a UK leisure chain which undertook a major change managementprogramme, switching from a dictatorial approach where rules and guidelines forlocal managers were centrally enforced, to a culture where individuals werebetter empowered to interpret customer need in their own way. Over a three-yearprogramme, the highest number of casualties came from middle management.”Usually they were part of the new structure, but [some] disappeared whenthey couldn’t manage the change. For example, if they’d go into an [outlet] andsee something they didn’t like, a manager would say: ‘You shouldn’t be doingthat.’ A leader would say: ‘Why are you doing that, what advantage does it giveus, and would it benefit other people?’ In other words, they did not focus oncompliance. There are some real differences between management and leadership –it causes a lot of stress and a lot of casualties.”Handlingthis change management process should create a perfect opportunity for HR, butexperts’ experiences of how well the function rises to the challenge differsconsiderably. “We often see ourselves hitting up against HRorganisations,” says Dunk. “Mostly HR is policing, not leading. Mostof our good experiences are where there is good alignment between HR and theline, and the benefits are obvious to both.” Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. last_img read more

May
12

News in brief

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article News in briefOn 3 Sep 2002 in Personnel Today This week’s news in briefPotters Bar helpline Rail workers are being encouraged to call a confidential hotline set up by policeinvestigating the fatal crash at Potters Bar. The police are concerned thatmany employees were afraid to tell the whole truth during official interviewsbecause of the presence of company lawyers. www.btp.police.ukPrisoners’ job search Prisoners will soon be able to apply for work through an in-jail computernetwork, providing up-to-the minute information on vacancies throughout Europe.The aim of the scheme is to help prisoners prepare for a fresh start byarranging job interviews to coincide with their release. The machines willinitially be installed in four prisons – Lewes, Swansea, Featherstone andHollesley Bay.  www.homeoffice.gov.ukFire service pay offer The UK’s fire brigades have offered staff a 4 per cent pay rise to stop anational walkout. The Employers’ Organisation for Local Government has alsooffered an independent pay review to avert threatened pay strike action nextmonth. Charles Nolda of the Employers’ Organisation said a joint approach foran inde-pendent review was the way forward. www.lg-employers.gov.ukCost of working shock Staff spend up to a fifth of their salaries on job-related costs, accordingto a new report. An average employee spends £3,214 a year on travel to and fromthe office, clothes, haircuts and appearance, according to a survey byreed.co.uk. With the average salary in the UK being £23,000 a year, the figureequates to 20 per cent of take home pay. www.reed.co.ukCommitment shy UK Levels of staff commitment in the UK are significantly lower than in otherglobal economies, according to new research. International Survey Research interviewedmore than 360,000 employees from the world’s 10 biggest economies and found thecountry with the highest employee commitment is Brazil. The UK came thirdbottom with only 59 per cent of staff ranking their firm favourably.  www.isrsurveys.co.uklast_img read more

May
9

Ionospheric plasma convection in the southern hemisphere

first_imgThe first ionospheric plasma convection maps ordered by the y- and z-components of the IMF using only data from the southern hemisphere are presented. These patterns are determined from line-of-sight velocity measurements of the Polar Anglo-American Conjugate Experiment (PACE) located at Halley, Antarctica, with the majority of the observations coming from 65°–75° magnetic latitude. For IMF Bz positive and negative conditions, the observed plasma motions are consistent with a standard two cell pattern. For the periods from dusk through midnight to dawn, flow speeds are at least twice as large for Bz negative component compared with Bz positive. The observations about noon are significantly different from each other. For Bz positive, little ordered plasma motion is observed. For Bz negative, there are large anti-sunward flows the orientation of which is ordered by IMF By. These By orientated flows are consistent with theoretical predictions, and are anti-symmetric to those reported from the northern hemisphere. The two most significant differences from previous observations are that the convection reversal in the late morning sector for By negative conditions occurs at about a 4° lower latitude than the Heppner and Maynard (1987) model. This may be due to a seasonal bias in the PACE dataset. Also, the separatrix between eastward and westward flow near midnight has a very different shape dependent upon the orientation of IMF By. For positive By conditions, the separatrix is observed at progressively lower latitudes at later local times, but for By negative conditions, the separatrix appears at increasingly higher latitudes at later times.last_img read more

