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Archive of posts published in the category: fxjwodrf
Jun
16

Fundraising: Hands-on Tactics for Nonprofit Groups

first_imgFundraising: Hands-on Tactics for Nonprofit Groups About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  11 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 27 October 2007 | Newslast_img read more

Jun
14

Atrazine Important for Conservation Farming

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Atrazine Important for Conservation Farming By Hoosier Ag Today – Sep 7, 2016 A recent report from the Environmental Protection Agency was highly critical of the herbicide atrazine, which helps reduce soil erosion and runoff problems, keeping soil healthy and water clean. EPA released its draft ecological risk assessment as part of the re-registration process for atrazine; and, if its recommendations stand, farmers will basically lose the use of the herbicide. Tillage is an effective way to control weeds, but disturbing that top layer of soil leads to a loss of 90 percent of crop residue from the soil. Tillage damages the soil and leaves it more vulnerable to erosion from wind and water, which in turn leads to more runoff of fertilizer and pesticides. Atrazine was one of the first products to be used on a widespread basis because it is a broad spectrum product. It reduced the number of times farmers had to drive over their soil, and that decreased erosion and runoff problems.Iowa State University Professor of Weed Science Bob Hartzler said farmers have made significant progress adopting reduced-till and no-till methods of growing a crop and that atrazine plays a key role in making these practices more sustainable. The National Corn Growers wants farmers to comment on the EPA’s proposal at www.NCGA.Com/atz.Source: NAFB News Service Facebook Twitter Atrazine Important for Conservation Farming SHARE SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous articleImmigration, TPP, and Child Nutrition May be Lost CausesNext articleFarm Bureau puts Slogan into Action Hoosier Ag Todaylast_img read more

Jun
12

Law Offices of Donald P. Schweitzer Gives $21,500 to Foothill Unity Center Pediatric Mobile Dental Clinic

first_img 6 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Make a comment Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Business News Community News Herbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNerdy Movie Kids Who Look Unrecognizable TodayHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy More Cool Stuff First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community Newscenter_img The Law Office of Donald P. Schweitzer gave $21,500 to the Foothill Unity Center mobile dental clinic.The Law Office of Donald P. Schweitzer team – Casey Marticorena with Maria, Donald, and Selina SchweitzerWith the help of a last minute donation, the Law Offices of Donald P. Schweitzer handed over $21,500 to the Foothill Unity Center’s Pediatric Mobile Dental Clinic held at Santa Anita Park on Tuesday.Part of a larger Back-to-School event servicing low-income families with the supplies children in grades K-12 need to be ready for school, the dental clinic screening offers many children the opportunity to have their teeth checked for the first time.“The thought of kids going to school with root canals and not being able to smile or having the self confidence to succeed tugs at our hearts. We feel that we are really giving them a chance,” Schweitzer said.After the screening at Santa Anita Park, 120 children who were diagnosed with serious dental problems will receive additional pediatric dental procedures during the Mobile Dental Clinic week held at Beardslee Elementary School in Duarte on November 6.At past screenings, the USC dental students rushed one boy in an ambulance to receive immediate dental care because he was in pain from a root canal. Another boy had to receive 4 root canals.“We give to the Foothill Unity Center out of love. They are our children, they are our responsibility and we hope that by giving were inspiring more to inspire our footsteps to do the same,” Schweitzer said during the event. “We are not just a law practice in town, we are part of the community.”The Law Offices of Donald P. Schweitzer specialize in family law and estate planning.Each year the firm has doubled their contribution—giving $5000 the first year, then $10,000 and this year over $20,000 to the children’s dental clinic provided by USC’s Ostrow School of Dentistry.The Circle of Friends event hosted on Saturday June 27th at the Pasadena home of Annette and Sheldon Bull raised more than $16,000. Schweitzer gave a special thanks to Julie Lawson and Peter Stiefel as well as David and Miriam Donoho who contributed the final $5000 that pushed the efforts over the $20,000 goal.Maria Schweitzer said they hoped to still raise more up until the mobile dental clinic in November. She also welcomed Foothill Unity Center’s newest board member.“Having Greg Vanni on the board is a big win for the Foothill Unity Center. He is well known in the community and is a go getter when it comes to bringing in money and support for non profit organizations,” Maria Schweitzer said.The Foothill Unity Center provides of food, case management/crisis help, and access to health care resources across eleven San Gabriel Valley cities: Pasadena, Altadena, South Pasadena, Sierra Madre, Arcadia, Monrovia, Bradbury, Duarte, Azusa, Baldwin Park and Irwindale.“We are deeply grateful for the Schweitzer’s ongoing commitment to making sure our Mobile Dental Clinic continues,” Foothill Unity Center Executive Director Betty McWilliams said. “What Don and Maria have witnessed and shared is no exaggeration of the pediatric dental needs in our community. We thank the firm and their Circle of Friends for their support in relieving us from as much of the financial burden through their fundraising efforts.”For more information about Foothill Unity, please visit their web site at www.foothillunitycenter.org. For more information about The Law Offices of Donald P. Schweitzer, visit www.pasadenalawoffice.com. Giving Back Law Offices of Donald P. Schweitzer Gives $21,500 to Foothill Unity Center Pediatric Mobile Dental Clinic From STAFF REPORTS Published on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 | 5:17 pm faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Subscribe Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Top of the News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Jun
4

