Category Archives

Archive of posts published in the category: bvsxtwws
May
9

Marine colonization and biodiversity at Ascension Island and remote islands

first_imgLittle is known about colonization of remote island coasts by marine invertebrates, other than corals. The structure of hard substrata assemblages was investigated across Ascension Island’s littoral zone in comparison with other sites. Arrays of acrylic panels were deployed at two sites for 2 years at Ascension Island to measure subtidal recruitment. Colonization of panels at Ascension I. was low, though space occupation, abundance and richness varied considerably. After ~1 and 2 years Ascension panels were <17 and <37% covered by fauna and each had 30% covered, with>76 recruits per 100 cm2 and with bryozoans well represented after 1 year. Across-littoral surveys of established macrofauna at five remote islands (Ascension I., Easter I., Azores, South Georgia and Signy I., Antarctica) revealed similar trends of a rich sublittoral and lower littoral reducing drastically up-shore; molluscs dominating abundance and species numbers, whilst polychaetes, crustaceans and echinoderms were well represented. Established sessile animals occurred patchily at a mean density of 8.26 m−2 but recruits had mortality levels >99%. Polar or remote temperate/tropical sites are typically less colonized than at non-remote, low latitudes but the lowest levels reported are at remote polar sites. Reduced colonization at Ascension island reflects remoteness.last_img read more

May
3

IS IT TRUE JUNE 2, 2017

first_img IS IT TRUEI that local attorney and current IU Alumni Board of Trustee member Patrick Shoulders has been a strong and independent voice on the Board.?  … the Bloomington newspaper wrote that Mr. Shoulders has been the “the conscience of the University.”?  …we agree with that statement and urge all IU Alumni to cast their votes to re-elect Mr. Shoulders to the IU Board of Trustees?IS IT TRUE that downtown Evansville is getting another shot in the arm that is a surprise to many people who didn’t see this coming?…German American Bank which gained an Evansville presence when they acquired the home grown Bank of Evansville several years ago?…German American has announced that it will be moving into the old Integra Bank Building that has been bankless since Integra was taken over by the FDIC nearly six years ago?…this is a big win for downtown Evansville and it puts a business in a building that would have taken many years to fill?…the CCO sees this decision as a positive decision for German American and for Evansville?IS IT TRUE that the pending opening of the medical school does seem to have opened a window of opportunity for downtown Evansville to make some gains that were blunted by premature ambitions of the Weinzapfel Administration?…concentrating on what needs to happen at home as opposed to one person wanting to scale the ladder of political success toward Indianapolis or even Washington DC, is beginning to pay off?…with the opening of the McCurdy Apartments,  the Lincoln Estates Apartments now into private hands and much needed renovations begins, and the soon to be opening of the IU Medical School, the vision for a vibrant downtown may finally be on the radar?…there will be winners and losers in this time of transition?IS IT TRUE we just heard from credible sources that the Zoo Director Amos Morris is leaving his position with  Mesker Zoo in about month?  …word in the street is he is leaving to take a position somewhere in California?    …we wonder if the self proclaimed Zoo expert Councilman Dan McGinn will resign his Council seat and take Mr. Morris position?  …one good thing about Mr. Morris move to California is he will be able to hang out with the “penguins”?Todays “Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that Downtown Evansville is moving in the right direction?FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

May
2

PINEIRO, MICHAEL

first_img81, died on March 24, 2018 at Cornell Hall Care & Rehabilitation Center in Union, NJ. Born in Caldebarcos, Spain, he lived in Bayonne and Elizabeth before moving to Roselle Park. Michael was the son of the late Jose Pineiro and the late Maria Pineiro of Bayonne, NJ and was pre-deceased by his first wife, Maryanne Pineiro. He is also survived by a brother Manuel Pineiro (Maria) and a sister, Josephine Lobbe (Arthur). Michael was a graduate of Bayonne High School and a Peacetime Army Veteran. Prior to his retirement in 2009, Michael was employed by Petro Heating Company as an HVAC Technician. Michael is survived by his wife Carmen Angela, and children, Theresa Caporaso (Michael), Dolores Pineiro, Michael Pineiro (Karol) and Maria Silva (Luis). He leaves behind 12 grandchildren, six great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral arrangements by OPACITY Funeral Home, 511 Washington Ave., Kenilworth, NJ.last_img read more