May
8

Utah State Football To Honor Three Championship Teams At Homecoming Saturday

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOGAN, Utah-Saturday, as part of their Homecoming festivities, Utah State football will honor three previous championship teams, the Aggies’ squads from 1978, 1993 and 2013.The 1978 team, coached by Bruce Snyder, tied for first in the Pacific Coast Athletic Association (the predecessor to the Big West) with a record of 7-4 and was the Aggies’ first conference championship team since 1961.This team featured former Detroit Lions signal-caller Eric Hipple and former Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks tailback Rick Parros.The 1993 team was coached by Charlie Weatherbie and tied for first in the Big West. This squad was led by legendary Canadian Football League quarterback Anthony Calvillo, primarily known for his days with the Montreal Alouettes. He also played with the CFL’s Las Vegas Posse and Hamilton Tiger-Cats.Calvillo, who retired in 2013, is currently the all-time North American pro football leader in passing yards at 79,816 yards. That is 7,713 yards ahead of NFL all-time leading passer Drew Brees of the New Orleans Saints.Current USU head football coach Matt Wells played on the 1993 team and his 2013 team, the first he coached at Logan, is known for winning the Mountain West Conference’s Mountain Division.After losing to Fresno State in the league championship game, the 2013 Aggies went on to beat #24 Illinois in the SDCCU Poinsettia Bowl at San Diego. Brad James October 9, 2018 /Sports News – Local Utah State Football To Honor Three Championship Teams At Homecoming Saturday Tags: 1978/1993/2013/Anthony Calvillo/Bruce Snyder/Championship Teams/Charlie Weatherbie/Eric Hipple/Fresno State/Hamilton Tiger-Cats/Homecoming/Illinois/Las Vegas Posse/Montreal Alouettes/New Orleans Saints/Rick Parros/USU Football Written bylast_img read more

May
4

Norway: Navy Assists Kongsberg With AUV Pipeline Survey

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Norway: Navy Assists Kongsberg With AUV Pipeline Survey View post tag: News by topic View post tag: with View post tag: Norway Norway: Navy Assists Kongsberg With AUV Pipeline Survey View post tag: Assists View post tag: survey View post tag: AUV View post tag: Navalcenter_img View post tag: Navy March 4, 2011 Kongsberg has completed the world’s longest multi-sensor AUV pipeline survey using one of its cutting-edge HUGIN 1000 Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV). The pipeline inspection took place February 9th – 11th 2011, in the Hjelte fjord near Bergen, Norway and the HUGIN 1000 was operated from the Royal Norwegian Navy vessel HNoMS Maloy.The subject of the inspection was two subsea pipelines going to the Mongstad oil refinery. The HUGIN 1000 AUV was equipped with a an advanced suite of KONGSBERG imaging equipment including the HISAS 1030 synthetic aperture sonar, EM3002 multibeam echo sounder and an optical camera with LED lighting. The instruments were used to inspect around 30 km of subsea pipeline in an 8-hour, two-pass mission.In the first pass, side-scan data from the HISAS 1030 sonar was used to detect and track the pipelines in real-time, using PipeTracker software for pipeline detection and tracking extracted pipe-like features in the sonar images, with a high degree of robustness towards false detections.The PipeTracker software, which was developed in a collaborative effort with the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) in a project funded by the Norwegian Research Council, runs as a plug-in module in the standard HUGIN payload system. The HUGIN 1000 control system in turn uses the identified pipeline tracks to position the vehicle at an optimal range for HISAS imaging. The whole process is fully automated inside the AUV and requires no operator intervention.In the second pass, HUGIN followed the pipeline tracks identified in the first pass at low altitude and inspected the pipelines using the EM 3002 multibeam and the optical camera. After the mission, the recorded HISAS 1030 data was post-processed into high-resolution (4×4 cm) sonar images and bathymetry maps of the pipeline. Together with the optical images and the multi-beam data recorded in the second pass, this gave a detailed view of the pipeline surroundings and the pipeline itself. The complete procedure was repeated the next day over the second pipeline in a new 8-hour, two-pass mission.Both pipelines were surveyed at a constant speed of 4 knots and at 4-25m altitude, depending on the sensor in use. Water depth was 180-560m. The greater speed of the HUGIN 1000 compared to that of a ROV meant that 60km of pipeline could be inspected in a little over 16 hours during the two passes. Furthermore, the stability of the HUGIN platform and the ability to simultaneously operate both at high speed and at low altitude resulted in an efficient survey with crystal clear images from the onboard optical camera.Kongsberg Maritime and subsidiary Hydroid offer ‘Full Picture’ HUGIN and REMUS AUV solutions, where the vehicles themselves and required instruments can be supplied by Kongsberg Maritime, ensuring users have a single company to co-operate with for any kind of survey. The company is aligning the two product lines, providing users operational synergies and a strengthened technology base, suitable for all underwater survey applications. The PipeTracker software module has been developed in a collaborative effort with the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) in project funded by the Norwegian Research Council (the FORNY-program).[mappress]Source: kongsberg,March 4, 2011; View post tag: Pipeline View post tag: Kongsberg Equipment & technology Share this articlelast_img read more