Peter O’Mahony returns to Munster team for Pro 14 clash with…

first_imgNewsPeter O’Mahony returns to Munster team for Pro 14 clash with ConnachtBy Jack Neville – January 4, 2019 602 Advertisement Email WhatsApp Linkedin Munster water carrier Peter O’Mahony prior to the Guinness PRO14 Round 12 match between Munster and Leinster at Thomond Park in Limerick. Photo by Diarmuid Greene/SportsfileMunster Head Coach Johann van Graan has named his side to face Connacht at the Sportsground in the Guinness PRO14 tomorrow night at 7.35pm.There are seven changes to the side that defeated Leinster at Thomond Park last weekend.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Peter O’Mahony captains the side as Chris Farrell returns from injury with Tommy O’Donnell, Alex Wootton, Alby Mathewson, Jeremy Loughman and Arno Botha also coming into the starting XV.Billy Holland is named among the replacements and is set to make a landmark 200th Munster appearance. In doing so, Holland will become just the 10th Munster player to play 200 games for the province.Andrew Conway moves to full-back for the clash with Keith Earls on the right flank and Wootton on the opposite wing.Dan Goggin is joined by Farrell in the centres with Mathewson and Joey Carbery in the half-backs.Loughman packs down in the front row with Niall Scannell and John Ryan as Jean Kleyn and last week’s Man of the Match Tadhg Beirne keep their places in the second row.O’Mahony, O’Donnell and Botha complete the side.Munster: Andrew Conway; Keith Earls, Chris Farrell, Dan Goggin, Alex Wootton; Joey Carbery, Alby Mathewson; Jeremy Loughman, Niall Scannell, John Ryan; Jean Kleyn, Tadhg Beirne; Peter O’Mahony (C), Tommy O’Donnell, Arno Botha.Replacements: Kevin O’Byrne, Dave Kilcoyne, Stephen Archer, Billy Holland, CJ Stander, Conor Murray, Tyler Bleyendaal, Sammy Arnold.The post Peter O’Mahony returns to Munster team for Pro 14 clash with Connacht appeared first on Sporting Limerick.center_img Facebook Previous articleUniversity Hospital Limerick was the worst for overcrowding last yearNext articleBucket puppies just two of many Jack Neville Twitter Printlast_img read more

May
9

Ice sheet history from Antarctic continental margin Sediments: the ANTOSTRAT approach

first_imgThe Antarctic Ice Sheet is today an important part of the global climate engine, and probably has been so for most of its long existence. However, the details of its history are poorly known, despite the measurement and use, over two decades, of low-latitude proxies of ice sheet volume. An additional way of determining ice sheet history is now available, based on understanding terrigenous sediment transport and deposition under a glacial regime. It requires direct sampling of the prograded wedge of glacial sediments deposited at the Antarctic continental margin (and of derived sediments on the continental rise) at a small number of key sites, and combines the resulting data using numerical models of ice sheet development. The new phase of sampling is embodied mainly in a suite of proposals to the Ocean Drilling Program, generated by separate regional proponent groups co-ordinated through ANTOSTRAT (the Antarctic Offshore Acoustic Stratigraphy initiative). The first set of margin sites has now been drilled as ODP Leg 178 to the Antarctic Peninsula margin, and a first, short season of inshore drilling at Cape Roberts, Ross Sea, has been completed. Leg 178 and Cape Roberts drilling results are described briefly here, together with an outline of key elements of the overall strategy for determining glacial history, and of the potential contributions of drilling other Antarctic margins investigated by ANTOSTRAT. ODP Leg 178 also recovered continuous ultra-high-resolution Holocene biogenic sections at two sites within a protected, glacially-overdeepened basin (Palmer Deep) on the inner continental shelf of the Antarctic Peninsula. These and similar sites from around the Antarctic margin are a valuable resource when linked with ice cores and equivalent sections at lower latitude sites for studies of decadal and millenial-scale climate variation.last_img read more