May
2

Mayor Jay Gillian: Proud of Partnership With Philippines

first_imgDear Friends,I would like to welcome Consul General Mario DeLeon, Jr. of the Philippines to Ocean City for our 5th Annual Tribute to the Philippines. On Saturday, I will have the pleasure of discussing Ocean City’s on-going Sister-City relationship with San Jose Occidental Mindoro of the Philippines with the Consul General. Ocean City Food Cupboard’s Dottie Cianci, Mayor Jay Gillian and Philippine Deputy Consul Zaldy Patron as the city donates the proceeds of the first Mr. Mature America Pageant to charity in May 2014. The following is Ocean City Mayor Jay Gillian’s weekly update to citizens posted on Friday, July 18. The tribute to the Philippines will be Saturday and Sunday in the loggia area of the Music Pier.  Admission is free, and the hours are from 9 a.m. till 4 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. The tribute includes an exhibition of Filipino crafts, products, and packaged food, plus information about the Country, along with entertainment featuring Filipino dancers, singers and instrumentalists. Filipino nurses will also provide free blood pressure and sugar level readings.Also on Sunday, Filipino physicians, nurses and health specialists will present a free Vim, Vigor and Longevity Health Expo in the Senior Center, 17th and Simpson Ave., from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. This will include health assessments such as Body Mass Index, Lung Capacity, Blood Pressure/Glucose Testing, Blood Cholesterol Testing, plus a taste of Vegan Treats and more.I am proud to continue this ongoing partnership, and the City of Ocean City warmly welcomes Consul General Mario DeLeon, Jr. and all of our Sister-City partners. I hope everyone has the opportunity this weekend to participate in this culturally enriching experience.Warm regards,Jay A. GillianMayorlast_img read more

May
2

Brian Heritage to Join Father in N.J. Surfing Hall of Fame

first_imgBy Donald WittkowskiMost 5-year-old boys will probably spend their days on the beach building sandcastles, flying a kite or playing ball.Brian Heritage, the son of legendary Sea Isle City surf shop owner Dan Heritage, was already riding a surfboard when he was just 5. A treasured black-and-white photo showing him surfing in Sea Isle in 1967 proves it.“I grew up as a second-generation water baby, literally,” Heritage recalled of his family’s ties to the surfing industry.Glancing fondly at the old photo, he noted, “That was the first surfboard ever made for me.”Heritage’s late father made him the board. Dan Heritage, who founded Heritage Surf and Sport in Sea Isle with his wife, Barbara, was an acclaimed surfboard shaper who is a member of the East Coast Surfing Hall of Fame and New Jersey Surfing Hall of FameBrian Heritage, now 55, is set to join his father in the New Jersey Surfing Hall of Fame. He will be inducted Friday night during ceremonies at the Flanders Hotel in Ocean City. He is being honored for his days as a top-level professional surfer as well as a mentor to legions of younger surfers.“To me, it’s a family legacy,” he said of the honor. “It’s not just New Jersey. It’s also a recognition and representation of surfing on the entire East Coast.”Although he certainly didn’t know it at the time, those thrilling first moments on the surfboard at 5 years old were the start of a lifelong passion for the sport.“The shop guys had a hand in watching me at the beach when I was a little kid because my parents were busy at the store,” Heritage said.Heritage Surf & Sport owner Brian Heritage is being inducted into the New Jersey Surfing Hall of Fame on Friday night.At first, the older surfers would make fun of him for staying close to shore in the shallow water and gentle surf. Growing tired of the teasing, a breakthrough came when he decided to join them in the open water.“One day, when I was around 10, I paddled to the outside. From then on, you couldn’t stop me,” he said.In his teens, he became a highly skilled surfer, competing in the East Coast championships in the short- and long-board divisions. His amateur career included surfing in 10 East Coast championship finals.He turned professional in 1982 when he was 20. As a pro, he was among the top 16 ranked surfers in the Association of Surfing Professionals East.At the height of his pro career, he was among the top 75 surfers in the world. While competing in the world tour, he surfed in Europe, the Caribbean, the continental U.S and Hawaii.The life of a prof surfer may sound glamorous, but Heritage noted that in those days the top competitors were making only about $20,000 annually and he earned just $2,000 per year.“There wasn’t a whole lot of money to be made,” he said.Heritage, though, said he became the first surfer to secure a sponsorship deal, paving the way for the modern-day surfers who make big money from commercial endorsements. His first sponsorship deal was with Sundek clothing. He lined up other sponsors later.Heritage looks over old photos and newspaper clips chronicling his surfing career and family business.Heritage was also at the forefront of technological changes in surfing during his pro career. The surfboards themselves were changing in a new wave of innovation. His father, renowned for his surfboard shaping, gave him an advantage.“Having a father who was at the cutting edge of technology helped me to stay around,” he said.Heritage was shaping his own boards while on the pro circuit. At the same time, he was encouraging other New Jersey surfers to learn how to shape their boards to capitalize on the latest innovations.After retiring from prof surfing in the early 1990s, Heritage began serving as a mentor to younger surfers. Even while he was still a pro, he stepped into the role of surfing promoter. He organized professional surfing competitions at the Jersey Shore in conjunction with the Association of Surfing Professionals and also developed teams of young surfers.“I guess I’m most proud of the mentoring of literally thousands of surfers and giving them a shot at learning something new and making something of themselves on the world stage,” he said.In the business world, Heritage and his family have built up their holdings outside Sea Isle. They expanded the Heritage Surf & Sport brand to Ocean City and Margate. Heritage said he took a cue from his father in business.“My dad used to say, ‘Always lead and never follow,’’’ Heritage said. “It led very quickly to the development of our third store in Margate.”Heritage’s 73-year-old mother remains the matriarch of the business. Brian is also joined by his wife, Jamie, and his sister, Tracy, 53, in running the shops.He paid tribute to his mother, in particular, for developing the stores in what is largely a male-dominated industry.“She gave birth to what is a lot in the industry,” he said.Heritage and his wife, Jamie, are joined by their golden retriever, Jessie, in front of their Sea Isle shop on Landis Avenue.Heritage Surf & Sport traces its roots to the early 1960s, when Dan Heritage began making boards in his garage and selling them to surfers on Long Beach Island in Ocean County.Considered one of the founding fathers of South Jersey surfing, Dan Heritage opened his first surfing store in Sea Isle in 1964, two years after Brian was born.Brian followed in his father’s footsteps as a surfer, mentor, promoter, surfboard maker and businessman. Now, he is about to join his father in the New Jersey Surfing Hall of Fame in recognition of his own accomplishments in the surfing world. A 5-year-old Brian Heritage rides the waves along Sea Isle City in 1967.last_img read more