May
4

VRC 30 Holds Change of Command

first_img View post tag: VRC 30 April 21, 2015 Authorities View post tag: Command View post tag: americas VRC 30 Holds Change of Command Back to overview,Home naval-today VRC 30 Holds Change of Command View post tag: News by topic View post tag: change The “Providers” of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 held a change of command ceremony March 26 at Naval Air Station (NAS) North Island in San Diego.During the ceremony, Cmdr. Samuel C. Bryant relieved Cmdr. Chadwick J. White as the 43rd commanding officer of VRC-30.White, a native of Swainsboro, Georgia, graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1996. He served his first fleet tour in VRC-40 in Norfolk, Virginia, and then he became an instructor pilot at Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 120. White also served as the flag secretary for Carrier Strike Group 3, was a department head at VRC-30, and the officer in charge of VRC-30 Detachment 5 in Atsugi, Japan. Before reporting to VRC-30 as the executive officer, White was the action officer with the Joint Chiefs of Staff, J-6 Directorate in Washington, D.C.Bryant, a native of Ithaca, New York, is a 1997 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. He served his first fleet tour at VRC-40 in Norfolk, and afterwards went to Training Squadron 22 in Kingsville, Texas, as an advanced jet instructor pilot. Additionally, he served as the assistant officer in charge of VRC-30 Detachment 5 in Atsugi, Japan; as a department head at VRC-40; joint tour at a U.S. Northern Command, Joint Task Force; and executive officer of VAW-120 in Norfolk. In January 2014, Bryant became the executive officer of VRC-30.VRC-30 enables combatant commanders to conduct and sustain expeditionary carrier strike group operations by providing rapid, long-range, high priority air logistics, through self-sustaining detachments operating from fixed logistics sites, aircraft carriers, and remote, out-of-theater land bases. Recently VRC-30 celebrated the 50th anniversary of the C-2A Greyhound’s first flight in November of 1964. VRC-30 has an outstanding safety record with more than 207,000 mishap free flight hours.[mappress mapid=”15727″]Image: US Navy View post tag: Navy View post tag: Naval Share this articlelast_img read more