May
4

Bataan amphibious group completes first SWATT

first_imgThe US Navy amphibious ready group (ARG) assembled around amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) has completed its first Surface Warfare Advanced Tactical Training (SWATT) exercise.For the Bataan ARG, SWATT provided an important transition from single ship operations to multi-ship, aircraft, and landing craft operations in scenarios that spanned multiple warfare areas.SWATTs are a relatively new construct in the surface fleet that deliver advanced tactical training to increase surface force lethality and tactical proficiency by providing warfare commander and unit level training beyond the basic phase.“SWATTs prepare individuals, watch teams, ships and staffs to be more capable, ready and lethal to ‘Own the Fight,’” said Capt. Lance Lesher, commodore of Amphibious Squadron 8. “It’s crucial that ships’ crews are prepared to work together, communicate and face all varieties of challenges at sea. That need is amplified when you have multiple ships conducting coordinated operations as a group.”SWATT exercises are conducted in two phases. The first phase of the Bataan ARG SWATT — like similar SWATTs — was an in-port academic session. After the in-port phase, underway training commenced when all the ships, aircraft and landing craft that make up the Bataan ARG — including USS Bataan (LHD 5), USS New York (LPD 21), USS Oak Hill (LSD 51), and embarked Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 28 (HSC 28) and Naval Beach Group 2 assets — completed training events to sharpen their warfighting skills.These events included conducting integrated air and missile defense (IAMD), anti-submarine / surface warfare (ASW/SUW), amphibious warfare (AMW), information warfare (IW), mine warfare (MIW), ship maneuvering, and live-fire events designed to tactically prepare surface forces for maritime warfare missions.Since 2016, there have been 11 SWATT exercises completed by carrier strike group cruiser-destroyer units and ARGs. View post tag: US Navy View post tag: SWATT Photo: San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD 21) fires a Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) during SWATT. Photo: US Navycenter_img View post tag: Bataan ARG Share this articlelast_img read more

May
2

Hooked on Houses: The Little Pink Cottage That Could

first_imgBy Maureen SchneiderIt all started as a whale’s tale – literally. David and Bernice Losinno took a day trip to Sea Isle City to lay eyes upon a beached whale in the fall of 2016. They missed seeing the whale but ended up seeing and subsequently purchasing something far different in Ocean City. The Losinnos rode home to Pennsylvania as the new owners of the “Little Pink Cottage that Could.”In 1879, four Methodist ministers (Ezra B. Lake, James Lake, S. Wesley Lake and William Burrell) chose the town and established a Christian retreat. Overlooking the grounds of the Ocean City Tabernacle, the Losinnos’ recently restored home was built a year later in 1880 by the Lake Brothers. The home was erected for and inhabited by Simon Wesley Lake Sr.It is said that buyers know within seconds of entering a home if it is the right fit for them. Bernice knew right away, claiming that the house “spoke to her.” David is still wondering what the heck it said!Owners Bernice and David Losinno lovingly restored the old home.This home is a key contributing structure to Ocean City’s Historic District, which was recently touted by Coastal Living magazine. The magazine refers to the “Residential Historic District full of bungalows and beach cottages making year-round life feel like an old-fashioned vacation.”The couple worked closely with both the Historical Committee and the Preservation Society to return this gem to its former glory. Yet instead of gutting and renovating it, they feel they have “restored” the tiny beauty. David estimates that in addition to the many months contractors spent on the home, he and Bernice have over 4,700-plus hours of sweat equity invested.They painstakingly took on much of the interior and exterior restoration themselves. Missing cupboard and closet doors, newel posts and spindles, as well as fireplace surrounds were collected from salvage yards in Philadelphia and subsequently installed.The historic pink house features a comfortable front porch.They found their new “old” front door discarded in the alley, a perfect fit for this vintage home. This cottage is adorned in a colonial style, with both vintage and antique items nestled throughout. The newly rebuilt front porch is complete with painted white rockers and a cozy swing for long breezy after-beach naps. Life couldn’t get any better for these two.More than 138 years old, this house could tell some tall tales. Neighbors and visitors alike have watched the couple renovate over the past year and a half. Some are stopping by for a tour of their childhood vacation home, some simply thanking the couple for their efforts to save this local treasure.As one of the finishing touches, the couple chose the signature pink paint for the exterior of the home. The fresh paint encapsulates and protects this historic home, ensuring it will go on to host many more dinner parties, sleepovers, early morning coffee cliques and lazy afternoons on one of the best front porches in town.Quaint steps lead to the cozy third floor.The story of this house mimics the storyline of “The Little Engine that Could,” which instills the value of optimism and hard work. This cottage was built upon these values back in 1879 and restored as “The Little Pink Cottage that Could” with these same values in mind more than a century later.To SEA MORE of “The Little Pink Cottage that Could” like SeaMorewithMaureen on Facebook, or follow SeaMorewithMaureen on Instagram. Does your home have a story to tell?  Send me an email at [email protected] house includes the original cupboard dating from 1880.Bernice Losinno’s bike sits waiting for her along a small pathway.A stately stairway connects the first floor to the second.The porch is a haven for relaxation time.last_img read more