Apr
20

Notre Dame issues work from home statement to staff

first_imgCoronavirusIndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Facebook Notre Dame issues work from home statement to staff Pinterest Twitter Google+ Previous articleTravel ban to extend to United Kingdom, IrelandNext articleCoronavirus fears close all gaming and racing operations in Indiana on Monday Tommie Lee Pinterest WhatsAppcenter_img Twitter By Tommie Lee – March 14, 2020 0 642 Google+ Staff update:By the end of the day on Tuesday, March 17 and until further notice, staff whose roles allow it may, with the approval of their supervisor, begin to work from home.We will continue to monitor the situation and will ask staff to return to campus when appropriate pic.twitter.com/ofhTW7NN4t— Notre Dame (@NotreDame) March 14, 2020 WhatsApp Facebook (“Notre Dame – 28” by Garden State Hiker, CC BY 2.0) The University of Notre Dame issued a statement Saturday to their staff regarding working from home.The joint message from the school’s president, provost, and executive vice-president announces guidelines for a work-from-home policy for their staff effective Tuesday, March 17.From the statement:Based upon what we know now and with your well-being as our top priority, we ask staff to adopt the following measures:By the end of the day on Tuesday, March 17 and until further notice, staff whose roles allow it may, with the approval of their supervisor, begin to work from home.Some jobs will require employees to be physically present on campus. The University remains committed to the safety of all those who work on campus during this time and will continue to adopt recommended safety measures.Supervisors will clarify who is expected to work from home or on campus. If there is any uncertainty, please talk directly with your supervisor.To the extent appropriate and in consultation with your supervisor, please take home any equipment and materials you need to complete your work. For those working remotely, please communicate with your supervisor about any challenges you encounter in doing your work, as each of us remains responsible for meeting our job responsibilities.last_img read more