May
3

Omkar suspended from Union

first_imgFailed Union Presidential candidate Krishna Omkar has had his membership suspended for two terms for bringing a ‘frivolous’ and ‘malicious’ complaint over a poll he initiated. The punishment, and a fine of £150, were handed down at a tribunal on Monday after Omkar accused a number of Union officials of improper conduct in a members’ poll. The poll, held last week, was an attempt by Omkar to change electoral rules. Had it been successful, it would have allowed the ex-Treasurer to run for President again. Current Union President Ben Tansey said, “Mr Omkar’s allegations against Mr Waldegrave, Mr Tryl and the Returning Officer were found to be on all accounts frivolous and not substantiated by any evidence, and the account against Mr Tryl in addition to being frivolous was also deemed to be malicious by the findings of the tribunal.” Krishna Omkar’s complaint alleged that the actions of Waldegrave, Tryl and the Returning Officer resulted in a “badly conducted poll.” “The Returning Officer admitted there were more votes in the box than there were voters, and there was clear first-hand testimony that some voters’ names had been struck off the roll without their having voted (which they discovered when they tried to vote)” he said. Omkar added, “The other fact that this throws up is the blatant, in-your-face hypocrisy of Union politics. I was disqualified and banned for having a slate and a slate meeting – a slate meeting at which all six current officers of the Union were present.” He also alleged that the use of slates in Union elections is a common practice. “Emily [Partington, ex-Union President] admitted to having a slate when she was asked at the King and Country debate last term,” he said. “Two weeks ago, Leo Marcus Wan and Charlie Holt admitted in Standing Committee to being on Josh Roche’s slate in last term’s election. Ed Waldegrave and Charlie Holt are both openly putting slates together for this term’s election. Yet all these people have constantly vilified me and told me that I deserved what I got. The point is that I have tried to change the rules, which are unfair – but I have been opposed by people who constantly break them, but do not want to change them as doing so would require an admission of guilt,” Omkar added. He suggested that he has been made a scapegoat by Union opponents, saying, “I’m not the cheat. I’m not the bad guy. I’ve been made into one.” The case originally came to light when a Union member went to vote in the poll and found that his name had already been crossed off the balloting list despite his not having voted. Krishna Omkar also claimed that some votes could not be accounted for and that this raised his suspicions as to whether the poll had been fixed, hence the subsequent tribunal. Tom Glasspool, Returning Officer at the Oxford Union, said “Krishna originally brought allegations of malpractice against Waldegrave and Tryl, and of interference against the then Extraordinary Returning Officer during the poll. All of these were found to be either not guilty, or that there was no charge to answer.” Initiating tribunals in the Union are extremely costly and can take many hours to conduct. It is alleged that the 18-hour tribunal on Monday cost the Union up to £1,000. In an account of the proceedings Tom Glasspool said, “The tribunal began at 10am, ran until 5pm when Mr Omkar was excused due to a pressing dinner engagement which he said he absolutely could not miss. The panel allowed him to attend this. The tribunal then re-convened at 10pm, running until 7am. This meant that the panel of 3 stayed at the Randolph for 2 nights each rather than just one at the Union’s expense. “A lot of people’s time and the Union’s money have gone into conducting tribunal proceedings which were deemed to be either malicious or frivolous, so once again infer from that what you will” he added. Current President Ben Tansey commented, “There was very little evidence of malpractice […] given the chance to consider it [the change in ruling] there has been a concrete ‘no’ from Union members.” Union member Rhiannon Ward commented, “It is a shame it ended so unpleasantly and even went to polling and a tribunal. He [Krishna] will be missed.” Although Krishna is suspended for 2 terms from the date of the tribunal, until 4th week of Hilary 2009, he will be able to continue to be an ordinary member once the suspension has ended. Union member Catherine Clark commented, “the worst thing is, he won’t get into the PT for free any more.”last_img read more