May
2

Late Field Goal Sinks Red Raiders

first_imgRed Raiders get ready to take the field Friday night against Mainland. (Photos courtesy Dennis Green) By Tim KellyThis was Ocean City-Mainland to the max. The high-energy game featured two evenly matched teams going at it for 48 minutes. Unfortunately for the Raiders, “The War at the Shore” did not have a happy ending.Sean Corey booted a wind-aided 41-yard field goal with three seconds left on the clock to lead Mainland to a wild 24-21 win at gusty Carey Stadium. “It’s hard to complain when you lose on a 40-yard field goal,” Ocean City coach Kevin Smith said. “We had that great drive to tie it and (Mainland) did what they had to do in the limited amount of time they had available.”Ocean City had tied the game by driving 80 yards on 12 plays in the last four minutes, against the wind, highlighted by Ian Aungst’s two passes for 20 and 18 yards, respectively, to Billy Kroeger and the 14-yard drive-capper, also to Kroeger. The drive was made even more impressive by the gusting wind coming off the ocean and blowing directly into the faces of the Red Raiders. The National Weather Service said the gusts were topping 50 mph in Ocean City. The drive set up the crucial two-point conversion, with Aungst finding Brandon Lashley in the corner of the end zone, knotting the score at 21.Mainland (6-2 overall, 4-0 league) clinched an NJSIAA playoff berth with the win, as well as the West Jersey Football League Independence Division title. Ocean City dropped to 3-4 overall, 3-1 in the league. After starting out 3-0, the Raiders have now dropped four straight games.“We’re still mathematically alive (for the playoffs) but I can’t think about that now,” Smith said afterwards.  Ocean City seniors are honored before the game as part of Senior Night festivities.Ocean City scored first when Jake Schneider ran back a punt to the Mustangs’ 40 and Aungst hit on a 19-yarder to Schneider, and got 14 more to Lashley. Then Aungst found Lashley in the right corner of the end zone for the TD. Brandon McGonigle’s PAT made it 7-0 late in the first quarter. Mainland came back after OC failed to convert a fourth-and-one at the Mainland 48, and quarterback Dean Hall engineered a seven-play scoring drive capped by a 12-yard Joe Salome run and Corey booted the PAT to tie it. On Mainland’s next possession, Ocean City defenders Austin Green, Travis Stoerrie and Will Drain forced a Mustang fumble, which Brandon Lin pounced on at the Mainland 43.Then Smith dipped into his bag of trick plays and Lashley took the ball on a reverse and launched a perfect 31-yard pass to Jaden Toci-Rogers, and Aungst capped the drive with a four-yard run to the right side of the Mainland defense. The kick failed, making it 13-7 OC. Mainland grabbed its first lead late in the third when Joe Massari ran for 31 yards on a reverse and Corey’s extra point made it 14-13 Mainland. Things looked particularly bleak for the Raiders after Mainland upped the lead to 21-13 on a 69-yard 10-play drive and another Corey point after. Then, after Ocean City’s valiant game-tying drive, Corey lined up for his game-winning boot. “It felt amazing coming off my foot, I knew I had a chance to make it, especially with the wind,” Corey said. “I wasn’t nervous at all.” Both teams shook hands and had left the field when the officials discovered three seconds remained on the clock.  The squads returned to the field for the kickoff, which sailed out of bounds, giving OC one last shot from their 40.  But the pass failed as time expired.Austin Green (83) and Travis Stoerrie have a word before the Mainland game.last_img read more