Jan
1

Testimony of Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin before the US House Committee on Oversight and Reform

first_imgRanking Member Elijah E Cummings sent a letter yesterday to Chairman Darrell Issa requesting that the Committee invite Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin to testify at today’s congressionial hearing entitled ‘State and Municipal Debt: Tough Choices Ahead.’Cummings, as the highest ranking Democrat on the committee said:‘As an executive of a state in the process of navigating its own projected budget shortfall, Governor Shumlin will provide valuable insight as his state and the entire country continue to recover from the recent economic recession,’ said Cummings. ‘Governor Shumlin will also bring a perspective that is markedly different than that of the majority’s witness, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, allowing the Committee to obtain a wider and more balanced range of views on these issues.’  Walker, of course, is a newly elected Republican and Shumlin is a newly elected Democrat.Shumlin’s prepared statement offered today follows:House Committee on Oversight and ReformApril 14, 2011 “Chairman Issa, Ranking Member Cummings, and members of the Oversight and Reform Committee, which includes my Congressman and friend, Peter Welch: thank you for the opportunity to testify today. Governor Walker, it’s good to see you again. While we may have some differences on issues, we have some things in common, not least is that we are both wrapping up our first 100 days in office. I wish you the best as you continue your term.”I would like to start by directly addressing the question of what is causing the current fiscal crises that most of our states are experiencing. Put simply, these crises are the result of the greatest economic recession since the Great Depression. While we can save a debate over the cause of this recession for a different day, there is no doubt that my state and others like mine are facing significant budget shortfalls because our revenues are down and the need for government services is up. Thankfully, the economy is starting to show signs of improvement, and, while we will be left to deal with the impact of the recession for some time to come, the economic forecast is brightening. “In the long term, the most significant cost driver in Vermont is health care. We spend $5 billion on health care in our small state of 620,000, and that number is growing exponentially. Our other area of high spending is corrections, where we struggle with high recidivism rates among non-violent offenders at a price that is high and growing. “Also on our list of long-term fiscal concerns are our state pension and retiree health care obligations for state employees. What we have learned in this area is that there are steps we can take to significantly reduce costs to taxpayers without undermining traditional defined benefit plans, which most objective parties agree provide far better retirement security, serve to retain quality employees, and are more efficient than defined contribution plans. “What is puzzling to me about the current debate about state budgets is that the focus has been not on bringing people together to solve common problems, like we have done in Vermont, but on division and blame. “I do not believe that those to blame for our current financial troubles are our law enforcement officers, firefighters, and other state employees whose services we take for granted. The notion that a state trooper making a middle class living with health care benefits for her family, or a snow plow driver who works long hours in dangerous conditions and makes a decent but modest wage, is responsible for this problem is simply false. “Does that mean that we shouldn’t ask our state employees to do their part to get us out of our fiscal problems? Of course not ‘ we can and should ask everyone to sacrifice, and we’ve done just that in Vermont. We negotiated a 3 percent cut in salary for all state employees, and those at higher income levels have taken a 5 percent pay cut, for two years with no step or other increases. With our public employees, we agreed to higher retirement ages for state employees and teachers, increased contribution rates, and ratcheted down retiree health benefitsâ ¦ all without lawsuits, and without circumventing the collective bargaining process that has strengthened the middle class in Vermont and America. “Our experience in Vermont stands in stark contrast with those of some other states in recent months. In fact, Vermont is an excellent illustration of what states can do when we put aside partisan differences, tone down heated rhetoric between labor and management, and work together for the best interests of our citizens. “Consider the changes to Vermont’s Teacher pension and retiree health plans that went into effect this past July. The state’s annual actuarially required pension contribution decreased by almost 25 percent right away. Long-term unfunded liabilities were reduced substantially. Several years ago, our state employees agreed to similar changes, with higher retirement ages and contribution levels. They have just agreed to another increase in their pension contribution rates starting in July. “These negotiations were long, difficult, and often tense. But they lacked the type of rancor and acrimony that we have seen recently in other places. What made the difference was the ability for both sides to give and take, not just take. I have often said that in Vermont, we find that we get a lot more with maple syrup than we do with vinegar. Maybe it’s because we are a small state where we focus more on our similarities than our differences, but my sense is that if we can make these tough choices in Vermont, we can make them in other states as well.”last_img read more