May
3

Students hold vigil in response to Syria air strike decision

first_imgA vigil in solidarity with the Syrian and Iraqi peoples was called last night on Cornmarket Street. It was organised in response to yesterday’s vote in parliament for Britain to join the coalition of nations conducting airstrikes against Isis militants in Syria.The vigil was was called by the Oxford Students’ Arab Cultural Society, Rhodes Must Fall Oxford, Oxford Campaign for Racial Awareness and Equality, Oxford Students’ Palestine Society, and is being supported by Oxford University Labour Club and Momentum Oxford, a successor organisation to Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour leadership campaign. 155 people clicked ‘attending’ on the vigil’s Facebook event, with a further 197 ‘interested’.The event description on Facebook declared, “Tonight we stand in solidarity with the people of Raqqa, Deir Ez-zor, Aleppo, Sinjar, Mosul, Haditha, Kirkuk, Kobane, Al Hassakeh, Baiji, Idlib, Mayadin, Al Anbar, Homs, Latakia, Mar’a, Ayn Isa, Nineveh and all the cities and towns across the Arab world facing bombing, with those who have been made homeless fleeing tyranny and those who struggle against it.”Dan Iley-Williamson, a spokesperson for Momentum Oxford, told Cherwell, “We wanted to express our solidarity with those in the Arab world whose lives and families are now threatened by coalition bombs, and to show that many people across Oxford – residents and students alike – condemn Cameron’s race to war as unjust and counterproductive.”He added, “With Jeremy Corbyn, we call for a fundamental change our country’s policy towards the Arab peoples. We also join with the wider labour movement in honouring our duty to welcome those fleeing for their lives to our country.”A spokesperson for OUSU’s Campaign for Racial Awareness and Equality (CRAE) told Cherwell, “CRAE stands in solidarity – always – with brown and black bodies under attack. We stand in solidarity with the people of Raqqa and all cities bombed by the coalition – in whatever capacity we can.“The decision taken by parliament yesterday shows that brown bodies cannot co-exist with imperialism. We must fight this logic on all fronts. They, the ones with the bloody hands, will hear us, because the humanity of people of colour is louder and brighter than them. They will hear us because we will make ourselves heard. We will make ourselves heard because we must – to recognise, celebrate and protect the humanity of the brown bodies in the Middle East against the imperialist coalition that would see them destroyed. They will not win because we will not let them win. The vigil tonight is an opportunity to stand in solidarity, for the dignity, humanity and courage of all people under attack by the coalition.”A demonstration against the bombings was also held last night by the Oxford Stop the War Coalition.Rhodes Must Fall and other organising groups have been contacted for comment.last_img read more

May
3

COMPLIMENTARY OBITUARIES NOW IN CITY-COUNTY OBSERVER

first_img COMPLIMENTARY OBITUARIES NOW IN CITY-COUNTY OBSERVER As you might have already noticed, the City-County Observer has made a serious effort in 2019 to provide complimentary obituaries to our readers. We feel it is our duty to honor the memory of the deceased and relay this information to the community without charging any fees.  We are pleased that we are in a position to help grieving family members during their time of need by publishing the obituaries of their loved ones at no costs.With that being said, we would like to take a moment to thank the following local funeral homes that have helped make our vision possible:Alexander Funeral Homes (Evansville And Newburgh)Ziemer Funeral Homes (Evansville)Scheider Funeral Home (Mt. Vernon)Koehler Funeral Home (Boonville And Chandler)Mason Brothers Memorial Chapel (Evansville And Henderson)Titzer Funeral Homes (Evansville-Newburgh)Pierre Funeral Home (Evansville)BOONE Funeral Home (Evansville)We look forward to adding one more funeral home in one obituary section in the near future. If you or anyone you know has influence with Browning FUNERAL Home we encourage you to ask them to contact the City-County Observer so we can discuss with them about putting their complimentary obituaries in our paper.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Apr
21

Silesia in for the grill

first_imgThe Silesia-Velox (stand B450) High Speed Contact Grill will be on constant demonstration at the show. All Silesia-Velox grills are available with smooth and grooved plates, in any combination desired, and come with a range of accessories. The company says its grills offer versatility and economy for minimum capital outlay, and that they can save bakers time and space while increasing profitability. They are said to be ideal for busy sandwich operations.last_img