Mar
1

Mapping the future

first_imgAfter 18 months of quiet effort, a committee of scholars from within the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) released a set of three reports this week on teaching the arts and humanities at Harvard College. The lengthiest one, “Mapping the Future,” is a 70-page analysis of what the trends are, what the stakes are, and what steps the future requires.In sum, the trend is downward for undergraduates concentrating in the arts and humanities. The stakes are high for beleaguered departments. And the action steps are plain: more attention to freshmen exploring concentrations, broader courses, and more cross-discipline collaboration.“We really want to be present,” said Arts and Humanities Dean Diana Sorensen, “not just as a signpost but as a practice.”The three reports were inspired in early 2012 by a request from Sorensen. The first, “Mapping the Future,” focused on the philosophical underpinnings of the humanities, its present state at Harvard College, and its aspirations. A second, the Curriculum Working Group Mission Statement, took on curricular reform and announced a first step: a series of “gateway” courses to the humanities to be offered in the fall. A third report, “Addendum,” characterized the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard as an intellectual crossroads, a place where the integrative spirit of the humanities is already playing out (though largely for faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students). Its author was Center Director Homi K. Bhabha, Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities, who called for gateway courses that “audaciously cross disciplinary hubs” at Harvard.An ongoing divisional initiativeThe report is the first product of what will be an ongoing divisional initiative, what Sorensen calls the Humanities Project. At Harvard College, the goal is to make the humanities more vitally collaborative across disciplines, she said. “We show what we’re good for.”“We live in a world where social media has allowed everyone to be an interpreter and commentator. Ideas are the currency of today and tomorrow — in every discipline and industry — and powerful, persuasive arguments are what hold the day,” said FAS Dean Michael D. Smith. “The humanistic competencies of communication, interpretation, and argument are more relevant and more widely practiced than ever. A Harvard College education must provide our students with the ability to interpret ideas, regardless of discipline, in order to prepare them for the world they will enter.”The humanities commonly include literature, philosophy, the classics, film studies, art history, music, and religious studies. History is traditionally included, though Harvard groups that with the social sciences. By way of a definition, the humanities “emphasize the importance of linguistic training,” said Bhabha, “and the powers of communication through argument, interpretation, and discussion.”Bhabha was one of three co-chairs of “Mapping the Future,” which combined statistics, philosophy, historical context, and aspirations. Joining him were Sean Kelly, professor and chair of the Department of Philosophy, and James Simpson, the Donald P. and Katherine B. Loker Professor of English.All three reports come at a time when the culture at large seems to be considering the utility of a branch of learning whose mission is to describe, evaluate, imagine, and reimagine the human experience. The report acknowledges what some analysts might call a moment of cultural doubt in these beleaguered disciplines, but it also states its biggest goal: the “collective assertion of the humanities as an essential foundational element in American liberal arts education.”After studying data that goes back decades, “Mapping the Future” acknowledged that art and philosophy are “where the meanings are,” but increasingly where the undergraduates are not.Since 1966, the number of humanities bachelor’s degrees awarded nationally has slipped from 14 to 7 percent. At Harvard College, the percentage of humanities concentrators has fallen from 24 to 17 percent since 1954. If you count history (not officially regarded as a humanities concentration at Harvard), the six-decade decline is even steeper: from 36 to 20 percent.Among arriving freshmen in the Class of 2006, 27 percent said they would concentrate in the humanities. When the Class of 2016 arrived, the number of would-be humanities concentrators had sagged to 18 percent.In a way, it gets worse, said Simpson, whose literary specialties are medieval and Renaissance English, but who appreciates the power of data. Within three semesters, he said, 57 percent of that 18 percent surrender their plans to study the humanities. More than half move over to the social sciences, chiefly to government, psychology, and economics.That’s the darkest data point, said Simpson, but it’s offset by a brighter one: Arts and humanities concentrators have the highest levels of satisfaction within the College, and the highest levels of adherence. Once in a concentration, they stay. “We don’t have a crisis here,” he said. “We have a tremendous opportunity, and we have a challenge.”The task is clear, said Simpson. “We should be focusing on freshmen.”Lessons and action “Mapping the Future” lists action points, and the ones highest on it refer to the youngest students. The report called on the College to:Develop resources for that “freshman-year challenge,” including a strong humanities component during Visitas and freshman orientation.Open an arts and humanities version of i-lab.Found a student group modeled on the Institute of Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School (that is, a student-run venue to host visits by top practitioners).Create more art and exhibition spaces.Get multiyear funding for internships that allow undergraduates to experience an arts career firsthand.Investigate more cross-School courses and co-teaching.Fund new faculty positions.If an institution beyond Harvard wants to adopt these action points, it is welcome to do so. But Simpson and others were explicit: The report is intended for Harvard College alone. Widen the intended audience, said Bhabha, “and you start speaking from 36,000 feet. You become sovereign and imperial. All learning should be on the ground and not in the air.”The report identified other Harvard College imperatives that rise out of the data. Among them:Arrest and reverse the decline in humanities concentrators.Focus efforts on the first three semesters of study.Continue providing “demonstrably excellent undergraduate teaching,” as measured by satisfaction levels.Reaffirm that Harvard’s critical tradition of undergraduate teaching is general and interdisciplinary.Expand ways of collaborating with the social sciences and with other Schools.Emphasize that the humanities represent solid launching pads into professional schools.National statistics bear out the findings. Professional schools such as law and medicine admit humanities majors at similar, and sometimes higher, rates as any other branch of study.The