Dec
30

Worth Driving To

first_imgA road trip is not a trivial thing, even if the destination is trivial.Boiled peanuts. Is there anything that signifies the essence of a road trip better than a bag of boiled peanuts, purchased with cash from a shack on the side of the road? In my mind, there is no better road trip food, which is ironic considering the boiled peanut is one of the toughest foods to eat in a car, logistically speaking. They take two hands to eat, they’re juicy as hell, and you’ve got those shells to discard somewhere. And yet, I can’t imagine a proper road trip without a bag of damn-salty boiled peanuts. Of course, you have to be on a road trip to enjoy boiled peanuts. For whatever reason, they don’t sell that particular snack in metropolitan cities. Even if there was a boiled peanut stand on the street, it wouldn’t taste the same. You’ve got to drive for these Southern delicacies. There needs to be at least 100 miles on your trip odometer before you can truly enjoy the mushy goodness of a boiled peanut.Now, is a $2.99 bag of overcooked nuts reason enough to drive several hours, possibly crossing state lines? In a word, yes. A bag of boiled peanuts is a perfectly valid reason to hit the road.I can track my own personal evolution through a series of road trips. I went to my first strip bar on a road trip. I started my first accidental fire with a misguided pyrotechnics show on a road trip. I discovered craft beer on a road trip. I climbed my first rock wall on a road trip. I saw my first Allman Brothers show on a road trip. You could say I owe everything that is good in my life to a road trip: It was on a road trip that I first met my wife. And it was through several subsequent road trips that I finally wore her down into the submission that society calls “marriage.”So believe me, the road trip is an important thing. But that doesn’t mean you need an important destination for your road trip. You don’t always have to set your sights on some place epic like Las Vegas. In fact, I’d argue that the more trivial the final destination of a given road trip, the better that trip will be.To prove my point, here are five seemingly trivial things worth driving a very long way to experience.Chesapeake Bay OystersTrivial DestinationChesapeake Bay OystersWhy It’s Worth the Gas: The Chesapeake Bay oyster has long been a delicacy, but over-harvesting and pollution have put a strain on this wonderful natural resource. Oystermen used to pull more than a million bushels of oysters a year out of the Chesapeake Bay. Now, they’re harvesting less than one percent of that level. The Chesapeake oyster is salty, succulent, and only in season during winter months. Check out the Urbanna Oyster Festival, in November, for true oyster culture and an all-you-can-shuck competition. urbannaoysterfestival.comTrivial DestinationHowling Moon Moonshine Why It’s Worth the Gas: In a word, “process.” There are bigger moonshine makers in the South, but there might not be a more purposeful legal moonshine distillery in our parts. The folks at Howling Moon create small batch hooch made from local corn, using a family recipe, in a hand-crafted still with pipes held together with rye paste. Now that’s old school. Howling Moon can only produce 80 cases a month, and you can only find it in a dozen places in Western North Carolina. howlingmoonshine.comTrivial DestinationOconee Bell WildflowerWhy It’s Worth the Gas: This tiny white bloom is one of the rarest wildflowers in the U.S.  For nearly a century, scientists thought it was completely extinct until a teenager found one while hanging out in the woods. Today, you can find the flower in only seven counties, all lying in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. The flower blooms in early spring. The best place to see the Oconee Bell en masse is along the Oconee Bell Nature Trail inside South Carolina’s Devil’s Fork State Park. southcarolinaparks.com Trivial DestinationSoft Shell Crab Why It’s Worth the Gas: Enjoying a good soft shell crab is all about being at the right place at the right time. Every spring, blue crabs molt out of their hard casings, allowing crabbers to catch them in their more delicate “underpants” so to speak. Soft shell season typically starts with the first full moon in May, and the crab are considered the tastiest before the next full moon in June. The window is short. You can get them frozen, but that is just a “shell” of the soft shell experience. Like seeing a picture of the Mona Lisa, instead of the actual painting hanging in the Louvre. Check out the Kayak and Crab tour in the Outer Banks, where you kayak to catch your own crabs, then learn how to cook them. outerbanksepicurean.comTrivial DestinationDark SkyWhy It’s Worth the Gas: A truly dark sky is an increasingly rare thing these days. In fact, I’d be willing to argue that few of us have ever truly experienced a dark sky full of stars. Spruce Knob, at 4,863 feet, is the highest mountain in West Virginia and is surrounded by mostly forest and tiny towns that don’t emit much light pollution. Thanks to the sheer volume of people in the Southeast, Spruce Knob is one of the last truly dark places in the Southern Appalachians. Go there for vertigo-inducing darkness and more stars than you can count. darksky.orglast_img read more