humanities produce graduates who go into a surprising range of careers. Kelly mentioned a few students who graduated with degrees in philosophy. They are lawyers and journalists now, he said, along with comedy writers and graduate students. To illustrate the intellectual diaspora, starting next semester, he added, “We are very interested in bringing alumni back” to tell their stories.Sorensen had the same vision. “The arts and humanities give you all the tools for all the other jobs you will have,” she said. “We see them as creating habits of mind that stand you in good stead — no matter what for.”New curricular directions The Curriculum Working Group was co-chaired by Julie Buckler, professor of Slavic languages and literatures, and department chair, and Shigehisa Kuriyama, Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History and chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations.Citing the “profound and direct relevance” of the humanities to undergraduates, the working group acknowledged that the focus must be on Harvard College, and in particular on those first three semesters of study. It recommended creating more curricular and extra-curricular pathways into the humanities that could attract concentrators from every field of study. That requires expanding outreach to freshmen. And it requires expanding advising programs.Creating new pathways would also involve renewed attention to the Freshman Seminar Program. That means encouraging faculty to offer such courses, especially ones that involve compellingly fundamental themes like time, justice, love, or happiness. Eventually, Freshman Seminars might cluster around a common theme, opening the way to joint activities or meetings.The first official curricular step in the Humanities Project will be a series of gateway courses in 2013-2014: intentional, focused invitations to experience the arts and humanities. These humanities framework courses reflect three directions for learning: the art of listening, the art of reading, and the art of looking. “These square with the recommendations,” said Simpson of his committee, for “courses that offer freshmen a clear pathway to the humanities.”Some of these courses might count toward concentration credit, a step that the working group called “accreditation.”By 2014-15, gateway courses may be gathered into a proposed sequence, Humanities 1 and Humanities 2.Starting this fall, the working group also proposed creating an arts and humanities section in the undergraduate course offerings, along with an enhanced navigation tool that makes it easier to find courses thematically. The group proposed junior and senior seminars to bridge the arts and humanities disciplines with all the others. This echoes a subtext with the Humanities Project, to build community.A committee of scholars from within the Faculty of Arts and Sciences released a set of three reports this week on teaching the arts and humanities at Harvard College. The three reports were inspired in early 2012 by a request from Arts and Humanities Dean Diana Sorensen (front row, center), seen here with the reports’ faculty contributors. Photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerThe curriculum group also looked beyond 2014-15. It envisions eventual course clusters that explore a single theme or problem, creating a “mini-culture” of students focused on a common issue. The future could also bring a humanities secondary field designed for concentrators from other divisions. Eventually, curricular reform could even mean piloting an interdisciplinary humanities concentration, a rigorous program of individual study modeled on the current idea of special concentrations.Other initiatives are still just being talked about, said Sorensen. One might examine “the city and the humanities,” in a partnership involving the arts, humanities, and disciplines at the Graduate School of Design (GSD). (Another subtext of the report involves more interplay between graduate and undergraduate students.)A new secondary field is being discussed, too, the public humanities, which would illuminate the role of culture in statesmanship. “The arts and humanities create a sense of civic virtue,” said Sorensen.The hostile arguments “Mapping the Future” includes imperatives arising from decades of data. It outlines a complex action plan looking ahead a decade or more. But it also acknowledges the challenges the humanities face. Chief among these are the “hostile arguments” that exist most powerfully in the corridors of political power, in the thinking of skeptical parents, and in the minds of college graduates saddled with record school debt.Here is a sharp taste of these arguments:The “economic argument” comes from a shift in the sense of what universities are for, a movement that began following World War II. “Knowledge of the humanities,” the argument goes, “is no practical response to the most pressing practical challenges we face.”The “cultural and social arguments” hold that art and literature are no longer tools for nation building, as they were once explicitly in France and Russia, and more mutedly in the United States. The humanities are now a “low-level factor” on that plane, the report said. Instead of building nations, the argument goes, the humanities “offer us private understanding, pleasure, and consolation.”The “scientific argument” perhaps looms largest in the public imagination. It holds that the sciences and the social sciences do not pretend to create universal truths. But they seem to create knowledge based on quantifiable experiments — a comforting thought to a public hungry for certainty. The knowledge produced by the humanities, said the report’s authors, “looks soft by comparison, forever relative, forever a matter of mere interpretation.”The “vocational argument,” common during debates at American kitchen tables, avers that humanities departments “are failing in the vocational marketplace” and that declining enrollments are proof of that. To paraphrase the line of argument as explained in the report: To be successful, a university discipline studies money, attracts money through research, and promises graduates a lot of money in future income.Finally there is the “technological argument.” For centuries, societies throughout the world have understood themselves by way of immersion in their cultural art forms: hours at a loom or a potter’s wheel; nights of tales told by firelight; endless days sunk into worlds created by the printed word.However, the report said, “Deep immersion is no longer the order of the technological day. New technologies disfavor the long march of narrative, just as they mitigate against sustained imaginative engagement.” In the humanities, the report said, studies of “the high arts” may give way to “media studies.” The authors cited an article that recommends a radical strategy for the American humanities. It was subtitled, “Blow them up and start again.”Origins that matter “Mapping the Future” is not about to recommend blowing up a centuries-old humanities tradition that still resonates with universal truths. The authors simply recommend bringing traditions into the 21st century in a way that speaks to modern concerns.“We are in the present ourselves,” said Simpson of humanistic scholars. “But that which has been recovered from the past can help with answers of the present.”The sciences discover knowledge, and the humanities recover knowledge, he said. The humanities can address problems that may seem modern but that people have confronted again and again, from monarchy to feminism to ecological decline. “The humanities almost always tell us the same thing, that there is nothing new under the sun,” said Simpson, and the field’s “long stories” can be a comfort and a guide. “We understand [problems] better by having access to that deep archive.”The humanities also inform governance, said Bhabha. “To be a citizen, you require a great deal of cultural literacy. It’s the humanities that supply it.”Along with the other authors of the report, Bhabha values and honors the work of the sciences. “Experimentation is hugely important,” he said, but it is best leavened with “humanistic interpretation. There is something about [experimentation] that allows itself to close half an eye to human values in the name of discovery.”There is also something appealing about the lack of stasis suggested by the humanities, said Kelly, since “they’re unlike a certain geometrical system, where you get a clear answer that is correct for all time.” If your learning is girded with philosophy, literature, and the other arts, he said, “We have a future that in some ways is always up for interpretation.”The humanities bring values into interpretations of the world, as well as a shifting, flexible sensibility that matches changing mores. They also bring the gift of expression, said Bhabha, “the very act of literacy — teaching people to read, to express themselves, to argue, and to transfer their own ideas.”“Transferable competencies” In its first pages, “Mapping the Future” outlines what Simpson called the “transferable competencies,” the tools provided by the arts and humanities to describe experience, to evaluate it, to imagine it, and then to transform it.The tools of description have resulted in a long list of established adjectives that are still useful in grappling with the complexity of the human experience. Life can be “tragic” or “comic.” The world can be “sublime” or “harmonious.” It can be described in ways that are “elegiac” or “satiric.”The tools of evaluation are required for the act of criticism, a central practice of the humanities. This “rigorous, receptive responsiveness to art and philosophy,” the report said, “provokes … an answering responsibility to the world.” Evaluation denies that the business of the humanities is precious and private. It provides a critical framework for judging the world.Then there are the tools of imagining and transforming the world at large. “Just as the engineer makes life-transforming models,” the report said of the humanities, so too the artist and scholar help to “imagine the remaking of an always recalcitrant world.”Besides outlining the tools that remain unchanged, “Mapping the Future” goes back in history to origins that matter, to the landscape of what the humanities once were and how they adapted in response to a changing world.During the Middle Ages, in the few universities that existed, there were seven liberal arts: the trivium (“three ways”) of grammar, logic, and rhetoric; and the quadrivium (“four ways”) of arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy. All seven were in service of philosophy, “the master discipline,” which was later conflated with theology. (Poetry was excluded from the liberal arts, dismissed as “a fiction with no bearing on the truth.”)Later in the Middle Ages came the studia humanitatis, which resembled the modern humanities. Its chief practices were rhetoric, philology, and history — separate from theology (and later from science). With this new order came a radical idea: To understand the past, you have to recover original texts, the ad fontes, whose rigorous parsing is central to humanities scholarship to this day.In the 15th century came another radical idea, that the humanities were not just scholarly, but were prompts to civic action. The practice of “rhetoric” — structuring arguments for persuasion, often in oratory — was thought to underlay good government. During the Renaissance, the humanities added the idea that art-making “was an intellectual as well as a manual activity,” according to the report’s authors.  In turn, the classics encouraged the idea that both texts and archaeological artifacts could illuminate the human experience.In the mid-19th century, the humanities began to acquire a modern cast because the disciplines became secular. Modern hermeneutics (textual interpretation) started with Bible criticism, but even the Bible was eventually viewed as a historical document rather than a divine one.Today, the humanities contain three traditions, each in tension with the others: disinterested scholarship, practical skills (such as rhetoric), and enlightened civic action. At the same time, the humanities are in tension with the modern world because the claims of liberality seem counter to the way the world works. We are, say the humanities, free from the pressures of economic survival, free from vested interests in producing knowledge, and free from ideological (or religious) pre-judgments.Of course, said “Mapping the Future,” the humanities are “motivated one way or another by the needs of now. But a liberal education is not determined by those pressures. It stands back from, and adjacent to, such pressures, reaches deeper, and looks … from a longer, more disinterested perspective.”The modern humanities are “dangerous” too, the report said in a section authored by Kelly, the philosophy professor. Rhetoric can persuade in ways that overturn convention; criticism may challenge authority. To some, this may fuel another argument against the humanities. After all, this branch of study hews to what is perhaps a culturally threatening task, the report states: “to unmask the operations of power.”The humanities have this critical strain, he said, which represents “the power and the danger” of shaking up what may seem the verities in a given era. But they are also “preservational,” said Kelly, a means of conserving common practices “that have value and are being lost.”In the end, the humanities represent “a potentially perilous pursuit,” the report says. “But a culture that has no mechanism for bringing its most fundamental commitments into question is a culture that risks stagnation and even potentially moral decline.”Changes in cultural mores will occur again, just as slavery was overturned and the disenfranchisement of women was discredited. When debates flare up during the next major period of change, the humanities need to be there as a moral compass, “Mapping the Future” said. “The domains they characterize [are the] domains of freedom and justice, of reason and goodness, of beauty and right and perhaps even of truth.”last_img read more