Dec
30

ORVIS: INNOVATORS AND AMERICAN CRAFTSMEN

first_imgWhy Would You Build a One-Piece Fly Rod?There are a number of reasons not to, but there is one much more compelling reason to do it. A one-piece is the ultimate and unbroken expression of the rod builder’s art. Designing the perfect taper and creating the smoothest transfer of power from the hand, through the rod, and into the cast is the goal of every rodmaker. At a certain point though, convenience rears up and that perfect transfer is compromised by the need to shorten the rod for conveyance from one place to another. While modern ferrule design is remarkable in its ability to transfer that power with minimal invasiveness, it still isn’t perfection. In the case of the HeliosTM 2 One-Piece, convenience be damned.We built it because we can and, our desire for perfection far outweighed our desire for convenience. Is it for everyone? Of course not, but if your desire is to own the most innovative y rod in the world, with the smoothest and most effortless transfer of power and accuracy ever conceived, then you must own a Helios 2 One-Piece. Once you sh one, you’ll quickly figure out how to make it convenient. Come to an Orvis store near you and see the newest and most innovative fly-fishing gear available. center_img Built in America. There is a startling transformation from a solid block of 6061 T6 barstock aluminum to a finished jewel of a fly reel. It’s a combination of art and engineering that stands as testament to the unmatched quality of American craftsmanship. The new Mirage is a technologically advanced reel, designed, machined, and built in New England in a collaboration of Orvis’s storied history of reel innovation and pure no-compromise American manufacturing. It was conceived and designed from the ground up to o er elegantly powerful and precise performance, built around a silky smooth, sealed, and maintenance-free drag—the most advanced patent-pending drag system ever designed. Adjustment from zero to dead stop in a single drag knob rotation. Finished with type III military-spec anodization. Orvis conceived. American built. Mirage.We took two simple fly-fishing tools and made them industry award winners. The nest pliers on the market today, Orvis Pliers are ergonomically designed and made in the USA to work with the natural shape and angle of your hand. Made of machined aluminum with type III military-spec anodization, they o er replaceable cutters and jaws with excellent corrosion resistance and edge retention. The leather sheath is made in the USA by Gokey®, and a coil lanyard is included. The Orvis Nipper revolutionizes nipper design and function. Made in the USA of machined 6061-T6 aluminum, these nippers incorporate a piano-style hinge that adds mechanical advantage for easily cutting anything from 80 lb. to 8X tippet with an ergonomic contour for comfort and enhanced function. Replaceable cutter and anvil o er excellent corrosion resistance and edge retention, and it has a rotating stainless steel rotating hook-eye cleaner. Type III military-spec anodization and comes with a lanyard made from fly line.last_img read more

Dec
18

Trump Speech Spotlights Long Island Gang Issue

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York President Donald Trump twice mentioned Long Island in his first State of the Union address Tuesday while discussing his administration’s war on the violent transnational street gang MS-13 that’s killed dozens locally.Trump congratulated Homeland Security Investigations Special Agent Celestino Martinez for leading an operation to track down the gang’s members on LI. But first, the president called attention to four of his guests, the parents of Brentwood teenagers Nisa Mickens and Kayla Cuevas, who were both killed by the gang in 2016.“These two precious girls were brutally murdered while walking together in their hometown,” he said. “Six members of the savage gang MS-13 have been charged with Kayla and Nisa’s murders. Many of these gang members took advantage of glaring loopholes in our laws to enter the country as unaccompanied alien minors — and wound up in Kayla and Nisa’s high school.”Mickens’ parents, Elizabeth Alvarado and Robert Mickens, and Cuevas’ parents, Evelyn Rodriguez and Freddy Cuevas, wiped away tears as the president mentioned their daughters and asked the four to stand.“Evelyn, Elizabeth, Freddy, and Robert: Tonight, everyone in this chamber is praying for you,” Trump said. “Everyone in America is grieving for you. And 320 million hearts are breaking for you. We cannot imagine the depth of your sorrow, but we can make sure that other families never have to endure this pain.”Trump used the case as an example of why Congress should pass his four-part immigration plan. The proposal would end the visa lottery, complete the wall along the US-Mexico border, end chain migration and create a path to citizenship for 1.8 undocumented immigrants whose parents brought them to America as minors.He also used it to segue into his call on Congress to increase funding to federal law enforcement agencies such as U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. He noted that Agent “CJ” Martinez didn’t back down from his pursuit of MS-13 members despite the gang ordering a hit on him.“I asked CJ, what’s the secret” Trump said in an unscripted part of the speech. “And he said, ‘we’re just tougher than they are.’”LI’s congressional representatives also brought guests to the address.U.S. Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-Shirley) brought deli owner Donato Panico, who founded the nonprofit organization “Heros 4 Our Heroes,” which provides food to local firefighters, police and veterans.U.S. Rep. Tom Suozzi (D-Glen Cove) invited 27-year- old Nelson Melgar of Glen Cove. Melgar, a graduate of Hunter College, is a DACA enrollee who first came to this country 14 years ago from Honduras.“Proud to have Nelson as my guest at this year’s State of the Union address,” Suozzi tweeted. “He represents what is best about our community.”—With Christa Ganz and Stephanie Perronelast_img read more