Mar
1

Strong enrollment for Class of 2019

first_imgNearly 81 percent of the students admitted to the Class of 2019 plan to enroll in August. Last year, 80.9 percent matriculated; 81 percent did so the year before. The last time Harvard’s yield on admitted students reached these levels was 1969 for the Class of 1973.“In the face of record-setting snowfall this year, enrollment projections were challenging. Nevertheless, a number of factors led to the high yield, including Harvard’s robust financial aid program, which once again made it possible for many of the nation’s and the world’s best students to choose to come to Harvard,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid.Harvard is more affordable than most public universities for 90 percent of American families. Families with annual incomes of $65,000 or less pay absolutely nothing toward the total cost — tuition, room and board, and student fees — of their child’s Harvard College education. The total annual cost rises to only $15,000 for families earning $150,000. Families with higher incomes can also receive need-based aid depending on individual circumstances, including having multiple children in college or unusual medical expenses.More than 64 percent of students planning to enroll applied for financial aid compared with 62 percent last year, one measure of the economic diversity of the class. “Despite the financial challenges facing a large percentage of families today, Harvard remains accessible for students from all economic backgrounds, and all students are able to graduate debt-free,” said Sarah C. Donahue, Griffin Director of Financial Aid.Harvard’s yield is particularly notable because the College does not offer athletic or other non-need-based scholarships. In addition, Harvard’s early action program, unlike binding early decision programs, allows admitted students to apply elsewhere and asks only that they reply by May 1 after comparing other offers of admission and financial aid. Such freedom and flexibility allow a student more time to choose the college that provides the best match, a factor contributing to Harvard’s nearly 98 percent graduation rate.“We are particularly pleased that nearly 49 percent of the class are women, compared to 45 percent last year,” said Marlyn E. McGrath, director of admissions. “Women made up 48 percent of the admitted students, and the yield on women this year was very high, at 82 percent.”The geographical origins of the Class of 2019 are similar to those of last year’s entering class, and there were slight increases for Asian-Americans (more than 21 percent of the class), Latinos (nearly 12 percent), African-Americans (nearly 11 percent), and Native Americans (1.6 percent).All admitted students were invited to campus April 25–27 as part of the College’s annual Visitas weekend. Admitted freshmen, often accompanied by family members, come for their first true taste of campus life. Prospective students stay with hosts in the freshman dorms or Harvard’s Houses; attend lectures, panel discussions, and activity fairs; eat in the dining halls; and explore the University’s diverse academic and extracurricular offerings.“The spirit of Visitas was particularly vibrant this year, with nearly 1,000 of our undergraduates serving as hosts and other facilitators,” said Visitas Director Timothy J. Smith. “The Freshman Dean’s Office and the Houses went out of their way to give students a realistic view of life at Harvard.”“The Undergraduate Minority Recruitment Program (UMRP) once again worked tirelessly throughout the year and especially during Visitas, with UMRP and other minority students hosting over 25 percent of participants,” added Roger Banks, director of recruitment and co-director of UMRP.Faculty and administrators also played a critical role in the program, which featured a welcome by President Drew Faust. “Faculty involvement in recruiting admitted students reached new heights this year,” said Fitzsimmons.“For example, the Arts and Humanities faculty, led by Dean Diana Sorensen, held a well-attended open house during Visitas and used a variety of social media,” said McGrath. The yield on prospective humanities concentrators was 83.2 percent, and the percentage of the class planning a humanities concentration jumped from 14.1 percent to 15.4 percent.Admitted students who were unable to travel to Cambridge could still experience a “Virtual Visitas” through a combination of live-streamed presentations, interactive Google “Hangouts On Air,” and social-media content shared through the hashtag “WelcometoHarvard.”This year’s high yield means about 60 to 70 applicants will be admitted from the waiting list. That number will be determined over the next few weeks as admitted students decide whether to defer admission to pursue other opportunities that often develop during May and June.last_img read more